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Would Legalization Turn Edmonton Back Into Redmonton?

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  • #16
    An adult choice? How about an illegal choice? I wish I could be an adult and make decisions that are illegal. ( nothing against pro choice, I find this type of justification very interesting mostly because not very many hot topics get illegal approvals endorsed like drugs)

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    • #17
      It was once illegal to be gay. To be black and sit at the front of the bus...

      I always laugh at people who live their life black/white right/wrong illegal/legal

      It must be so easy to live by someone elses moral code rather than have tough conversations with yourself to why things are the way they are.

      A tough conversation I had to have with myself is 'should Cannabis be illegal'

      What is just isnt always legal and what is legal isnt always just
      youtube.com/BrothersGrim
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      • #18
        Originally posted by Komrade View Post
        It was once illegal to be gay. To be black and sit at the front of the bus...
        Yes, because that's totally the same thing.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Swillv8 View Post
          If the government was smart we should put any restrictions in place before legalization.

          Like workers should be able to work in an influence free workplace.(bring on more a&d testing for jobs)

          Also the insurance companies should get some healthy clauses for themselves for increased life insurance policies and such

          Better police enforcement/ detection for high and driving
          I think this is both wise and reasonable.

          People who think that legalization or decriminalization of marijuana would be totally consequence-free are kidding themselves.

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          • #20
            Personally, I think it should be totally legal, with the government out of the issue entirely, with the exception of impaired driving laws and rules about selling to children.
            Companies would develop brands and distribution chains, the government would collect a sales tax.
            It would be illegal to sell to minors and tests would be developed for impairment.
            Keep it simple and free.
            As far as this spurring underage use, it's currently easier for a 15 year old in school to buy dope than it is for him to buy cigarettes or alcohol.

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            • #21
              I feel that way about all drugs.

              I am against decriminalization/legalization of marijuana if it means we still have a pointless "war on drugs" for everything else people choose to do recreationally and which criminals produce and sell.

              Let's talk about legalization of all of it, or none of it. Or drug laws are pretty wishy-washy now, and they will be just as wishy-washy without marijuana being illegal.

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              • #22
                I think legalization would be a good thing. We would just have to be careful not to be hasty. Make sure we dot all the "I"s and cross all the "T"s when it comes down to all the details. If implemented correctly it could be a really good thing for this country. If implemented incorrectly things could get worse.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by MrOilers View Post
                  I feel that way about all drugs.

                  I am against decriminalization/legalization of marijuana if it means we still have a pointless "war on drugs" for everything else people choose to do recreationally and which criminals produce and sell.

                  Let's talk about legalization of all of it, or none of it. Or drug laws are pretty wishy-washy now, and they will be just as wishy-washy without marijuana being illegal.
                  Yeah. Maybe it is time to open up the debate to make alcohol, caffeine and any other mind altering drugs illegal.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by KC View Post
                    Maybe it is time to open up the debate to make alcohol, caffeine and any other mind altering drugs illegal.
                    Well, every time people start debating about illicit drugs they automatically point to the damage that alcohol causes (as if that has anything to do with different drugs). T

                    he fact that alcohol does so much damage is an argument for reconsidering our approach to alcohol policies, not an argument for legalizing more drugs.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by MrOilers View Post
                      Originally posted by KC View Post
                      Maybe it is time to open up the debate to make alcohol, caffeine and any other mind altering drugs illegal.
                      Well, every time people start debating about illicit drugs they automatically point to the damage that alcohol causes (as if that has anything to do with different drugs). T

                      he fact that alcohol does so much damage is an argument for reconsidering our approach to alcohol policies, not an argument for legalizing more drugs.
                      I agree, I seriously think we should reconsider our approach to alcohol. (More regulation as to it's use and not bringing back prohibition.) However, it's about rational and reasonable laws across all such products based on the same principles, rights and responsibilities and impact on those involved.


                      Up in Smoke
                      The Legalization of Marijuana
                      By Alison Vekshin | Updated Nov 5, 2014

                      excerpt:

                      "Advocates in the U.S. successfully compared pot with alcohol, arguing that legalization would allow for better monitoring of an industry that has long existed underground. It also provides tax revenue, and Colorado collected $29.8 million in the first eight months. The growing number of Americans who acknowledge that they have smoked pot include President Barack Obama, who has spoken out about how poor and minority kids account for a disproportionate share of those punished for its use. About half a million people were arrested for marijuana possession in the U.S. in 2012, about the same number as for all violent crimes combined. Nineteen U.S. states and several countries have passed laws decriminalizing possession, so that getting caught with a small amount is treated as a minor offense. Critics say easing marijuana laws exposes children and teenagers to the drug and could lead to an increase in drugged driving. ..."

                      http://www.bloombergview.com/quickta...go-up-in-smoke
                      Last edited by KC; 06-11-2014, 07:03 AM.

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