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Secret downtown beach can be a game-changer for Edmonton

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  • Secret downtown beach can be a game-changer for Edmonton

    Secret downtown beach can be a game-changer for Edmonton
    http://edmontonjournal.com/news/loca...r-for-edmonton

    Edmonton has a secret downtown beach that is so spacious and lovely it should become a major attraction and a game-changer for the city.

    For little cost, there could be a permanent downtown beach with a spectacular postcard view of the downtown, close to the new Valley Line LRT station on one side and to Louise McKinney Riverfront Park and the new funicular on the other.
    The beach appeared as if out of nowhere. It came as an unintended consequence of the new Tawatina LRT bridge construction over the river.

    Massive rock berms had been constructed on either side of the river to allow for the construction of the bridge’s two piers. As water resources engineer Darren Shepherd of SG1 Water Consulting Ltd. explains it, earlier this summer flow in the river was relatively high so lots of silt and sand was being transported downstream. The construction berm on the south side of the river resulted in slower-moving water and allowed the sediment carried by the water to deposit on the river bed. A large volume of sand and silt settled over roughly one-kilometre-long strip, about 25 metres wide, on the south side of the bank.
    Once the rock-fill berms are removed following completion of bridge construction, the beach will likely become less prominent or usable, said Shepherd, whose company has been involved with designing and building a whitewater boating facility on the Bow River in Calgary.

    But there are ways to try to keep the beach, Shepherd said. The cost of hauling the rocks off the construction site could instead be put toward moving them slightly downstream from the new bridge and strategically placing them so that a beach area is maintained. This could be done without impacting the new bridge structure.

    The new rock feature need not jut out so far into the river channel as the construction berm, Shepherd said, but enough to slow the water so that a somewhat smaller beach remains. “You can train the river to maintain that beach … It’s definitely feasible.”
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  • #2
    ^
    Cool, we should definitely make this permanent, if possible! It would be just down the river from the Edmonton Queen (if the poor fellow who bought it can ever get his permits through), and the new funicular means this could be readily accessible from downtown.

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    • #3
      YEESSSSSSS!!!! I took my dog for a swim across the river and over the bridge from Hawrelak park when it was 30+ degrees a few weeks ago and was shocked at how crystal clear the water was. The silt was so fine that when you dried off you had this fine dust on the skin and the dogs hair became super soft, but needed a quick bath once we got home. I am 100% in favour of the city pursuing something like this. On a hot day, nothing beats real water/beach activities. This would be an amazing addition to central Edmonton. The only thing I would hope to see is some decent infrastructure to make it usable, like a bathroom and change areas with a few showers to rinse the silt off when finished. Otherwise I would love to see this happen as soon as construction of the LRT bridge is finished.
      Last edited by etownboarder; 18-08-2017, 09:57 AM.

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      • #4
        Heard this beach was a popular destination during Folk Fest

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        • #5
          I'll never understand the obsession some people have with getting a beach in the river valley. I just don't see how it fits the general environment of the valley, and indeed Edmonton generally. It's like putting a ski hill in Tijuana.

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          • #6
            ^
            Several lakes within driving distance of Edmonton have beaches. Not all of us have cars, and would appreciate a beach accessible in the city, particularly by transit. If Paris can have beaches along the river, why can't we?

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            • #7
              ^^
              It gives many people (locals and visitors alike) a good reason to visit the river valley, especially families. Not everyone is a jogger, hiker or cyclist. And this is a far better idea than the ridiculous "sand park" that they were planning for LMP.
              “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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              • #8
                There are 3 really nice areas/beaches/sediment deposits to be on the river during the summer.

                This one, across from hawrelak and big island.


                Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                • #9
                  ^ There's a few more beaches actually. One right near the Fort Edmonton footbridge (just a bit south - but its really large, and gets larger every year... Tons of people are now using it to do beach stuff on, or fish from.)

                  Another one that's kinda seasonal is the east of the Terwillegar footbridge, but this one is starting to grow in size too...

                  The first one near the ft edm footbridge is really something, at least for a river beach.
                  A people that elect corrupt politicians, imposters, thieves and traitors are not victims, but accomplices.

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                  • #10
                    I'll second that Meds - and it's getting ever more popular.
                    ... gobsmacked

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                    • #11
                      Mind you, these probably come and go with the river levels. The article has a solution for the one near the new LRT bridge.
                      “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by overoceans View Post
                        I'll never understand the obsession some people have with getting a beach in the river valley. I just don't see how it fits the general environment of the valley, and indeed Edmonton generally. It's like putting a ski hill in Tijuana.
                        You realize that 100 years ago people were swimming in the river all summer long.

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                        • #13
                          Global story is a bit better
                          http://globalnews.ca/news/3681242/ne...-edmontonians/
                          “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by overoceans View Post
                            I'll never understand the obsession some people have with getting a beach in the river valley. I just don't see how it fits the general environment of the valley, and indeed Edmonton generally. It's like putting a ski hill in Tijuana.
                            I don't really either. But its not just here. For some reason there is a present day amplified fascination with beaches of any sort. On a Recent Trip to Jasper I was amazed to see so many cars pulled over by people taking a dip in Lake Abraham. we're talking literally 100's of cars stopping on the highway where previously hardly anybody had ever stopped except to gawk at Rocky Mountain Sheep or goats.

                            But at least that is a pristine NP environment the people are bathing in. What really is the attraction of beaching, even bathing (shudder) in a river with multiple discharges to it and that people wouldn't eat fish from?

                            That aside beaches do fit river environments, and are often natural occurrences, just that I don't follow the fascination for them. Plus that we already have plenty of them. The Whitemud creek entering the North Sask being among the largest. The article speaks as if river front beaches are not commonplace here, which they are. There is nothing at all unique about the beach sited in the article.
                            "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Replacement
                              But at least that is a pristine NP environment the people are bathing in.


                              None of Lake Abraham resides in a national park. The closest part of Lake Abraham is 25 KM from the park gates.

                              Originally posted by Replacement
                              What really is the attraction of beaching, even bathing (shudder) in a river with multiple discharges to it and that people wouldn't eat fish from?


                              Fish are safe to eat from the NS, as far as I know. There's recommendations to only eat it once a week and avoid whole fish, but otherwise it's safe. And it's perfectly safe to swim in the river. Especially at this time of year now that the snow melt has finished and the flow has slowed, the water is very clear. Every natural body of water, whether it be a lake, river, or ocean, has human and animal discharges/waste flowing in to it. The entire Caribbean is basically one giant toilet because of how much sewage is dumped in to it and it's reasonably isolated from the Atlantic. Yet hundreds of millions of people swim in it all the time. All of Alberta's recreational lakes are surrounded by development and numerous septic fields, a fair portion of which are probably malfunctioning at any one time. Yet again, millions of people go swimming in them on a regular basis.

                              As far as why there is such a human propensity to enjoy beaches and being near water, scientists have been studying that phenomenon for a long time. Ultimately the hypothesis is that humans are naturally drawn to such environments because as **** sapiens evolved and spread around the world, maritime environments were often the most productive and fertile, and also yielded easy long distance travel walking along shores or travelling across water. Kind of a chicken and egg thing. If **** sapiens weren't drawn to productive maritime environments, the species may not have been as successful or able to spread as quickly as it did. I don't think there's any way to actually "prove" the hypothesis, but it makes sense to me anyways.

                              edit: seriously, I can't even write h o m o sapiens? This word filter is incredibly idiotic.

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