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  • Bison

    Buffalo National Park here in Alberta is another bit of Alberta history that was never mentioned in my school years.

    ...nor were Alberta’s Nemiskam or Wawaskesy National Parks


    What America Lost When It Lost the Bison - The Atlantic

    ED YONG
    NOVEMBER 18, 2019


    “ This phenomenon, known as surfing the green wave, allows animals to eat plants at their most nutritious, when they’re full of nitrogen and proteins and low in indigestible matter. Such freshness is fleeting, and so grazers undertake large migrations to track the new greenery as it crests across the landscape. Over the past decade, scientists have shown that...”

    “ “It threw us for a complete loop,” Geremia says. “How can they fall behind but still have an incredibly high-quality diet?”...


    “ “The near extinction of the buffalo left a major gap,” said Leroy Little Bear, a Blood Tribe member and a retired professor at the University of Lethbridge, in a statement. “The treaty on buffalo restoration aims to begin to fill that gap and once again partner with the buffalo to bring about cultural and ecological balance.”


    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/...spring/602176/

    History of bison conservation in Canada - Wikipedia

    “... many were moved to Wood Buffalo National Park in north-eastern Alberta (est. 1922). There, the plains bison and wood bison mingled and created a hybridized species of bison.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histor...tion_in_Canada

    Don’t Fence Me In-Wild bison are coming back to Alberta. Are we ready?

    BY KEVIN VAN TIGHEM JULY 1, 2018

    Try and picture them all. On his first visit to the Waterton area in 1865, John (“Kootenai”) Brown wrote: “The prairie as far as we could see east, north and west was one living mass of buffalo. Thousands of head there were, far thicker than ever range cattle grazed the bunch grass of the foothills… None of our party up to this time had ever seen a buffalo.”

    ...

    Annual Métis bison hunts, in Brown’s day, sometimes filled more than a thousand Red River carts with bison meat. Those hunts had ended by 1880 for lack of bison. The US Army had...”

    John A. Macdonald, thought it a very good thing. “I am not at all sorry,” he said to Canada’s House of Commons in faraway Ottawa. “So long as there was a hope that bison would come into the country, there was no means of inducing the Indians to settle down on their reserves.”

    https://albertaviews.ca/dont-fence-me-in/
    ‘Virtually unprecedented’: Banff bison roaming free for first time in 140 years – Calgary Herald
    August 2, 2018
    https://calgaryherald.com/news/local...e-in-140-years


    Delisted: Alberta Parks Lost and Forgotten By Kirsten Olson Office and Fund Program Administrator
    https://cpaws-southernalberta.org/de...and-forgotten/


    Bison - Alberta Wilderness Association
    https://albertawilderness.ca/issues/wildlife/bison/


    Bolding mine
    Last edited by KC; 19-11-2019, 01:27 AM.

  • #2
    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saska...rson-1.5342490

    It's slightly exasperating that Elk Island National Park is pretty much the premier bison preserve globally, but it's a complete unknown. Compare to Banff which has signs in Japanese because tourists go there by the truckload.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, I suppose soon Elk Island National Park will be nothing special in terms of bison. You’d think that in the past the world‘s tourists would have flocked here in the millions to see them. (Another lost opportunity?)

      More Alberta bison to roam Russia
      Roughly 120 now live in Lensky Stolby Nature Park
      The Canadian Press, March 30, 2013

      https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calga...ssia-1.1391014
      Last edited by KC; 22-11-2019, 05:49 AM.

      Comment


      • #4
        It's better for everyone--and it's especially better for the bison--that Elk Island remain obscure. National parks are meant to be protected natural areas that are appreciated only in ways that protect their integrity. They're not zoos and if they're treated at such their value is diminished. All it takes is a few hours in Banff during a summer weekend to realize how damaging unfettered tourism is.

        Comment


        • #5
          ^Concur with this. Elk Island is a treasure. That its a far less visited treasure makes it even greater. But this is not unique to Canada's National Parks. In Alberta we tend to think of these as Rocky Mountain Parks that are heavily visited but the majority of NP's nationwide get low visitor numbers. The Canadian Rockies NP's skew the perception of how utilized NP's are.

          Elk Island does OK in terms of visitor numbers relative to other NP/Reserves

          Then theres the whole other issues of massive amounts of people now not too familiar with the outdoors, with outdoor enjoyment, with camping etc. Which has required radical efforts on the part of most NP's to get visitors.

          The NP and Historic sites had some real scares a decade ago as visitation in all but the Mountain Parks was dropping off the map.

          https://uwaterloo.ca/canadian-index-...s-and-national

          This has since been reversed but again with major efforts to try to get people out. Many new initiatives to try to get people experience and utilize the parks and historic sites. Even giving free annual passes out for a couple years as part of Canada's 150 celebration.
          Last edited by Replacement; 22-11-2019, 08:08 AM.
          "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

          Comment


          • #6


            Elk Island is pretty well-visited, given its relative size & prominence.

            https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/docs/pc/attend
            Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

            Comment


            • #7
              The world's largest free-roaming herd of wood bison is located in Alberta in Wood Buffalo National Park. Unfortunately this herd has been rendered prone to bovine tuberculosis and brucellosis through the introduction of plains bison into the herd during the 1920s. This move also introduced cattle genes into the herd (source).

              There is a small disease-free, pure-strain herd of wood bison in Elk Island on the south side of Highway 16. Being among the last such healthy herds of wood bison in the world, they are an important resource for recovery initiatives of the species. However, wood bison are not native to Elk Island; thus the presence of this herd does not further the ecological integrity objective for Elk Island (source).

              There is another pure-strain and disease-free herd of wood bison in Alberta known as the Ronald Lake herd near Wood Buffalo. Unfortunately this herd is now under threat by the proposed Frontier Oil Sands Mine (source).

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by OffWhyte View Post

                There is another pure-strain and disease-free herd of wood bison in Alberta known as the Ronald Lake herd near Wood Buffalo. Unfortunately this herd is now under threat by the proposed Frontier Oil Sands Mine (source).
                Be carful or Kenney will sic his oil sands propaganda panel on you for saying that.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by kkozoriz View Post
                  Originally posted by OffWhyte View Post

                  There is another pure-strain and disease-free herd of wood bison in Alberta known as the Ronald Lake herd near Wood Buffalo. Unfortunately this herd is now under threat by the proposed Frontier Oil Sands Mine (source).
                  Be carful or Kenney will sic his oil sands propaganda panel on you for saying that.
                  He had better send his politburo types after the Alberta Energy regulator too then because this what the joint review panel of the AER had to say about the affect of the Frontier Mine:

                  We find that the project is likely to result in significant adverse environmental effects to wetlands, oldgrowth forests, wetland- and old-growth-reliant species at risk, the Ronald Lake bison herd, and biodiversity. The project is also likely to result in significant adverse effects to the asserted rights, use of lands and resources, and culture of indigenous groups who use the project area. The proposed mitigation measures have not been proven to be effective or to fully mitigate project effects on the environment or on indigenous rights, use of lands and resources, and culture.
                  Source: https://aer.ca/documents/decisions/2...19ABAER008.pdf

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Fake news! Sad!

                    Comment

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