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  • #16
    Originally posted by Top_Dawg View Post
    Well Top_Dawg doesn't agree with that.

    Learning to read and write ( or language arts as was the cornholio term back in the day - obviously dreamed up by some career pedagogue ) is most certainly about spelling, grammar, and usage.

    However, just as importantly, it's equally as much about acquiring soft skills.

    Like critical thinking, clear communication, understanding the tone of a message being relayed and received.

    Now Top_Dawg knows this all sounds like mamby pamby pap.

    But try living your life without these skills.

    And no personal communication device will teach you that.
    I don't agree either but writing and speech evolves just like everything else. We don't talk like they did when Shakespeare was alive and I should imagine a few hundred years from now there will be words we use now that will no longer be used or the don't mean the same thing.
    If people evolve and the world speaks just one language, and that may well be English, I should imagine words that start or end with ph or gh will fall by the wayside, they may get rid of the C or the K as they sound the same. What letter could we get rid of in the word 'knife'. There's lots of examples where the written English language could evolve.
    As for comprehension, well 5 people could read the same paragraph and conceivably read something different. It happens all the time on this forum.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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    • #17
      ^ One day "kudetah" will be considered acceptable spelling.

      You heard it here first.

      Comment


      • #18


        Classic.

        Trailer trash ebonics.

        Comment


        • #19
          So, like 'physicality' being accepted as a word?

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          • #20
            The word "physicality" entered the English language as a medical term in 1592 according to the Oxford Dictionary.

            However, the current usage by some media personalities in sports is just bizarre.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by highlander View Post
              ^ One day "kudetah" will be considered acceptable spelling.

              You heard it here first.
              Well actually you are spelling it wrong. It's 'kudatah'.
              Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

              Comment


              • #22
                ^ Well, highlander's spelling is closer to that of the 'original' bastardisation. I will never use that spelling.
                Nisi Dominus Frustra

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Top_Dawg View Post
                  Well Top_Dawg doesn't agree with that.

                  Learning to read and write ( or language arts as was the cornholio term back in the day - obviously dreamed up by some career pedagogue ) is most certainly about spelling, grammar, and usage.

                  However, just as importantly, it's equally as much about acquiring soft skills.

                  Like critical thinking, clear communication, understanding the tone of a message being relayed and received.

                  Now Top_Dawg knows this all sounds like mamby pamby pap.

                  But try living your life without these skills.

                  And no personal communication device will teach you that.
                  I wish kids would be taught to recognize the subtle manipulative techniques that can be utilized by skilled speakers, news writers, politicians, salespeople, marketers, etc. Things as simple as saying "we" rather than "I", or gross generalizations, repetition, allusion, etc.



                  Then there's this:

                  Why Hitler was such a successful orator - Business Insider
                  http://www.businessinsider.com/why-h...-orator-2015-5

                  Last edited by KC; 17-03-2016, 03:53 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by howie View Post
                    ^ Well, highlander's spelling is closer to that of the 'original' bastardisation. I will never use that spelling.
                    Reminds me of the guy who got a tattoo saying "No Regrets" but the tattoo artist (I use that term loosely) transposed one word and wrote "No Regerts". I'm thinking there may have been a kudatah in the tattoo parlour that day.
                    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by KC View Post
                      Originally posted by Top_Dawg View Post
                      Well Top_Dawg doesn't agree with that.

                      Learning to read and write ( or language arts as was the cornholio term back in the day - obviously dreamed up by some career pedagogue ) is most certainly about spelling, grammar, and usage.

                      However, just as importantly, it's equally as much about acquiring soft skills.

                      Like critical thinking, clear communication, understanding the tone of a message being relayed and received.

                      Now Top_Dawg knows this all sounds like mamby pamby pap.

                      But try living your life without these skills.

                      And no personal communication device will teach you that.
                      I wish kids would be taught to recognize the subtle manipulative techniques that can be utilized by skilled speakers, news writers, politicians, salespeople, marketers, etc. Things as simple as saying "we" rather than "I", or gross generalizations, repetition, allusion, etc.



                      Then there's this:

                      Why Hitler was such a successful orator - Business Insider
                      http://www.businessinsider.com/why-h...-orator-2015-5

                      I have to agree, language is an art form. I'm sure we all have favorite writers simply because we like what they write and the style in which they write it. Or writers who can successfully turn a book into a movie or a stage production. I've read plenty of novels (some of them best sellers) and if the style of writing does not grab me in the first 15-20 pages I'll give up on it. It does not matter what genre a person writes about they have to make it interesting.
                      Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        We need teaching of both comprehension and recognition:


                        Fallacies

                        http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies/

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I think there needs to be 2 different kinds of English classes at the high school level - one for arts (focuses on poetry, literature, creative writing, etc.) and another on technical aspects (focuses on grammar, persuasive writing, business communication, technical writing, etc.)

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Perhaps a class on using 'then' and 'than'.

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