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Double Decker buses for Edmonton?

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  • #31
    Originally posted by sundance View Post
    London is replacing it's old Routemaster busses

    With these
    That is not a Routemaster RM, it is an RTW which predated the RM.
    “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Hilman View Post
      We already use articulated buses, there is no need for double deckers.
      Yes, they are more accessable for disabled people and seniors when crowds get busy. Lets face it, once most people get over the novelty of being up high, they will choose to sit on the easier / more convinent / better security (have a bus driver in sight), bottom floor.
      Last edited by moahunter; 25-03-2011, 12:05 PM.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by moahunter View Post
        Originally posted by Hilman View Post
        We already use articulated buses, there is no need for double deckers.
        Yes, they are more accessable for disabled people and seniors when crowds get busy. Lets face it, once most people get over the novelty of being up high, they will choose to sit on the easier / more convinent / better security (have a bus driver in sight), bottom floor.
        I can't speak for Edmonton, but double-deck buses have been hugely popular in Victoria. The Victoria Regional Transit System operates 52 double-deck buses (out of a fleet of 200 buses).

        Before the introduction of the double-deck bus, many trips had to be double and triple headed to handled the loads - especially on the Victoria to the university and Victoria to the ferry terminal trips.

        The buses are low floor with two wheel-chair positions, two bike racks, and seat 84 passengers - 33 downstairs and 51 upstairs (120 including standing passengers). The buses are air-conditioned.

        The upstairs is monitored by the driver using a colour CCTV mounted above the window for easy reference. This camera also switches to the rear door when operated.

        I ride the double-deckers daily to and from work. The seat arrangement is such that there is a lot of leg room on the top deck - much more than on a single-deck bus. The ride is smooth and quieter, probably because on the top deck you're further from the engine. The Victoria buses have reading lights above each seat, but that is because in Victoria the bus interior lights are normally turned out or dimmed at night due to the lack of street lighting on many streets the buses run on.

        Compared to the articulated, they seat more, but articulated can carry more standing. It is possible to stand on the upper deck, and people do it when the bus gets full, but there isn't much headroom, so it is not comfortable if you're over 5'8". The lower deck is much more suitable for standing.

        The double-decker does take longer to load than the articulated - so I would not recommend a double-decker for rapid transit.

        You are correct that no shorter trips, people are more likely to stay downstairs and you do get a crowded lower deck and seats upstairs still available.

        You'll find the double-deckers on the following routes in Victoria:
        Urban Routes
        4 Victoria - University of Victoria via Hillside
        14 Victoria General Hospital to University of Victoria via Victoria (Victoria's busiest route)
        21 Victoria to Interurban Campus via Interurban
        26 Dockyard to University of Victoria via Uptown

        Suburban Routes
        50 Victoria to Langford via Trans-Canada Highway
        51 Langford to University of Victoria via Trans-Canada Highway
        61 Victoria to Sooke via Trans-Canada Highway and Highway 14
        70 Express - Victoria to Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal via Pat Bay Highway calling at Sidney Centre
        71 Victoria to MacDonald Park via Saanichton
        72 Victoria to Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal via Saanichton and Sidney
        73 Victoria to Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal via Saanichton and West Sidney
        80 Express - University of Victoria to Swartz Bay Ferry Terminal via Pat Bay Highway
        ETS Trolley Buses - 1939 to 2010 - R.I.P.

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        • #34
          One route that a double decker would be good for here in Edmonton is the #15, express bus from millwoods to Kingsway.
          LRT is our future, time to push forward.

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          • #35
            Seem quite successful but now tragic as needed safety improvements. From pictures I’d say don’t put low roof bus shelters (which likely have horizontal beams that would spear a bus.)
            Egan: OC Transpo sees no need to pull double-deckers or alter Transitway shelters | Ottawa Citizen

            The TSB called the need for change “urgent.”

            OC seems to love its double-deckers, which cost roughly $1 million apiece. Following a two-year pilot, the first one went into regular service in 2012 and the transit authority now has 133 in its fleet. They are workhorses, with seating for 90-some passengers and standing room for 14 more, but with a relatively small wheelbase. They are fairly cheap to run, or in transit-speak, have the “lowest unit costs per passenger trip” in the fleet.

            Nor is OC particularly troubled by the TSB claim that front upper-level passengers have little real protection.

            “If there was any indication, or any evidence or anything to suggest they were unsafe,” said OC Transpo general manager John Manconi on Monday afternoon, “I would pull the fleet. But we don’t have any of that evidence.”

            https://ottawacitizen.com/news/local...itway-shelters

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            • #36
              I know Sherwood Park Transit runs double deckers to and from Downtown and the U of A. As far as I know, there is no where on their routes they could run into something. According to strathcona.com the buses are 4.27 m, or 14' tall. If a driver were to get confused or malicious, Maker forbid, and go off route, would the upper deck clear Ford Hall, the High Level, or the downtown pedways, or would it hit?

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              • #37
                The Strathcona County buses would have no problem clearing Ford Hall or any of the downtown pedways, but they can't fit through the High Level.
                “Son, one day this will be an iconic structure shaping Edmonton’s skyline.”

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                • #38
                  There's no hight clearance signs on the arena so I assume it's above the minimum necessary. The high level warning signs list a clearance of 10'6" so it would not clear. The pedway to Manulife over 101 street has no warnings but the one at the mall says the clearance of the curb lane only is 4.8m or 15'9". A double decker would clear but based on the waning signs, I'd say that the minimum clearance without a sign is around 16"

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                  • #39
                    ^
                    ^^
                    Thanks! The High Level is far enough away from the Strathcona double deckers' routes that even an extremely confused driver shouldn't be going near it, and anyone with malicious intent could do more harm slamming a bus full speed into a building. What happened in Ottawa hopefully won't happen here with the Strathcona double deckers, or any that could be purchased in the future by ETS. :knocks on wood:

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                    • #40
                      I think the double decker would be nice for some express routes as well as some busy and high congestion routes. #4 on Whyte ave would be a nice place for DD buses.
                      LRT is our future, time to push forward.

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                      • #41
                        ^
                        As cool as double deckers are, I've talked to ETS, and they're not planning on adding any to the fleet. They prefer to keep the fleet all New Flyers, which doesn't make a double decker, and they prefer the handicapped accessibility of low floor articulated buses.

                        If you want to ride a double decker, your ETS ticket or pass allows you to ride Strathcona transit within Edmonton for free. Route 411 in particular makes a nice MacEwan/CBD to Capilano Mall express-like route, especially if you need to get to the Capilano Walmart.

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                        • #42
                          Edmonton would probably have to build higher barns to handle them. Personally I'd like to see some double deck articulated busses, but very few have ever been made
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neoplan_Jumbocruiser

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