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  • Lost buildings

    Thought i would start a thread to show how much we have taken away from Edmonton and perhaps have people stand up for historical structures a little more. Imagine some of these there today and how interesting it they would be.

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    The old Woodward`s department store stands proudly fitted with flags and bunting, ready to celebrate the royal visit. While Sam Cherniak sells popcorn to passersby on the 102 Avenue corner, the new Eaton`s department store is in the midst of construction on the other side of 101 Street. The building shown here includes the original Woodward`s store, which opened on this site on October 15, 1926, and the three additional bays built onto the north, nearest the Royal George Hotel, in 1929 and 1932. By September, 1940, fourth and fifth storeys were added as well. In June, 1974, the building was demolished to be replaced by the new Edmonton Centre complex.

    Edmonton: Portrait of a City (page 175)

    Photo Date: circa 1929
    Photographer:
    Address:
    Built: (Opened: 1926)
    Demolished: 1974



    The King Edward Hotel was built in 1904 with additions in 1908 and 1940s. The architect was M.A. Magoon. It acquired an addition in 1910 that allowed it to surpass the Alberta Hotel as Edmonton's leading hotel. It was located on 1st Street (now 101st Street) and 102nd Avenue and burned to the ground in 1982 to be replaced by the ManuLife Building.


    Photo Date: unknown
    Photographer:
    Address: 101st Street and 102nd Avenue.
    Built: (Built: 1904)
    Demolished: 1982



    The Empire Block was constructed in 1905 by McDougall and Secord, Ltd. as an office and retail building. Liggett`s Owl Drugs Company Ltd. occupied most of the main floor while the upper three floors were reserved for offices. In 1942, a fire severely damaged the building, but it reopened three months later. In 1962, the old Empire Building was torn down by the McDougall-Secord Company to make room for the new 11-storey Empire Building completed in 1963. The McDougall-Secord Company continues to maintain offices at this site.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: 1905
    Photographer:
    Address: 10113 101 Street
    Built: (Built: 1905)
    Demolished: 1962



    This Neo-Classical style "temple" was built in 1907 on the site of Edmonton`s first bank, situated here since 1892. Built at a cost of $90,000, the new sandstone structure displayed an elegant marble interior and porcelain tile floor. An interesting feature was its special room for women customers who wished to deposit their real estate gains without the knowledge of their husbands. The second floor housed the offices of a law firm, and the third floor was reserved for bank clerk living quarters. In 1950, the building was demolished to make room for the present six storey Imperial Bank, constructed in 1952.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: 1908
    Photographer:
    Address: 9990 Jasper Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1907)
    Demolished: 1950



    Constructed from 1907 to 1910 by the Federal government, this building was Edmonton`s main northside Post Office for 56 years. It was a distinctive Edmonton landmark with its copper mansard roof, cupola windows, domed clock tower, and Manitoba Tyndall stone exterior. In 1967, the city purchased the building and in 1972 sold it to Leamar Developments for the construction of the Edmonton Plaza Hotel, presently the Westin Hotel. Leamar demolished the Post Office that year, and the famous clock and tower were dismantled and stored for future reconstruction on the original site. But the clock tower stonework was reused in a memorial gardens monument, so a modern clock tower was specifically designed for the original clock and mechanism. The new clock tower was installed in 1978 on the north end of the Westin Hotel site through the generosity of an anonymous donor.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: circa 1915
    Photographer:
    Address: 100 Street, 101A Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1907-1910)
    Demolished: 1972



    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  • #2
    Constructed in 1911, this building housed the Supreme and District Courts until 1972, when it was sold to Woodwards and demolished for the construction of Edmonton Centre. This Greek templelike building had a sandstone exterior and granite foundation. The interior showed a classical elegance with Greek columns, a marble staircase, and skylight. The four court rooms in the upper gallery were oak panelled.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: circa 1915
    Photographer:
    Address: 100 Street, 102A Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1911)
    Demolished: 1972



    The Tegler Building was built in 1911 by Edmonton entrepreneur and philanthropist, Robert Tegler. Designed by H. A. Magoon, the Tegler Building was known to be one of the earliest reinforced concrete buildings in Alberta, and the first fireproof office building in Edmonton. The stone used for its construction was quarried from a rock coulee near Fort MacLeod. An eight-storey addition was constructed in 1913 to accommodate the expansion of James Ramsey`s department store, which remained here until 1929. The Tegler Building is clad in red brick and white stone, with the entablature and other detailing of pressed tin. Primarily Classical in its detailing, it is representative of the transition to the Sullivanesque modern era and achieves a balance in horizontals and verticals. Some of the Classical detailing includes corner quoins, pilasters, and a two-storey balcony with engaged Ionic columns and a balustrade which accents the upper floors.

    Edmonton`s Threatened Heritage

    Photo Date: circa 1912
    Photographer: Byron May Co.
    Address: 101 Street and 102 Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1911)
    Demolished: 1982



    Built in 1913 by Alexander Pantages and George Brown, the Pantages Vaudeville Theatre hosted such great entertainers as the Marx Brothers, Buster Keaton, Laurel and Hardy, and others. In 1931, the theatre was renamed The Strand. Premier William Aberhart broadcast his Sunday sermons from its stage in the 1930`s. The theatre was known for its remarkable Italian Renaissance interior. Alexander Pantages used Italian and Greek marble throughout, trimmed with bronze and bevelled glass. The walls were panelled with damask figured silk and the decoration was punctuated with detailed use of gilt and plaster works. Although the building was designated a Provincial Historic Site in 1976, it was dismantled in 1979 by the First Northern Building Corporation, who had purchased the site twenty years earlier. During demolition, plaster figurines were removed and molds of the interior were made with the intention of reconstructing the theatre in Fort Edmonton Park. Batoni-Bowlen Enterprises Ltd. purchased the site for the InterProvincial Pipeline Building which was completed in 1981.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: July 24, 1919
    Photographer: McDermid Studios
    Address: 10209 Jasper Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1913)
    Demolished: 1979



    In 1917, Famous Players built the Capitol Theatre, the first silent movie house in Edmonton. When the silent film era closed in 1929, sound equipment was installed. The entire theatre was remodelled in 1938, including installation of the theatre`s famous 2,000 light marquee, the largest in Western Canada. Smoke Shops Ltd. and Kline`s Jewellery Store shared the ground floor with the theatre from 1917 until its demolition. In 1972, Famous Players demolished the Capitol along with the Agency and the Monarch Buildings to make way for the 22-storey Capitol Square Theatre and office complex, completed in 1975.

    Edmonton`s Lost Heritage

    Photo Date: December, n.d.
    Photographer: H. Jack Conway
    Address: 10067 Jasper Avenue
    Built: (Built: 1917)
    Demolished: 1972



    Jasper Avenue and 101 Street



    Jointly funded by the Andrew Carnegie Corporation of New York and the City of Edmonton, this grand French Renaissance structure with Italian detailing was for more than 40 years the main branch of the Edmonton Public Library. It overlooked the North Saskatchewan River valley from a perch just north of Macdonald Drive and west of 99th Street.

    The Board commissioned local architects Herbert Alton Magoon and George Heath MacDonald to prepare plans for a reinforced concrete and steel fireproof building "costing not more than $150,000." Constructed of cream coloured terr-cotta clay brick and Bedford stone, the central entrances were flanked by four fluted Doric columns, topped with copper trim and red tile roofing. Interior finishes included Caen stone, terrazzo tile and marble.

    The central portion of the main floor was crowned by a massive skylight measuring 65 feet by 24 feet, carried on Ionic columns. Large windows on all sides made for superb natural light penetration. The building even boasted a central vacuum system.

    Poole Construction got the contract to erect the structure -- the first project for a new Edmonton company started by Ernest Poole, and which today has evolved to become the massive firm PCL. Work commenced in late 1922 and was completed the following summer.

    The new building was officially opened on August 30th, 1923, amid much pomp and circumstance. Premier Herbert Greenfield and former Premier Alexander Rutherford both spoke at the ceremony.

    A little more than 40 years later, Edmonton's grand house of books was deemed too small and construction began on a new library which opened September 30, 1967 and was called the Centennial. Poole Construction, the company that built the 1923 library, was selected to demolish it and that happened in 1969. Poole Construction then built the AGT Tower (now the Telus Tower) on the same site, beginning in 1970.

    (Text credit: Lawrence Herzog – Edmonton Real Estate Weekly – Sept 27, 2007)

    The Source

    Photo Date:
    Photographer:
    Address: MacDonald Drive
    Built: (Opened: 1923)
    Demolished: 1968




    Pictures of our Past > Photo Collection: Buildings > Buildings (1911 to 1970) > Details
    Details
    1929 Eaton`s Mail Order Warehouse


    Edmonton Archives EA-624-10
    The T. Eaton Co. Limited Mail Order Building was the first building constructed specifically for the T. Eaton Company in Edmonton, and pre-dates the 101 Street department store by ten years. The building was completed in November, 1929 and was designed by Magoon and MacDonald of Edmonton. Eaton`s acquired the land in what contemporary sources termed as "the largest land deal in Edmonton`s history". This building originally stocked only heavy goods and machinery. The Mail Order Building is a rectangular, two-storey structure of steel and reinforced concrete sheathed in buff-coloured brick and ivory buff Tyndall limestone. The flat roof is bordered by a parapet and stone cornice decorated with dentils. All ground floor window openings are flat-headed, while the upper storey exhibits a rhythmic fenestration of triple round-arched windows.

    Edmonton`s Threatened Heritage

    Photo Date: circa 1980
    Photographer: Clyde Cornfield
    Address:
    Built: (Built: 1929)
    Demolished:



    From 1928 until 1977 the eight-ton, 10-metre-tall bottle sat on the roof of Edmonton City Dairy on 109 Street, north of Jasper Avenue. The milk bottle was so big and so white that bush pilots would actually use it to steer by as their planes approached the Municipal Airport.


    Photo Date: unknown
    Photographer:
    Address: 109 Street, north of Jasper Avenue.
    Built: (Built: 192
    Demolished: 1977


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

    Comment


    • #3
      source:

      http://www.epl.ca/EPLPhotoBuildings.cfm


      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by IanO
        1929 Eaton`s Mail Order Warehouse


        Edmonton Archives EA-624-10
        The T. Eaton Co. Limited Mail Order Building was the first building constructed specifically for the T. Eaton Company in Edmonton, and pre-dates the 101 Street department store by ten years. The building was completed in November, 1929 and was designed by Magoon and MacDonald of Edmonton. Eaton`s acquired the land in what contemporary sources termed as "the largest land deal in Edmonton`s history". This building originally stocked only heavy goods and machinery. The Mail Order Building is a rectangular, two-storey structure of steel and reinforced concrete sheathed in buff-coloured brick and ivory buff Tyndall limestone. The flat roof is bordered by a parapet and stone cornice decorated with dentils. All ground floor window openings are flat-headed, while the upper storey exhibits a rhythmic fenestration of triple round-arched windows.

        Edmonton`s Threatened Heritage

        Photo Date: circa 1980
        Photographer: Clyde Cornfield
        Address:
        Built: (Built: 1929)
        Demolished:
        I believe this was located at 103 Ave and 103 Street and was demolished to make room for the bus depot.

        Comment


        • #5
          ^i think this is 102st/103ave


          Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by IanO
            ^i think this is 102st/103ave
            After examining the background, I believe you are correct.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by IanO
              Jointly funded by the Andrew Carnegie Corporation of New York and the City of Edmonton, this grand French Renaissance structure with Italian detailing was for more than 40 years the main branch of the Edmonton Public Library. It overlooked the North Saskatchewan River valley from a perch just north of Macdonald Drive and west of 99th Street.

              (Text credit: Lawrence Herzog – Edmonton Real Estate Weekly – Sept 27, 2007)

              The Source

              Photo Date:
              Photographer:
              Address: MacDonald Drive
              Built: (Opened: 1923)


              This is one of the most tragic of all... can you imagine this as our main library branch instead of the Stanley Milner? I wish I could've been around to see it in those days, it would've been a magnificent library.

              Comment


              • #8
                I had no idea so many awesome buildings were torn down. Edmonton would be a lot cooler if we had kept these... wow...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Does anyone have a picture of that old movie theatre on Jasper Ave next to the Hardware Grill? I would love to see what that looked like in it's prime.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had no idea so many awesome buildings were torn down. How many of these beauties were leveled to make gravel parking lots? It's truly appalling. wow...
                    It is appalling. What else will be torn down in the name of progress?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      How absolutely depressing to see what we had and destroyed.. If we only knew then what we know now!!
                      Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 24karat
                        How absolutely depressing to see what we had and destroyed.. If we only knew then what we know now!!
                        And what do we know now? We're still tearing down buildings that should have heritage designation.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          That's sad that these areas weren't made into an "Old Edmonton" and the newer buildings had been built over some shabbier locations.

                          Apart from the Leg, I can't offhand think of any other building where you climb some massive stairs, past huge columns and into a grand entry.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TerryH
                            Apart from the Leg, I can't offhand think of any other building where you climb some massive stairs, past huge columns and into a grand entry.
                            University, General hospital, MacDonald Hotel, Police station, court house, Milner library... Granted with today's requirements for disabled access the stairs aren't as grand, but there are still many around town.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Was the Carnegie Library funding still available in the 1960s or 1970s? Even if the old library was deemed too small, a bigger version of that would have been better than what we have now.

                              The biggest loss was that old court house. Now that looked like a really nice building.
                              “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

                              Comment

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