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View Full Version : San Franciscoís invasion of Canada has begun (in Edmonton)



TerryH
28-08-2013, 10:57 PM
"On my first day in Alberta, Canada I am greeted by gracious Edmontonians bearing platters of smoked meats, a local tradition perhaps, and upon joining my reconnaissance troop, the small but mighty Naked Empire Bouffon Company, who Iím stage-managing for their one-month Fringe Festival tour, we head down to the 32nd Edmonton International Fringe Theatre Festival headquarters to discover what we can about the territory. The Edmonton Fringe is the second largest in the world after Edinburgh (the original), attracting over a half-million people to the festival site, and hosting over 200 performing companies over the course of 11 days. Mixed in with the vast throng of performers from around the world, a small regiment of infiltrators from the Bay Area have scattered themselves throughout the festival grounds and venues, a quiet invasion of quirky monologists and seasoned storytellers."

http://www.sfbg.com/pixel_vision/2013/08/20/performant-surrender-dorothy

McBoo
29-08-2013, 02:37 PM
It's one of those really, incredibly below the radar things:

The acts that come to the Edmonton Fringe, the Edmonton Jazz, Edmonton Folk Festivals (among others) probably are better ambassadors for our city than we possibly realize.

That AND the U of A. Can't tell you how well regarded that institution is almost globally.

kkozoriz
29-08-2013, 10:07 PM
Enjoy it while you can. There;s some changes that have just come into effect that may have a chilling effect of some of the festivals and businesses that provide entertainment.


The new rules, which quietly came into effect July 31, will double, triple or even quadruple the cost of bringing in international artists to perform in venues such as pubs, restaurants and night clubs whose main business is not entertainment.

The regulations require that any venue with a primary business other than music but that also books bands or performers must now pay an application fee of $275 per musician and those travelling with the band — such as tour managers, sound persons and guitar techs — when it applies for a Labour Market Opinion, or LMO, which allows those outside workers to perform and work in their establishment. That’s in addition to an extra $150 for each approved musician and crew member’s work permit.

Before the changes, the fee was simply $150 per band member, maxing out at $450, and that was a one-time fee for them to simply enter the country, which allowed venue owners across Canada to share the nominal cost or book them separately at no extra charge.



Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/fees+international+touring+musicians+threaten+smal ler+clubs+live+venues+across+Canada/8842759/story.html#ixzz2dQEBX6PS

Replacement
29-08-2013, 10:24 PM
Enjoy it while you can. There;s some changes that have just come into effect that may have a chilling effect of some of the festivals and businesses that provide entertainment.


The new rules, which quietly came into effect July 31, will double, triple or even quadruple the cost of bringing in international artists to perform in venues such as pubs, restaurants and night clubs whose main business is not entertainment.

The regulations require that any venue with a primary business other than music but that also books bands or performers must now pay an application fee of $275 per musician and those travelling with the band ó such as tour managers, sound persons and guitar techs ó when it applies for a Labour Market Opinion, or LMO, which allows those outside workers to perform and work in their establishment. Thatís in addition to an extra $150 for each approved musician and crew memberís work permit.

Before the changes, the fee was simply $150 per band member, maxing out at $450, and that was a one-time fee for them to simply enter the country, which allowed venue owners across Canada to share the nominal cost or book them separately at no extra charge.



Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/fees+international+touring+musicians+threaten+smal ler+clubs+live+venues+across+Canada/8842759/story.html#ixzz2dQEBX6PS

Just to keep in mind theres a stated exemption for buskers, theatre performing acts, festival acts, bands on tour, etc.

Weird and unnecessary legislation imo but I'm not certain too much will change in this. Seems like bar acts will be targeted more than anything. Again not sure why.

MrOilers
30-08-2013, 09:19 AM
Enjoy it while you can. There;s some changes that have just come into effect that may have a chilling effect of some of the festivals and businesses that provide entertainment.


The new rules, which quietly came into effect July 31, will double, triple or even quadruple the cost of bringing in international artists to perform in venues such as pubs, restaurants and night clubs whose main business is not entertainment.

The regulations require that any venue with a primary business other than music but that also books bands or performers must now pay an application fee of $275 per musician and those travelling with the band ó such as tour managers, sound persons and guitar techs ó when it applies for a Labour Market Opinion, or LMO, which allows those outside workers to perform and work in their establishment. Thatís in addition to an extra $150 for each approved musician and crew memberís work permit.

Before the changes, the fee was simply $150 per band member, maxing out at $450, and that was a one-time fee for them to simply enter the country, which allowed venue owners across Canada to share the nominal cost or book them separately at no extra charge.



Read more: http://www.calgaryherald.com/fees+international+touring+musicians+threaten+smal ler+clubs+live+venues+across+Canada/8842759/story.html#ixzz2dQEBX6PS

I don't think this legislation would change much.

Ninety percent of the time a smaller act comes through, the promoter will book an "exempt" venue, which is basically "anywhere where music is it's primary (preferably exclusive) business". That means no bars or restaurants, but even so, there are ways around it.

I know someone who has brought numerous bands over the border in the last couple of years with no problems, and none of them have even been taxed for their merchandise. I think agents just have to know their paperwork and venues. I assume for larger shows there is no way they would be playing anywhere but a legitimate concert hall or venue anyways.