PDA

View Full Version : Major tourism sites reviews of Edmonton



m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:11 PM
Just figured that I'd try and compile a list of all the major tourism reference sites, and link to their descriptions of Edmonton:

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:11 PM
Fodor' (http://www.fodors.com/miniguides/[email protected]&cur_section=ove)s ~

Overview


Perched on the steep banks of the North Saskatchewan River, Edmonton is the capital city of Alberta and the sixth-largest city in Canada, with a metro-area population of one million. As the seat of the provincial government and home to the University of Alberta, the city is sophisticated and multiethnic, spawning a thriving arts community and fine restaurants. Known as "Edmonton Festival City," this provincial capital plays host to more than 35 festivals annually, including 12 major arts festivals during an 11-week period each summer.

The thriving northern city is a boomtown that never seems to go bust. What started as a trading post morphed into a metropolis as a result of three major booms over some 200 years. In 1795, the North West Company and Hudson's Bay Company founded Fort Edmonton as a trading post on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. Then, during the Klondike Gold Rush in 1897, Edmonton became a starting point for prospectors en route to the Yukon Territory. The annual 10-day Klondike Days Celebration in July celebrates this aspect of the city's history. Edmonton's third boom gushed from the ground on a cold February morning in 1947, when oil was discovered in Leduc, 40 km (25 mi) to the southwest. More than 10,000 wells were eventually drilled within 100 km (62 mi) of the city, and with them came numerous refineries and supply depots. By 1965, Edmonton had solidified its role as "oil capital of Canada" and today commemorates that role with an NHL hockey team known as the Edmonton Oilers and a Northern League baseball team known as the Edmonton Cracker-Cats.

Edmonton's parks and green spaces aren't typical oil-town scenery. Twenty-two parks along the North Saskatchewan River valley encompass 18,348 acres, have 122 km (76 mi) of trails, and form the largest stretch of urban parkland in North America, known as the river valley parkland.

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:13 PM
Frommers (http://www.frommers.com/destinations/edmonton/1300010001.html) ~

Introduction to Edmonton


283km (175 miles) N of Calgary, 361km (224 miles) E of Jasper

Edmonton, Alberta's capital, is located on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. It's a sophisticated city of around 1 million citizens that's noted for its summer festivals and easygoing friendliness.

Edmonton grew in spurts, following a boom-and-bust pattern as exciting as it was unreliable. During World War II, the boom came in the form of the Alaska Highway, with Edmonton as the material base and temporary home of 50,000 American troops and construction workers. The ultimate boom, however, gushed from the ground in 1947, when a drill at Leduc, 40km (25 miles) southwest of the city, sent a fountain of crude oil soaring skyward. Some 10,000 other wells followed, and in their wake came the petrochemical industry and the refining and supply conglomerates. In 20 years, the population quadrupled, the skyline mushroomed with glass-and-concrete office towers, a rapid-transit system was created, and a C$150-million (US$120-million) civic center rose. Edmonton had become what it is today -- the oil capital of Canada.

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:15 PM
Lonely Planet ~


nothing

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:17 PM
Rough Guides (http://www.roughguides.com/website/travel/destination/content/default.aspx?titleid=84&xid=idh297647208_0625) ~


Edmonton and northern Alberta
Unless transport connections oblige you to pass through Edmonton, there's no substantial reason, apart from the Folk Music Festival, to visit the more downbeat of Alberta's pair of pivotal cities. It is, though, a starting point from which you can either head west into the Rockies and Jasper National Park, or aim for the unimaginable vastness of the far northern interior. Northern Alberta contains the only all-weather road link to Yellowknife, capital of the Northwest Territories, but other than Wood Buffalo National Park – the largest protected area in Canada – and a surfeit of fishing possibilities, the region has almost nothing to waylay most casual visitors.

RyanS
29-03-2007, 05:19 PM
wow, amazingly that rough guide review is a considerable improvement from their old review.

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:20 PM
Yahoo! Travel (http://travel.yahoo.com/p-travelguide-757674-edmonton_edmonton-i;_ylt=Aj_TLjo.RfbX88xu5w0H9YoQFmoL)~

Alberta's provincial capital, EDMONTON is among Canada's most northerly cities, and at times – notably in the teeth of its bitter winters – it can seem a little too far north for comfort. Situated above the waters of the North Saskatchewan River, whose park-filled valley winds below the high-rises of downtown, the city tries hard with its festivals, parks, restaurants and urban-renewal projects. With a downtown area that still has the somewhat unfinished feel of a frontier town, however, it's perhaps appropriate that the premier attraction for the vast majority of visitors is a shopping centre, the infamous West Edmonton Mall. This certainly has curiosity value, but not really enough to merit a special journey here. Downtown has a handful of modest sights, though most enjoyment in the city is to be had in Old Strathcona, a rejuvenated "historic" district south of the North Saskatchewan River filled with heritage buildings, modest museums and plenty of eating and drinking venues. Edmonton lacks the big set-piece museums of Calgary and Vancouver, but its Space and Science Centre is a sight within a whisker of the first rank.

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:23 PM
Mobil Travel Guide (http://mobiltravelguide.howstuffworks.com/edmonton-ab-guide.htm) ~

About Edmonton, Alberta:
As the capital of a province whose economic mainstays are petroleum and agriculture, Edmonton has all the brash confidence of its position as a major supplier of one of the world's most sought-after resources, yet traces of the practical reticence nurtured by its past still linger.

The first Fort Edmonton, established in 1795, was named for Edmonton, England, now a suburb of London. The fort was relocated several times before its fifth site location near the present Alberta Legislature Building. With the close of the fur trade era, a settlement grew up around the fort and became the nucleus of the city. The sixth fort, a reconstruction from the fur-trading days, is now a major attraction in the city's river valley.

In the 1890s, Edmonton became a major supply depot for the gold rush to the Yukon, since it was on the All-Canadian Route to the Klondike. Thousands of men stopped for days, weeks, or months before making the final 1,500-mile (2,400-kilometer) trip to Yukon gold. Many decided to stay in the town, turning a quiet village into a prosperous city. Each July the city returns to the colorful era of the gold rush for ten days of fun and frolic called Edmonton's Klondike Days.

Edmonton prides itself on having more park area per capita than any other city in Canada. The park area winds along the banks of the North Saskatchewan River, Edmonton's most prominent physical characteristic. Capital City Recreation Park encompasses 3,000 acres (1,214 hectares) with 18 miles (29 kilometers) of biking and hiking trails along the river valley.

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 05:24 PM
Travelocity (http://leisure.travelocity.com/DestGuides/search_process/1,5372,TRAVELOCITY,00.html?searchsource=results&keyword=edmonton&x=74&y=9) ~

We're sorry, your search for "edmonton" yielded no results. Please enter another destination name. For improved results, enter the name of a specific city, island, etc. For more info, see Search Help.

travis
29-03-2007, 05:30 PM
Wikitravel


Edmonton [1] is the capital city of Alberta and home to much of that province's industry. It is well known as the cultural centre of Alberta, and has been nicknamed Festival City of Canada. Events and attractions like The Edmonton Fringe Festival (North America's Largest), West Edmonton Mall (World's Largest Shopping and Entertainment Centre) and Fort Edmonton Park make Edmonton the largest tourist destination in the province of Alberta.

Edmonton is a northern North American city with a population of over 712,000 (2005), and one of the largest northern cities in the world. Its location makes for long, though not harsh, winters. But the compensating rewards include a sunny, comfortable summer with daylight and dusk stretching as late as 11 pm in June and July.

Chump
29-03-2007, 06:23 PM
Travelocity (http://leisure.travelocity.com/DestGuides/search_process/1,5372,TRAVELOCITY,00.html?searchsource=results&keyword=edmonton&x=74&y=9) ~

We're sorry, your search for "edmonton" yielded no results. Please enter another destination name. For improved results, enter the name of a specific city, island, etc. For more info, see Search Help.

:smt044

Holy crap thats hillarious, I laughed loud enough to attract hallway attention with that one. Sad. But oh so funny.... (sigh... :smt011 )

m0nkyman
29-03-2007, 06:49 PM
wow, amazingly that rough guide review is a considerable improvement from their old review.

The frightening accuracy of it's description of Victoria, makes that one hurt all the more:

VICTORIA is British Columbia's provincial capital and the region's second city after Vancouver. It's a popular excursion from Vancouver, and though it's possible to come here for the day – especially if you take a seaplane from Vancouver's harbour – you'd be better advised to stay overnight and give the city the two or so days it deserves.
This said, Victoria has a lot to live up to. Leading US travel magazine Condι Nast Traveler has voted it one of the world's top ten cities to visit, and world number one for ambience and environment. It's not named after a queen and an era for nothing. Much of the waterfront area has an undeniably quaint and likeable English feel – "Brighton Pavilion with the Himalayas for a backdrop," said the writer Rudyard Kipling – and Victoria has more British-born residents than anywhere in Canada. However, its tourist potential is exploited chiefly for American visitors, served up with lashings of fake Victoriana and chintzy commercialism, and ersatz echoes of empire at every turn. Despite the seasonal influx, and the sometimes atrociously tacky attractions designed to part tourists from their money, it's a small, relaxed and pleasantly sophisticated place, worth lingering in if only for its inspirational museum. It also provides plenty of pubs, restaurants (and the odd club) and serves as a base for a range of outdoor activities and slightly more far-flung attractions. Chief of these is whale-watching, with a plethora of companies on hand to take you out to the teeming waters around the city. And as a final lure the weather here – though often damp – is extremely mild; Victoria's meteorological station has the distinction of being the only one in Canada to record a winter in which the temperature never fell below freezing.

Sonic Death Monkey
30-03-2007, 06:54 PM
Travelocity (http://leisure.travelocity.com/DestGuides/search_process/1,5372,TRAVELOCITY,00.html?searchsource=results&keyword=edmonton&x=74&y=9) ~

We're sorry, your search for "edmonton" yielded no results. Please enter another destination name. For improved results, enter the name of a specific city, island, etc. For more info, see Search Help.

No Calgary nor Vancouver either.
It can find Toronto and Montreal though.

Sonic Death Monkey
30-03-2007, 06:58 PM
Lonely Planet ~


nothing

Only lists 5 Canadian cities:
Halifax
Quebec City
Montreal
Toronto
Vancouver