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Calgary Flood Aftermath

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  • #61
    more than 100 buildings may have to be demolished due to flooding ??


    http://www.theobserver.ca/2013/06/29...-be-demolished
    Edmonton Rocks Rocks Rocks

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    • #62
      It will be more than that..
      "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Gemini View Post
        Originally posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
        Gemini: I believe the main issue for Nenshi was that there was no communication from CP. He and the Calgary first response people had shut down half the city due to this issue and CP wasn't returning his calls. Then he had to stand in front of the media and try to explain what was going on while CP stonewalled. He communicated what information he had, explained why he had so little, and expressed his frustration about why the City knew so little. By all rights it should have been the head of CP standing in front the microphones explaining why his company was potentially adding calamity to disaster.

        While CP had inspected the upper structure they understandably had not inspected the piers. They also should know that the bridge was not built into bedrock and that the piers were at risk. Even with 18 structural inspections they should not have been running hazardous cargo over that bridge until they knew the piers had not been damaged. They did run trains and the result was City workers risking their lives to pull CP's *** out of the fire plus even more lost income for Calgary businesses and workers.
        Lack of communication is never a good thing in times of crisis.
        It was stated that CP rail had left those trains on the bridge to add more weight to it when the river was running high. No one expected the flood and aftermath would have been that great. As people had been warned not to go within 300 metres of river banks CP workers could not go and move the trains. They could not send divers down to check the piers as it was too dangerous with the fast running water. Seems to me they were stuck between a rock and a hard place. Nenshi venting his spleen at CP is a bit premature. He should wait to hear the whole story of why the trains weren't moved. Let's face it, if he had of insisted they be moved and then CP staff were swept away by the river it would have been a whole different story. If he looks around the City of Calgary he will find this is not the only crises to hone in on.
        I don't know, if they inspected the bridge 18 times and did not inspect the foundations, did they really do their job?
        Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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        • #64
          ^They probably did as good a job as the C of C did on their bridges. Let's face it, the C of C had lots of their roads, bridges, intersections compromised due to the flooding. It's easy to divert the heat away from yourself and divert it too CP Rail. Some C of C structures did not stand up that well. Maybe they should be looking after their own building codes rather than focus on one bridge.
          Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Gemini View Post
            ^They probably did as good a job as the C of C did on their bridges. Let's face it, the C of C had lots of their roads, bridges, intersections compromised due to the flooding. It's easy to divert the heat away from yourself and divert it too CP Rail. Some C of C structures did not stand up that well. Maybe they should be looking after their own building codes rather than focus on one bridge.
            Yes lets not focus on the fact that bridge had dangerous goods on it, and it could have completely collapsed making a toxic mess of the river and more issue for the city good logic there gemini.......

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            • #66
              In times of emergencies sh*t happens all the time. If the C of C had of had issues with the bridge and the goods that were/are transported on it, it should have fired of a letter to CP years ago. Not squawk after the fact. That goes for all cities/municipalities that have CP tracks or bridges going through their turf. Know what the policies are before calamity happens not after the fact.
              Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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              • #67
                The big difference between the CP bridge and the CofC bridges is that the CP bridge was not built to bedrock. So while neither of them could inspect the piers underwater only the CP bridge had the potential to be seriously compromised, which it was. Inspections need to cover all potential problems, they knew, or should have known, that the piers could be compromised but opened the bridge anyways.

                "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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                • #68
                  Flooding may have unearthed dangers at former Calgary artillery range

                  "Last month’s flood may have stirred up some long-hidden dangers in a former artillery training range.

                  A suspected military shell was found by a man out walking Monday night in the Weaselhead area of Glenmore Park in southwest Calgary.

                  The area was cordoned off and the police bomb squad was called in."

                  http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...211/story.html

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                  • #69
                    "Temporary Neighbourhood in High River Accepting Families"

                    Originally posted by CTV
                    A residential neighbourhood set up to house High River residents displaced by the flooding is steadily growing. Up to 60 families have moved into Saddlebrook and there are now over 400 people living in the community. “This is a positive step forward for these families who have been out of their homes for so long. Moving into the Saddlebrook neighbourhood will give them some stability and a sense of community while they rebuild their homes and make decisions about the future,” said Rick Fraser, Associate Minister of Regional Recovery and Reconstruction.

                    Photos



                    Family units have two beds (or a double bed, bunk bend, or built-in crib, depending on family needs). They also have a private washroom and shower, furnace, hot water tank, storage area, desk, and a television.

                    Meals are available at three different restaurants. Residents also have access to recreation and playground areas and well as housekeeping and onsite medical support.

                    The neighbourhood will reach capacity of 1,200 residents when complete.

                    Residents who move into Saddlebrook will be able to live there rent-free for 90 days so they have time to make alternate arrangements.

                    Saddlebrook is the first temporary neighbourhood to open.

                    Temporary housing is also open in the Siksika First Nation until a temporary neighbourhood can be built there.
                    The province is also considering temporary neighbourhoods near the M.D. of Bighorn, Calgary, and the Stoney Nakoda First Nation.

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
                      The big difference between the CP bridge and the CofC bridges is that the CP bridge was not built to bedrock. So while neither of them could inspect the piers underwater only the CP bridge had the potential to be seriously compromised, which it was. Inspections need to cover all potential problems, they knew, or should have known, that the piers could be compromised but opened the bridge anyways.
                      Imagine the bureaucratic nightmare if a train company had to apply different bridge standards for every municipality, county, etc. that it runs through? Just a make work program, this is an example where Federal law is a good thing. In respect of this bridge, what I find interesting is that the adjoining CP bridge (of same vintage - CN has a separate bridge 10 meters or so away) is still running oil trains over it, they are even stopping right on top (I am guessing for for track switches, or perhaps waiting for additional cars as close to the yard). I'm not convinced it was a pier issue at all, to my untrained eyes it looks more like the bridge just sagged between the piers, a coincidence it happened during the flood. Not that I'm an engineer though.
                      Last edited by moahunter; 10-08-2013, 02:50 PM.

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                      • #71
                        Lol^

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by moahunter View Post
                          I'm not convinced it was a pier issue at all, to my untrained eyes it looks more like the bridge just sagged between the piers, a coincidence it happened during the flood. Not that I'm an engineer though.
                          According to the reports at the time and since the failure was caused by the sagging if one of the piers. Where it sagged there is a pier, however in the pictures it's hard to see because it's partially submerged.

                          "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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                          • #73
                            ^oh, I think I get it now. There were two piers, one for the South track, one for the North. The South sagged (which we can't easily see), but the North didn't, hence they can still run trains over the North. Weird.

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