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  • Cycling Infrastructure | Discussion

    Could we do the same thing here??

    Montreal Announces Bike Rental System



    Posted by: Nate Berg

    6 October 2007 - 11:00am
    Following the example set by Paris and Lyon, Montreal plans to be the first city in North America to set up a large-scale "self-serve" public bicycle rental service.

    Montreal announced yesterday it will follow Paris's bike path and offer hundreds of bicycles for self-serve rent.

    "The first city-issue self-serve bikes are to appear at specially designed outdoor stations in fall 2008. By autumn 2009, it's expected 2,400 bikes will be available for as little as $1 per half-hour, at 300 stations around central neighbourhoods."

    Earlier this year, Montreal announced a $3.7-million project to create a four-kilometre, all year long (read "open in Canadian Winter") bicycle path across its downtown core.

    The Parisian model for Montreal's experiment, known as Vélib, has been an extraordinary success. Within less than a fortnight, Vélib (an amalgam of vélo and libre) has registered more than 440,000 rentals.

    Source: The Montreal Gazette, Oct 05, 2007
    A people that elect corrupt politicians, imposters, thieves and traitors are not victims, but accomplices.

  • #2
    How did I miss something on Planetizen? I read every single summary...must not have been paying attention.

    Unsurprisingly, I say yes. I'll wait for someone to say no before I say any more.

    Comment


    • #3
      We saw these all over Paris this summer - more than the last time we went.

      Awesome for tourists an those in a rush, not bad prices, but I dont have stats on how they avoid thefts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Paris Bike Sharing System Works!

        Paris Bike Sharing System augments transit system for very low cost

        20,600 bicycles, 1,450 depots, built in 4 MONTHS!!!
        Costs less than 1 kilometer of LRT and has 120,000 users a day.

        There's an excellent video on the project here: http://www.streetfilms.org/

        Bicycles are free for the first 30 minutes and are availble 24 hoursa day. Perfect for getting home when transit shuts down at night. Even with Edmonton`s winters, IMHO a bicycle sharing system would work for 8 months of the year and even longer for heartier souls.

        "Vélib program are being entirely borne by a private company in exchange for advertising rights, a deal that is proving handsomely profitable for everyone involved - company, city and citizens."

        Mobility, walkability, community, saves money.

        Win, Win, Win, Win!


        Crunching Some Numbers on Paris Bike-Sharing Program
        WorldChanging Team July 16, 2008 11:33 AM
        By Adam Stein

        On the first anniversary of Vélib, the Times dishes up some stats on Paris’ popular bike-sharing program:
        * Riders took 27.5 million trips in the first year.
        * The current pace is about 120,000 trips per day.
        * The program includes 20,600 bikes.
        * The 1,450 self-service rental stations are available every 300 yards.
        * The bikes are heavy and expensive — $3,460 and 50 lbs — built to withstand theft, mistreatment, and heavy riding.
        * Nevertheless, 3,000 bikes have gone missing, about 15% of the total.

        Such programs, done right, do a fantastic job of boosting bicycle ridership. One thing they don’t necessarily do, however, is reduce a lot of carbon emissions. I built a simple model using the cited figures, and added in assumptions about average trip length, the number of displaced car miles, average fuel efficiency, etc. The results are necessarily rough, but I estimate the program is currently reducing maybe 40,000 metric tons of CO2 per year, about the amount saved by removing 5,700 cars from the road. (This suggests that it takes about 3.6 shared bicycles to replace a car.)

        The costs of the Vélib program are being entirely borne by a private company in exchange for advertising rights, a deal that is proving handsomely profitable for everyone involved - company, city and citizens. But it does suggest that bike-sharing shouldn’t be oversold as a solution to climate change, but instead should be seen as part of the movement toward green, livable cities that prioritize citizens over cars.
        Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 17-07-2008, 10:01 PM. Reason: added picture
        Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

        Comment


        • #5
          Used it, loved it, wish Edmonton had it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Kevin_Foster View Post
            Used it, loved it, wish Edmonton had it.
            Which would require less pot holes, no snow, warmer winter temperatures, more cycle paths and 75% of local drivers being shown how to give cycles room.

            This is a great idea, sooooooo not Edmonton.
            Edmonton, Capital of Alberta

            Comment


            • #7
              I would guess a higher population density, combined with more useful transit system would be a big factor as well. If I recall correctly, you can get almost anywhere in Paris quickly and pretty easily on transit. Combining that with bikes for the begin and end of the your trip would make it very attractive.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Kevin_Foster View Post
                Used it, loved it, wish Edmonton had it.
                Edmonton does have this service although not to the extent or scale as in Paris.

                http://www.peoplespedal.org

                I have seen one of their racks at Jasper Avenue and 110 Street. It usually has 4 bikes on it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by SteveB View Post
                  Originally posted by Kevin_Foster View Post
                  Used it, loved it, wish Edmonton had it.
                  Which would require less pot holes, no snow, warmer winter temperatures, more cycle paths and 75% of local drivers being shown how to give cycles room.

                  This is a great idea, sooooooo not Edmonton.
                  I see your point, but Paris has bad roads too, including their cobblestone streets. Riding on them can jar a filling or two loose. And, I find the majority of Edmonton's drivers to be pretty good regarding bicycles (with exceptions - see below), though a public information/education program is in order for drivers, riders, and pedestrians considering the growing number of cyclists.

                  40% of bike commuters continue to ride in the winter according to some study I can't find a link to. There are only a few days each winter that it's really a bad idea to ride. The keys are to dress for the weather, be highly visible (considering it's dark in the mornings and early evenings in Winter), ride slower, assume drivers aren't looking for you, and get studded tires.

                  I do agree this works a lot better in Paris than in Edmonton. And, according to the news I saw on this subject, the City has to have trucks to pick up bikes to redistribute them from popular destinations that get overcrowded (because you need a locking slot to park it, if it's full, you need to wait until someone leaves). I don't believe it will ever be nearly as popular here. Better for Edmonton to build on and improve the bike path system if they want to encourage bike commuting.

                  99st, for example, from Argyll (work) to Whitemud WHC (gym) has to be among the most dangerous routes I've ever taken here. The roads are narrow, there are no sidewalks or paths, the right hand sides of the right lanes are full of tire popping potholes, and there is a constant stream of trucks flying (!) by, many with no respect for cyclists. When I got to the gym, I was just happy to have survived. Still exploring alternate routes.

                  And regarding the education aspect, some better signs might help along the bike lane on Gateway South from Whyte to ?? Ave. Cars turning onto Gateway from the South routinely pull into the middle of the lane and stop, looking to their right for a break in traffic. They don't even think to look left. Travelling North in the bike/cab/bus lane I had to grab the brakes, lock 'em up, and skid to a stop, coming within a foot of slamming into a guy's nice BMW a few days ago, and he gave ME a dirty look, like I shouldn't be there. He's lucky it wasn't a bus! This happens almost daily. I resent having to slow to a crawl at the end of each block in case somebody's not looking. I wear a BRIGHT YELLOW jacket, and still, they pull out right in front of my path, with me feet away, and stop to check for traffic coming from the North. I'm seriously considering getting an air horn.

                  And don't get me started on the bad bicyclists out there. In many ways they are worse than the automobiles.

                  Anything to promote bicycle commuting would be good for Edmonton I think.
                  aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    how about just buying a bike?
                    My hope is that you can finally get rid of the anger in your heart, and fill it with peace, compassion, understanding, and a desire to uplift rather than suppress.

                    After all, we are all together on this home, this pale blue dot, the "only home we've ever known.”

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      That just has to be wrong $3,400 for one bike? We just bought a bike for my wife, a high end commuter bike and it only cost $800. I just can't see how that's possible.

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                      • #12
                        They are indeed fools if they paid $3400 for those bikes! They're not meant for the Tour de France for gosh sakes! Some French bicycle maker is making a fortune. Who is the purchaser that ok'd that I wonder? Kick-back anyone? Oh well, it's a private company putting up the cash.

                        There are durable commuter bikes for 1/10 of that price (though they are tanks). You can buy a real good quality Trek commuter for $500-$600. My new bike is really sweet (Specialized TriCross Comp), a lot nicer than the ones pictured, and cost around $2500 with pedals and fenders. Someone's getting ripped off there.

                        (by the way, a real high-end commuter bike can run $5000 or more)

                        Doesn't sound right to me. That's more than $71 Million for the bikes.

                        As RichardS suggests - buy a bike yourself (and 2 or 3 good locks).
                        Last edited by Jimbo; 18-07-2008, 02:03 PM.
                        aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          ^ but what if you want to tour a city that your not from?

                          If I was a tourist here, it would be AWESOME to explore the river valley via bike. Rent one for $10 and bring it back at any of the bike stations. Imagine being able to go from downtown, explore the river valley, go to whyte, head over to the zoo, and back? If thats not a cool idea..

                          sure it wouldnt work so well in Winter, but we can't shut down good ideas because we have winter :P Otherwise, we wouldnt have baseball, outdoor parks, etc. etc. etc.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jimbo View Post
                            They are indeed fools if they paid $3400 for those bikes! They're not meant for the Tour de France for gosh sakes! Some French bicycle maker is making a fortune. Who is the purchaser that ok'd that I wonder? Kick-back anyone? Oh well, it's a private company putting up the cash.

                            There are durable commuter bikes for 1/10 of that price (though they are tanks). You can buy a real good quality Trek commuter for $500-$600. My new bike is really sweet (Specialized TriCross Comp), a lot nicer than the ones pictured, and cost around $2500 with pedals and fenders. Someone's getting ripped off there.

                            Doesn't sound right to me. That's more than $71 Million for the bikes.
                            Yes, I agree that the bikes are pricey especially if you order 20,000 of them. These are not regular bikes as they have a card reader and secuity system built in. The parts were made in China, Hungary and several other countries and then assembled in France.


                            I read several other reports that give different bike costs as $3,400 USD, another 1,300 Euros ($2000 USD/CDN) another that said $1,300 USD report that stated 400 Euros ($640 USD/CDN)

                            So I really don`t know for sure what they really cost.

                            The first city to try this was Lyon, France and then Paris. New York is investigating this system as well. I think that the most important aspect was that they went big right away, starting with 10,000 bikes and then adding 10,000 more. This created the critical mass that gave people confidence in the system. The video states that there should one bike for every 200 people AND 15 bikes/station so in Edmonton we have about 750K pop. which works out to 3,750 bikes and 250 stations. That many bikes even at the highest price quoted ($3,400) would only be $12.7M which is about 10 Gateway Icicles or about 1/20th the cost of the 23rd Avenue intersection.

                            A 30-min use is free and people use them for shopping, commuting, as transit connections and to reduce auto use. Riders can select a one-day card for 1 Euro, a weekly card for 5 Euros or an annual card for 29 Euros. What a deal!

                            French Mayors Gerard Collomb in Lyon and Bertrand Delanoe in Paris have strongly supported Vélib, even ripping up 200km of streets to add new bike paths in an effort to reduce car traffic by 40% by 2020.

                            People with cars can park at one place, bike to several places and then head home again reducing congestion and searching for several parking places ( I immediately thought of South Edmonton Common).

                            Instead of taking a car to work or two or three buses, one can take a short bike trip to a major bus route for free, park the bike and take the bus and then take another bike to your destination. On you way back you can take a bike to the grocery store and make other errands.
                            If it snows you can take the bus home.

                            For all weather use, sections of the bikepaths could include lightweight covered walkways like they use at airports that are anchored or mounted on top of precast concrete barriers. Great for joggers & pedestrians as well.



                            Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SteveB View Post
                              Originally posted by Kevin_Foster View Post
                              Used it, loved it, wish Edmonton had it.
                              Which would require less pot holes, no snow, warmer winter temperatures, more cycle paths and 75% of local drivers being shown how to give cycles room.

                              This is a great idea, sooooooo not Edmonton.
                              I agree SteveB. Paris and other European cities it works very well, but our city's geography and weather is not really suitable.

                              Comment

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