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  • Help: stolen bicycle

    Bike was stolen from my home in the west end (La Perle) on the evening of Thursday, June 29. Bike looks similar to the one shown in the picture (custom built). If anyone sees anything, please let me know ASAP, thanks!

    Brand: Giant
    Model: NRS
    Color: Team Blue
    Other: has gel seat cover, eggbeater pedals, speedometer

    Thief came in through backyard, left his/her own bike behind and rode away with mine. If anyone sees a posting here or any other Edmonton area sites, I would greatly appreciate help in tracking it down. This incident has been reported to EPS.


  • #2
    I wish you the best of luck, and I'll keep my eyes open. I've had two stolen in the last year, and there are others on this forum who've been victims as well.

    Bike theft is rampant in Edmonton, and other cities (but especially Edmonton), and most often people do not get their bike back. I hope the various police services are on this - bikes these days cost hundreds or thousands of dollars, and bike theft is big business.

    I wonder if there's an organized crime element involved that ships stolen bikes to other places or strips the parts. There's no way 1500 bikes a year can just disappear in Edmonton.
    aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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    • #3
      I remember seeing something on the National saying that organized crime is responsible for a significant percentage of the bike thefts in Canada, and I would assume that the same can be said for Edmonton (we are a part of Canada afterall).

      Comment


      • #4
        Getting your bike stolen sucks, sorry to hear of your loss.

        I wonder where all these stolen bikes go. I can only think of one bike I've owned in my life that wasn't stolen. Surely the bike market in Edmonton is not that hot, so they must end up somewhere else. Unless there is an underground bike cult in Millwoods that I don't know about.

        I won't even bother with bikes anymore. Walking works fine!

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        • #5
          There's no way 1500 bikes a year can just disappear in Edmonton.
          There's about a dozen natives that hang out at a joint by my place and all of them have nice bicycles, and I can say with confidence from their clothing and hygiene that these folks didn't walk into United Cycle and purchase them. Throw in the pile of bikes every week I see bent and wrecked around town as I tour about, and I don't think 1500 stolen bikes a year would be very difficult for those that have no fear of consequences.
          "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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          • #6
            I once bought a used bike at a pawn shop. A mistake.

            Outside two guys rode up. They looked like they lived outdoors, but they both had Specialized mountain bikes. They seemed kind of naive, and I didn't get the feeling they were thieves, but maybe customers. Who knows, people who can afford nice Specialized mountain bikes usually have homes and jobs. They told me their bikes were "river bikes', and said all you had to do was go down to the river valley (where?), and there were some nice bikes, just layin' around.

            I got the feeling they were putting out feelers to see if I'd be interested in buying a used bike, but maybe that's just my suspicious nature. I just bought a bike (subsequently stolen), I was in a hurry, and I'm not interested in buying a used $800 bike for $40 from a street guy, so I moved on. I should have asked some more questions I suppose. I still see them sometimes in the Critical Mass ride.

            The whole point of a speculated organized crime connection is that it isn't just in Edmonton, but that they have an organized network that can ship bikes between cities. There isn't only a market for bikes, but also for parts, including frames. EBay makes it that much simpler.

            I keep my bike in my cubicle at work, and inside my apartment at home. I pay $20/mo for a bike locker in a downtown Oxford highrise, and even when I lock it in the lockup, I lock my bike up. I use two locks when I lock up my bike, and I make sure it's in a highly visible location, with both wheels locked. I haven't insured it yet, but I'm going to.

            Please let us know if you get your bike back. The police find a lot of bikes that aren't claimed, so it's important to follow up. Check Kijiji and Craiglist, etc, of course, but nobody seems to have much luck with that. But you might, or you may find another bike, from a legitimate private seller. Some people buy nice bikes, especially mountain bikes, don't have time to ride them, and then just sell them off. With some maintenance, they can be as good as new for half the price or less.
            aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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            • #7
              Sorry to hear your bike got jacked. I'm always paranoid about getting my new bike stolen, so I keep it in my kitchen. And no, I don't even trust the garage since my buddy had his stolen from his garage while he was sleeping.

              Having some insurance on the bike couldn't hurt as that is how my buddy was able to purchase a new bike.

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              • #8
                A good site to post your stolen bike

                http://edmontonbikes.ca/stolenbikes/

                just got the link in my EBC newsletter.
                aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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                • #9
                  Here's something on topic that happened last week that I thought was very good to see.

                  Good friends own Prism bar & grill at 101 st & 105 ave. One night early last week one of their staff had a fairly unique and vintage Sekine touring bike stolen from the back of the building where it was chained up. The bike wasn't worth much but had quite a bit of sentimental value to its' owner.

                  My friends employ some of the locals to help sweep up the parking lot and keep the outside of the building clean, and a lot of the homeless people respect them because they treat them with a level of dignity that most don't. My friends put the word out that the bike had been stolen and that there was a $50 reward for its' return.

                  Well one of the fellows that cleans the lot spent the weekend scouring the downtown area and found the bike abandonned in the brush beside the Shaw. He held the bike for two days to ensure it got back to its' rightful owner. Needless to say, the bikes' owner was extremely suprised that she ever saw the bike again. My friend the bar owner said she's never seen someone so proud as when the homeless guy wheeled that bike in to return to its' owner. Sure, it's the $50, but it was also a senseo f pride and accomplishment that I don't think a lot of those guys get to experience very often.
                  Last edited by 240GLT; 03-07-2009, 01:04 PM.
                  Over promise and under deliver. It’s the most Edmonton thing you can do.

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                  • #10
                    Wow... great story. I'm glad the bike was returned.

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                    • #11
                      ^^ Yes! That's good to hear. Thanks for the post.
                      aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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                      • #12
                        The problem seems to be that people are spending way too much $ on bikes now and thereby making it an attractive target for theft.

                        Personally I don't recall ever paying more than 400-500bucks for a bike and have never had a problem with theft.

                        I can do a little less with the bike and give up some comfort but I do have the comfort of knowing the bike will always be there when I return.

                        Spending over a grand on a bike which by nature is very vulnerable to theft seems like a poor decision.

                        Sorry to seem un-supportive but the solution to bike theft is fairly easy.
                        "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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                        • #13
                          So the solution to bike theft is not to have a nice bike? Sorry, that "solution" don't work for me. I'm certain most feel the same. Spending over a grand )actually closer to 3 grand all-in) was one of the best decisions I've ever made. Not a poor decision at all.

                          To take it one step further, not having bikes at all completely solves the bike theft problem. Car theft - same thing. Get rid of all cars - problem solved. Guitars seem to be a target too.

                          Aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore?

                          By the way, I still have my nice bike. The two bikes I've had stolen this year (locked indoors in a secure building using two locks) cost $500 and $350 respectively. So much for that theory.

                          Too much is obviously different for you than it is for me. I like my nice bike. Maybe if you don't ride a lot, or use your bike mostly for relaxed Sunday rides, or if you've never ridden a better bike, it might not be a big deal. There's a big difference in riding between a $200+ bike and a $2000+ bike, a difference I appreciate daily.
                          Last edited by Jimbo; 04-07-2009, 07:00 PM.
                          aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jimbo View Post
                            So the solution to bike theft is not to have a nice bike? Sorry, that "solution" don't work for me. I'm certain most feel the same. Spending over a grand )actually closer to 3 grand all-in) was one of the best decisions I've ever made. Not a poor decision at all.

                            To take it one step further, not having bikes at all completely solves the bike theft problem. Car theft - same thing. Get rid of all cars - problem solved. Guitars seem to be a target too.

                            Aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore?

                            By the way, I still have my nice bike. The two bikes I've had stolen this year (locked indoors in a secure building using two locks) cost $500 and $350 respectively. So much for that theory.

                            Too much is obviously different for you than it is for me. I like my nice bike. Maybe if you don't ride a lot, or use your bike mostly for relaxed Sunday rides, or if you've never ridden a better bike, it might not be a big deal. There's a big difference in riding between a $200+ bike and a $2000+ bike, a difference I appreciate daily.
                            I've driven countless 1000's of kilos on bikes and for several decades. I've done Jasper to Banff, I routinely ride 100k, I've commuted, I've had no problem but a sore butt which I will say starts to adapt.

                            I simply don't see the problem with a cheap bike. Bikes were meant to be cheap. Its really a large point to them as vehicles. I'm sure the vast majority of the world that rides cheap bikes agrees with me on that one.

                            I have no idea why you think I am so limited by my choice in cheap bikes. (Only limitation being extreme rock hopping rides which I have no interest in anyway)
                            I've driven cheap touring and mountain bikes and never a problem in close to 5 decades.

                            If anything the less technological alloys seem to be more forgiving of some curb transgressions than the latest lightweight rim benders of the day.

                            As for your query "aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore" of course you are but expenisve bikes being very visible of course elicit theft which was my whole point.

                            I don't tend to have expensive things that are highly visible. Its been a sensible approach.

                            I avoid theft in this way.
                            Last edited by Replacement; 04-07-2009, 07:35 PM.
                            "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Replacement View Post
                              I've driven countless 1000's of kilos on bikes and for several decades. I've done Jasper to Banff, I routinely ride 100k, I've commuted, I've had no problem but a sore butt which I will say starts to adapt.

                              I simply don't see the problem with a cheap bike. Bikes were meant to be cheap. Its really a large point to them as vehicles. I'm sure the vast majority of the world that rides cheap bikes agrees with me on that one.

                              I have no idea why you think I am so limited with my choice in cheap bikes. (Only limitation being extreme rock hopping rides which I have no interest in anyway)
                              I've driven cheap touring and mountain bikes and never a problem in close to 5 decades.

                              If anything the less technological alloys seem to be more forgiving of some curb transgressions than the latest lightweight rim benders of the day.

                              As for your query "aren't we allowed to have anything nice anymore" of course you are but expenisve bikes being very visible of course elicit theft which was my whole point.

                              I don't tend to have expensive things that are highly visible. Its been a sensible approach.

                              I avoid theft in this way.
                              Aluminum (Cromoloy) doesn't rust, for one thing, which is important if you ride in wet conditions and snow. Ride a nice bike, properly set up, for a day, and if you can't see the difference, then stick with the cheaper bike. Some people just aren't that sensitive to what I find to be significant differences. Like I said, I've had three bikes over the last couple of years. The other two were tanks compared to my TriCross Comp.

                              I ride a lot, as do you, and many others on this forum as well. I'd be interested to see how many appreciate a nice bike. There's no problem with cheap bikes at all (I'm looking at getting a vintage "grocery getter"), and the differences may be wasted on some who don't require anything better, but they get stolen too.

                              There's never been anything that said bikes were meant to be cheap.

                              Personally, given that my bike takes the place of a car, I think $2500 is pretty cheap compared with even entry level cars, and the maintenance, parking, insurance, gas, etc I don't have to pay for makes it the best personal finance decision I've ever made.

                              Owning the crappiest bike on the block isn't going to solve the problem in any way, but it will make for a far less pleasurable daily commute for me. I love my bike.
                              Last edited by Jimbo; 04-07-2009, 07:59 PM.
                              aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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