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  • #16
    The McKeen article posted above says that the proposed industrial park will be out in the extreme NE near the borders of Fort Saskachewan. But I could see it expanding southward.

    It makes the most sense. Why should annexed city land slated for residences sit empty for 25 years while the south and west ends has been growing during that time? May as well do something with that land.

    And if the soil is that good then maybe it would make an excellent park!
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

    Comment


    • #17
      We can also scoop up the soil and sell it for profit.
      Edmonton first, everything else second.

      Comment


      • #18
        Mandel's Speech....

        Originally posted by Edmonton Journal

        Mandel's 10-year plan
        Attracting more industry, building public facilities key to booming city's future

        Gordon Kent
        The Edmonton Journal


        Friday, April 28, 2006



        CREDIT: Chris Schwarz, the Journal
        Mayor Stephen Mandel presents his annual state-of-the-city address Thursday to a luncheon crowd in the Shaw Conference Centre's newly opened Hall D.

        EDMONTON - Mayor Stephen Mandel outlined a long-term vision Thursday that includes attracting major new oil refineries or upgraders to Edmonton and spending up to $800 million improving community facilities.

        In his annual state-of-the-city speech, Mandel told a sold-out crowd of 1,300 that despite Alberta's current boom it is crucial to keep planning for the future.

        "City council understands ... that running a competitive, aggressive city means a lot more than it used to," he said to the crowd in the Shaw Conference Centre's new Hall D.

        "Sometimes we have to be bold enough to take some risks."

        Mandel wants to see a new industrial land strategy to "aggressively" market Edmonton as the location for $25-billion worth of refineries, oil upgraders and other projects being considered for the province.

        In the past, such businesses have usually located in outlying parts of the capital region, but the mayor wants to help draw them to undeveloped areas throughout the city by building roads, power, water and sewer lines, and transit links.

        While this will lead to competition for big projects, Mandel later insisted it won't lead to a "price war" with the city's neighbours.

        "Because we're doing something proactive, people say we're getting in a fight with the region," he told the Journal's editorial board.

        "On our part, we will do everything and anything to work with the region ... there's nothing we won't do, within reason, to find ways to build a strong region."

        The mayor also discussed a program called Vision 2016, aimed at upgrading attractions such as the Valley Zoo, constructing new recreation centres, installing artificial grass at two or three stadiums, and putting up needed cultural centres and other facilities over at least 10 years.

        "There's an awful lot of facilities that have not been built. I think the expectations are this will be a 1.5-million population (region) in the not-too-distant future." The work will cost an estimated $700 million to $800 million, he said.

        Mandel said he has spoken with provincial officials three or four times about having the government help pay for the work through an Alberta-wide community infrastructure fund, similar to the $3.3-billion in transportation grants that began last year.

        He would only say he's optimistic and the people with whom he discussed the idea were "very supportive."

        Provincial government staff with information about the scheme couldn't be reached for comment.

        The mayor is eyeing several other initiatives, including:

        - Improved access to downtown from the south side by extending Gateway Boulevard to the North Saskatchewan River and replacing the aging Walterdale Bridge with a new four-lane structure; the idea is now being studied.

        - A $70-million project to turn garbage headed to the Clover Bar landfill into gas that could be used to fuel an electrical plant; a pilot project on part of this process is expected to be completed by August.

        - Creating a volunteer Edmonton ambassador to Yellowknife, who could be announced as early as next week, as part of attempts to reach out to the North.

        - Setting up a $100-million venture capital fund using money from the city and other partners to provide seed money for fledgling companies, usually in the high-tech sector.

        Edmonton Chamber of Commerce president Martin Salloum said he was impressed with Mandel's suggestions, saying Albertans have "a real hunger for vision.

        "Now is the time to be spending money on a lot of this stuff, even though costs are high," Salloum said. "He's talking about the next 10 years. Generally speaking, city councillors tend to look at a three-year cycle at best."

        [email protected]

        © The Edmonton Journal 2006
        one columnsit's reaction...

        Originally posted by Edmonton Journal

        Mayor's fiscal fury more furtive this time

        Scott McKeen
        The Edmonton Journal


        Friday, April 28, 2006


        Last year, Mayor Stephen Mandel talked crap in his state-of-the-city address. No crap this time. Only some strategic bull.

        Mandel was much more the diplomat Thursday in his annual address. If you expected a repeat of last year's earthy language -- Mandel to developers: Edmonton is sick of "crap" architecture -- you were disappointed. Instead, Mandel gave a fairly standard speech about good things done and good things ahead. His target this year coulda/shoulda been regional municipalities, in particular Strathcona County, which refuse to work with Edmonton on issues of fiscal substance. Make no mistake. Behind the scenes, Mandel and his councillors are furious with Strathcona County's refinery-fuelled egocentricism. Estimates are the region could create a pool of $150 million annually for metro projects if it equalized its taxes and shared the wealth. Millions more could be saved if services like policing and transit were shared.

        But Strathcona County, in particular, won't play.

        But Mandel chose his words carefully on the regional front and talked generally about a made-in-Edmonton industrial strategy. City Hall is preparing plans to chase some of the $25 billion in industrial projects coming down the pipe.

        A new industrial park and strategy will put Edmonton squarely in competition with outlying communities that have enjoyed windfall industrial taxes for decades. The future projects represent hundreds of millions of dollars in annual taxes to whichever municipality grabs them.

        Mandel denies the move will create a fight with the neighbours. It's not us versus them, he said. Yeah, right.

        Mandel, instead, waxed diplomatic about how all of us in the region visit each other's stores and festivals, how we work together, visit each other and cheer for the same hockey team.

        The latter was, of course, a reference to the Edmonton Oilers, not the Alberta Capital Region Oilers. The name is apt, given that Edmonton taxpayers subsidize the Oilers lease at Rexall Place by $2.5 million each year and outlying taxpayers pay diddly.

        If that sounds petty, well, good. Some Deep Throat put an interesting piece of correspondence in my mailbox this week, a recent newsletter from Strathcona County Councillor Alan Dunn to his ward residents.

        Dunn accuses Edmonton of "sabre rattling" on regional issues and claims Strathcona County is the aw-shucks amiable neighbour. Dunn portrays Edmonton as an evil empire, out to take over the region -- then the world.

        "Many of their politicians and administrators harbour a secret dream of a vast Northern Alberta Empire with Edmonton at its centre -- a kind of latter-day Rome," writes Dunn.

        His hallucination continues with a vision of hapless metro citizens being subjected to the whims and cruelties of a negligent, decadent Rome, er, Edmonton.

        "Our services are already superior to those offered by Edmonton," writes Dunn. "We run our municipality more efficiently; we keep tighter rein on the books; we have done a better job of planning growth; and we have not allowed our infrastructure to fall into decay."

        He neglects to mention how much easier it is to be "efficient" with all those industrial taxes from refinery row, which sits just inside Strathcona County. Without that windfall the county would be singing the infrastructure blues, too.

        Dunn doesn't blame all of Edmonton's woes on its political leaders. Well, not completely. It's a size thing, he says. Once cities surpass populations of "about 100,000 to 200,000" they become inefficient, he says.

        "Edmonton has long since exceeded this limit and suffers from the usual big city ills of a crumbling inner-city infrastructure, traffic, debt and crime. And let's be clear: these ills have been brought on by Edmonton itself, not by any other neighbouring municipality or the province or the feds."

        Dunn goes on to say we in Edmonton know it's our fault. Instead of admitting this and taking personal responsibility, we want to pillage and plunder the good citizens of Strathcona County.

        "We will, however, not be bullied into submission to Edmonton imperialism," concluded the county councillor.

        Mandel rattled no sabres Thursday. The mayor sounded nothing like a Caesar.

        Mind you, he is scheduled to meet today with the region, including Strathcona County. Given Edmonton's plan to lure industrial projects away from metro counties, I suspect the crap will hit the fan.

        [email protected]

        © The Edmonton Journal 2006
        President and CEO - Airshow.

        Comment


        • #19
          I would so love to see the entire text of Dunn's little letter.
          President and CEO - Airshow.

          Comment


          • #20
            What was one of the Stickmen's anti-Riemer slogans? "Edmonton City Council is the best advertising Calgary has ever had" - something like that? How about a similar campaign in Strathcona County targetting their municipal leaders?
            “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

            Comment


            • #21
              What I find funny is the logic here. He blames Edmonton's woes on political leadership and a bit on becoming over 100,000, yet SP wants to make another urban node to grow that big? Will they then not, by his definition, become inefficient and laiden with crime?

              Oh, I get it, the magical HAMLET FAIRY will protect them...they are not a city....
              President and CEO - Airshow.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by RichardS
                I never thought of that clay as good farmland. My type of soil is a bit more black. NW Alberta (GP, PR, etc) I thought had the best farmland.
                It's not clay, but a clay based soil. One of the oddities of glaciation that it left us with a grey soil richer than the best blacks. Not all that suprising I guess, it's just glorified river silt. Back in '86 whe my yard got flooded and covered with yellow-brown NS silt I had bumber crops for several years from the same plants that were dying in "#1 growers mix"

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Sonic Death Monkey
                  It makes the most sense. Why should annexed city land slated for residences sit empty for 25 years while the south and west ends has been growing during that time? May as well do something with that land.
                  Something is being done with it. Among other things the best seed potatoes in the world are grown here... the taters that the folks elsewhere in the world use to plant their fields to turn into eating potatoes. Of course spuds aren't glamourous like vineyards, so the fact that the best in the world are grown here doesn't get much attention.

                  Anyway, like I said... I'd make the same decision. Just pointing out that not everyone opposed to something is a NIMBY. If the 'burbs would play ball we wouldn't have to develop that land and I wouldn't support it. As is, I look it like expropriating someone's home... has to be done, but I wish there were another way.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by RichardS
                    What I find funny is the logic here. He blames Edmonton's woes on political leadership and a bit on becoming over 100,000, yet SP wants to make another urban node to grow that big? Will they then not, by his definition, become inefficient and laiden with crime?

                    Oh, I get it, the magical HAMLET FAIRY will protect them...they are not a city....
                    The sad this is how many people out there feel exactly like that. And even worse how many are Police officers, EMT's and other people you would want to have a positive view of the City. Not people that think the city is evil and corrupt by simple virtue of being a city.

                    ( And yes, I do have an issue with people that disparage the city as a vile dangerous place, going so far as to tell their wife and kids not to come into town, while wearing an Edmonton Uniform and collecting an Edmonton paycheque. )

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by RichardS
                      I would so love to see the entire text of Dunn's little letter.
                      This is the closest I could get...

                      http://www.strathcona.ab.ca/NR/rdonl...d6-May2006.pdf
                      Edmonton first, everything else second.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Hmmmmmmm.......


                        Originally posted by edmonton journal
                        Mayor urges regional teamwork
                        Politicians agree municipal umbrella group could work more effectively to attract industry, develop services and lobby senior levels of government

                        Mike Sadava with files from Allyson Jeffs
                        The Edmonton Journal


                        Monday, May 01, 2006


                        EDMONTON - Mayor Stephen Mandel's plan for the city to be more aggressive in attracting industry has led to kudos from regional politicians.

                        But he also says the current umbrella organization for the 23 municipalities in the capital region is not working.

                        Mandel attended the annual general meeting of the Alberta Capital Region Alliance on Friday, and in an interview later said several regional politicians came up to him and congratulated him on his state-of-the-city speech, in which he pledged to focus on attracting more industry to Edmonton.

                        The city doesn't want to take industry away from the regional municipalities, he said. With a potential of $25 billion worth of refineries, oil upgraders and other heavy industry over the next decade, it is natural for Edmonton to want some of it, although "by no means all of it."

                        But the opportunities would be greater with more co-operation among the municipalities, "and if we could come together we would be a far more powerful force than we are," he said.

                        County of Strathcona Mayor Cathy Olesen, who was elected vice-chair of the alliance, said she was not threatened by Mandel's speech. Municipalities need to find a balance between residential, commercial and industrial development, she said.

                        "As some communities grow, the balance gets out of kilter and I think they (Edmonton) are just putting some more energy into the industrial component, and I think that's good. That's healthy."

                        There are no negative implications for Strathcona, she said.

                        "There's so much development around. Anything that happens is good for the region."

                        Spruce Grove Mayor Ken Scott agrees the positive effects of development in one municipality often spread to its neighbours.

                        "To me it's a win-win situation," he said. "We are in Parkland County, as such, so the City of Spruce Grove benefits from any industrial use that goes into, say, Acheson (Industrial Area), which is on Highway 60 there. I think everybody competes to try to get what is best for their area."

                        Fort Saskatchewan Mayor Jim Sheasgreen says if Edmonton attracts a major development, his city "can certainly attract some complementary service industries to support the work of a large industry or upgrader. We see definite opportunities in that regard."

                        Olesen thinks the alliance is working. She said one of the successes of the group was that 22 municipalities got together and urged the province to build Anthony Henday Drive, Edmonton's ring road.

                        The other municipalities all have transportation problems, but Henday is good for the entire region.

                        She thinks the alliance would work better if it became more project-focused, such as dealing with solid waste by using new technology.

                        Scott likened the organization to a family. "In any family you've got differences," he said. "The thing of it is, to bring the differences to the table and have a discussion as to what you feel would be beneficial."

                        Sheasgreen anticipates some positive discussion among alliance members regarding issues such as governance -- in particular, whether the consensus model of decision-making should be modified.

                        At present, if "one player at the table" does not favour a particular issue or project, it may not go forward, he said.

                        Other issues on the table for consideration include how to better co-ordinate regional planning and waste management and how best to present a united voice when lobbying provincial and federal governments for common needs, he said.

                        [email protected]

                        © The Edmonton Journal 2006
                        President and CEO - Airshow.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Luckily for everyone there are varied choices in where you want to live in the Edmonton region. Some people want to live in a smaller city where there aren't as many big city problems but, lack some services, others want to live downtown and have all the services they want within easy walking distance but have to deal with more of the big city problems.

                          I am undecided on whether or not St. Albert should be annexed by Edmonton. I know there are those in St. Albert who fear losing the City they love and therefore decided to make a home in but, there are obvious economic opportunities to being part of the City of Edmonton. I think if people in Edmonton didn't have so much of the "if they won't join us beat them" (sounds a lot like U.S. foreign policy) mentailty people might more easily concider closer ties or annexation.

                          I think we need to stop making threats etc. and start working on how to make the whole region stronger.

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