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Naturalizing non-native plants

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  • #16
    Interesting interview:


    Trees survive the cold weather

    The study of two distantly related species of tree may help scientists understand how Pine and Spruce in western Canada deal with cold temperatures on a warming planet. Understanding how the Lodgepole pine and a variety of Spruce known as Interior spruce cope with unpredictable cold temperatures, including cold snaps, will help foresters plan the timing and location of planting these trees as the climate changes. A new study by Dr. Sally Aitken, a professor in the Department of Forest and Conservation Science at UBC in Vancouver, has looked at the genetics of both species for answers. Surprisingly, even though the trees last had a common ancestor 140 million years ago, Lodgepole pine and Interior spruce use the same genetic solution - known as convergent evolution - for surviving the cold

    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/quirks/quirk...ther-1.3784317

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    • #17
      I've noticed that the city has planted large numbers of mountain ash, burr oak, etc. in the river valley. Non native trees but nice to have. The mountain ash stay green longer which is nice. Caragana too.

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      • #18
        Interesting:

        Jumping Worms: The Creepy, Damaging Invasive You Don’t Know – Cool Green Science

        https://www.google.ca/amp/s/blog.nat...dont-know/amp/

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        • #19
          Also interesting:

          Opinion: It's Time to Stop Thinking That All Non-Native Species Are Evil

          https://www.google.ca/amp/relay.nati...limate-science

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          • #20
            Are American Elm an invasive species?

            So here in Edmonton we have American Elm that are spreading huge amounts of seed. (I have elms all around our house.) I would guess that some seeds are getting into the river etc. Should these Elms be removed?

            Also, down in Laurier Park right next to the river there are caragana. Would they also be considered invasive?



            Spotted this headline:


            May 11, 2016 7:57 pm EST
            Caragana shrub invades Calgary’s natural areas as city starts removal program
            Last edited by KC; 29-05-2018, 10:00 AM.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by KC View Post
              Are American Elm an invasive species?

              So here in Edmonton we have American Elm that are spreading huge amounts of seed. (I have elms all around our house.) I would guess that some seeds are getting into the river etc. Should these Elms be removed?

              Also, down in Laurier Park right next to the river there are caragana. Would they also be considered invasive?



              Spotted this headline:


              May 11, 2016 7:57 pm EST
              Caragana shrub invades Calgary’s natural areas as city starts removal program
              interesting that elm - and caragana - can be considered invasive species worthy of action but that non-native dandelions aren't...
              "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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              • #22
                Those heavy seeders are Manitoba Maples aren't they?
                I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

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                • #23
                  The amount of elm seeds this year even made the news.

                  The natural range for Elms stretches into south eastern Alberta but not to Edmonton. Anyone know if they are spreading along the N. Sask river at all?

                  At our cabin we planted a Russian Olive. I now see that they are bad for riparian areas and displaced native willow, so I guess we’ll be taking the chain saw to it.


                  https://abinvasives.ca/invasive-spec...ulated-plants/


                  https://abinvasives.ca/wp-content/up...ssianOlive.pdf
                  “Prevention:
                  Mature populations of Russian olive are diffi- cult to control and nearly impossible to eradi- cate.1 Early detection and rapid response are the most effective tools, after prevention. Learn to recognize Russian olive, don’t grow it, and remove any existing plantings, partic- ularly in riparian areas. Fruits are dispersed by animals and streams.”
                  Last edited by KC; 29-05-2018, 01:52 PM.

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                  • #24
                    ‘It is choking the lake’: Invasive weed taking over rural Alberta lake at risk of spreading | Edmonton Journal
                    https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...k-of-spreading

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                    • #25
                      Spread of invasive species in Canada costs billions, changes environment | CTV News

                      https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/spread...ment-1.4230065

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                      • #26
                        BBC - Future - How weeds help fight climate change

                        “The United Nations’ Sustainable Development Solutions Network announced in 2016 that the Mulloon Creek Natural Farms are one of the few farming sites in the world that are truly sustainable, and commended the model of natural sequence farming.”

                        http://www.bbc.com/future/story/2019...climate-change

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                        • #27
                          Very cool article. I wonder if that would work in drought areas in southern Alberta
                          My antidepressent drug of choice is running. Cheaper with less side effects!

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                          • #28
                            Some interesting plants:
                            Perennial Vegetables for Zone 3 - Northern Homestead

                            https://northernhomestead.com/variet...zone-3-garden/




                            Woman launches 'Harvest of the Beast' contest to fight Alberta's 'evil' weed


                            https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...ower-1.5226542





                            The endless war against invasive species – Red Deer Advocate

                            One invasive species the council is working hard to keep outside Albertan boundaries is aquatic invasive mussels.

                            “If they arrived in Alberta, it would be absolutely devastating. These things thrive in irrigation canals and it would be billions of dollars to fix,” Ryerson said.


                            https://www.reddeeradvocate.com/news...asive-species/
                            Last edited by KC; 08-11-2019, 09:21 PM.

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                            • #29
                              there are a couple of really bad posts in this thread that show a hilarious lack of scientific understanding

                              there are a nice variety of plants in europe if you don't like the plants here, maybe you should be going away rather than bringing things here
                              Last edited by bicycles; 09-11-2019, 06:13 PM.
                              you missed when time and life shook hands and said goodbye.

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                              • #30
                                ash and elm entry in the city should definitely be stopped, dutch elm disease and emerald ash borer will get in eventually anyways

                                bur oak I have a bit more sympathy for because it can be a food crop and I think works as a boulevard tree/in people's yards. as far as I know you can't naturalize bur oak savanna, especially in apsen parkland as the suckers overwhelm them (another reason why bison will be needed to restore grasslands and not cattle). They are found in MB and SK naturally and even into NW Ontario where some were probably planted by Anishinaabe as a food crop there.
                                you missed when time and life shook hands and said goodbye.

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