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  • #16
    ^ I'll come back in mid 2012 to quote your post. I'll add on (in mid 2012) just how many more workers are required compared to the 06-07 boom.
    Building things in phases? Nothing new there.
    A people that elect corrupt politicians, imposters, thieves and traitors are not victims, but accomplices.

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    • #17
      yup... concur Med. I have heard that employment in proposed mega projects will require 20-30% more labour than the peak of the boom.


      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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      • #18
        One thing I suspect has not been investigated enough is the effect of segregated land use promoting oversupply and therefore contributing to bubbles.

        Perhaps if all neighborhoods were always built with a mix of housing types -- from McMansions to starter homes to row-units to multi-storey multi-unit rentals, and on the same streets/blocks wherever possible, the (enforced, perhaps) availability of choice would channel demand to its natural spread.

        In other cultures the spatial separation between "rich", "middle" and "low" has generally been much less than here and now. Do square miles upon square miles of all all-rich or all-middle or even all-poor development create oversupply in the end and an overbubbling until the end is forced to come?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by NanO View Post
          yup... concur Med. I have heard that employment in proposed mega projects will require 20-30% more labour than the peak of the boom.
          One reason for the shortage of workers will be the retirement of baby boomers. Baby boomers started in 1946 so this year is the start of these 65 year olds retiring. I should imagine a fair amount of them may be moving to warmer climates or downsizing their homes. If so, I cannot see the shortage of homes to buy or rent being as bad as it was during the last boom. Developers and condo builders should be targeting these new baby boomers to move into multiple dwellings.
          Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by alex69 View Post
            One thing I suspect has not been investigated enough is the effect of segregated land use promoting oversupply and therefore contributing to bubbles.

            Perhaps if all neighborhoods were always built with a mix of housing types -- from McMansions to starter homes to row-units to multi-storey multi-unit rentals, and on the same streets/blocks wherever possible, the (enforced, perhaps) availability of choice would channel demand to its natural spread.
            I fully agree with this. developers should be forced to do this more and not just the token minuscule percent of affordable housing they are required now.
            be offended! figure out why later...

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            • #21
              The market argument is a bit of a moot point too. I mean the very nature of Zoning is a direct influence on the market.
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              • #22
                ^true, if you think about it, those converting greenfield to city by changing zoning, or lobying to become part of the City, are actually trying to profit by distorting the market / seeking to change it, rather than playing "by the rules" by using their land for the market that it was intended (e.g. farming).

                Accordingly, there is no reason why City residents represented by City Council should feel any obligation to accomodate them, unless there are some significant benefits to the City. At a minimun, I would think land for social housing / drug rehabilitation / mental health, etc., to make a more even playing field throuout the city, should be part of those requirements.
                Last edited by moahunter; 16-05-2011, 04:13 PM.

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