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Do you support Universal Health Care?

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  • Do you support Universal Health Care?

    I'm just curious as I have noticed many threads that end up discussing this. Why not have one channeled directly towards it's discussion?

    What is your stance on it? Would you like it expanded, reduced, what? Why do you or don't you like it? I'd just like to see other peoples perspectives right now.

    My belief:

    I am in strong support of it. I believe no one should be left behind in terms of health and whatnot. Nobodies health or body should have a price tag. No one should starve or die because they can't pay hospital bills.

    People have a right to health in my mind...because it is a human right to live, and good health is a good part of that.

    I think Canada's system should actually be expanded further, to include anything not considered "cosmetic", so that means including dental, prescription drugs, massage therapy for medical reasons, vision care, etc.

    But I know many are in strong support of bringing it down or are just against it. Some opinions could change, but many are set in their ways. So, I think a private system through insurance and out of pocket payments should be offerred too. They wouldn't be able to play people like they do in the US though. And it would only work in private hospitals, thus not disrupting a public system. This will keep people against it from bringing down a public system as they would happily have their system of preference. That being said, I don't believe at all in a private health care network, but I think it's needed in order to sustain the public system and get whiners to be quiet.

    But with a public system, nobody would have to go into debt due to medical reasons or whatever. Everybody can be given care free of charge (well, there are taxes...), and that I believe is right.

    So what's your belief?
    32
    I believe in a publicly funded universal system
    71.88%
    23
    I believe in a private corporate system with payments
    0.00%
    0
    I believe in a mixture of both
    28.13%
    9
    I believe in another option (state)
    0.00%
    0
    Last edited by edmontonenthusiast; 10-02-2010, 08:27 PM.
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  • #2
    The U.S. is about the only developed country that does not have Universal health care. The only thing special about Canada's system is that this is probably the only developed country on earth that doesn't let people spend their own money on health if they choose to.

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    • #3
      ^I'm guessing you believe in a mixed system?
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      • #4
        Originally posted by moahunter View Post
        The U.S. is about the only developed country that does not have Universal health care. The only thing special about Canada's system is that this is probably the only developed country on earth that doesn't let people spend their own money on health if they choose to.
        ...If you had a topnotch system why would you choose to?

        Though if you wish to spend more money you can right now. There are plenty of private clinics in Canada happy to take your cash.
        Last edited by andy8244; 10-02-2010, 08:53 PM.

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        • #5
          ^Why do people choose different houses, or different hotels, or different dentists? Why can't I choose to become a member of a non-profit hospital in Canada? I could in "socialist" Europe (which has better healthcare for amount spent than north america), but not in "government knows best" (unless you are exempt as a powerful premier) Canada.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by edmontonenthusiast View Post
            ^I'm guessing you believe in a mixed system?
            I support a publically funded universal system as well, who doesn't outside the U.S.?

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            • #7
              ^Yeah, as well, meaning both. Don't kid yourself, many Americans do support universal health care.

              ^^The US may spend boat loads more, but I haven't seen stats that show Canada spends much if any more than Europeans for health care systems. So not all North America.
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              • #8
                Originally posted by edmontonenthusiast View Post
                ^Yeah, as well, meaning both. Don't kid yourself, many Americans do support universal health care.

                ^^The US may spend boat loads more, but I haven't seen stats that show Canada spends much if any more than Europeans for health care systems. So not all North America.
                As a % of it's GDP Canada is around 15th in the world for it's total expenditure on health care and we languish at 25th in the world for the number of hospital beds.

                Incidentally, as it turns out Canada is also 4th in the world for per capita spending on private health care.

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                • #9
                  The question is kind of loaded. You can have a publicly funded system that includes private delivery. We have that right now when it comes to general practise, diagnostics and lab testing.

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                  • #10
                    Very poorly stated question in the first post.

                    I support universal care, but disagree with a 100% public system.

                    I think the most efficient and best system is universal, but with mixed public and private delivery.
                    Last edited by MrOilers; 11-02-2010, 08:46 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by moahunter View Post
                      Why can't I choose to become a member of a non-profit hospital in Canada? I could in "socialist" Europe (which has better healthcare for amount spent than north america), but not in "government knows best" (unless you are exempt as a powerful premier) Canada.
                      In Canada you can buy anything your heart desires... except better health care.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by MrOilers View Post
                        Very poorly stated question in the first post.

                        I support universal care, but disagree with a 100% public system.

                        I think the most efficient and best system is universal, but with mixed public and private delivery.
                        I agree with this. Although I would still closely regulate private industry and have restrictions on when and why it can be the second option. I wouldnt want a free for all, the richest get the best system.
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                        • #13
                          ^my experience (from living in other countries), is that the biggest benefits of a second tier private health system, are for people who work in high risk industries, as their employer will cover the costs with a view to getting them back to work sooner if something happens. Effectivley, the user of needed extra health care, pays more - space is freed up in the public universal system.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JasonR View Post
                            The question is kind of loaded. You can have a publicly funded system that includes private delivery. We have that right now when it comes to general practise, diagnostics and lab testing.
                            Yes, but our public system is available to anyone of the public. That is not true in a private system. If you don't have the money or the insurance, you're out of luck in a private system (most notably the USA).
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                            • #15
                              I don't like monopolies, especially when it comes to my health, or my loved ones.

                              I don't want to be held for ransom during a strike (I had a bad experience involving my dad having a 2nd heart attack in his room [after having a heart attack on the operating table because anesthetic for a totally unrelated operation was administered improperly] and the nurse doing some sort of "work to rule" sulking thing during strike talks - she wouldn't even look at me or acknowledge my presence when I went to the desk to tell her - he was having a heart attack for god's sake!), and I want as many options as I can get.

                              A single taxpayer funded system only works in an imaginary Utopia, where everyone is an altruist, and everyone agrees as to how to proceed, and they're always right. In the real world, in Canada, it doesn't work. People with money will always have the option of going to the US for the best care (Danny Wiiliams), or even going somewhere like India where many surgeries and procedures can be done much faster and just as well or better for a fraction of the cost to our system.

                              The only real argument for a single system 100% funded by the taxpayer is coming from Unions or Union sympathisers. They are who it works for, not for citizens. The only thing it works for is to provide the ultimate leverage for wage and benefit demands and the like.

                              I prefer the Canadian system, but it's still not working well enough, and money isn't the problem. Or rather, it is, because we'd need all of the money in the world and then some more. And US health care is not at all the nightmare some people here in Canada (and in the US) are trying to make it out to be. We could all stand to put aside the rhetoric and learn something from each other, but we all know that 90% of the discussion revolves around highly partisan ideologically driven rhetoric and bs.

                              It would be nice if we could have a real discussion regarding what we expect from our health care system. I'm absolutely committed to the notion of universal access, but we need to have reasonable expectations.
                              Last edited by Jimbo; 11-02-2010, 05:10 PM.
                              aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

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