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Edmonton's Population History

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  • Edmonton's Population History

    Just some numbers to look at. Anyone care to run some calculations? Fastest period of growth, greatest annual percentage growth, decline years... Anything else?

    Population History
    Edmonton's population has grown from 148 people in 1878 to 877,926 in 2014.


    http://www.edmonton.ca/city_governme...n-history.aspx

  • #2
    Interesting how during WWI, population dropped considerably. Any thoughts as to why? I can't imagine it was solidiers going to war, no similar downturn in population during WWII, so any other ideas? Just people moving away?

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    • #3
      ^There was a real estate boom which went bust around the beginning of WWI. This caused the population to drop from 72,516 in 1914 to 53,814 a year later.

      That's a nearly 26% drop in population in about a year. That'd be equivalent to today's population dropping from 877,926 (2014) to about 651,500 now.
      Is there hope for Edmonton? Yes!!! The Oilers? Wait and see.

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      • #4
        The only other decline in our history: 1994 - Ralph Klein.


        Fastest periods of absolute growth:

        - 1964 - annexation of Jasper Place and Beverly
        - 2013/14


        Fastest percentage growth (by far): 1910-1915


        Fastest percentage fall (by far): immediately after, as discussed.
        Let's make Edmonton better.

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        • #5
          Spanish flu also hit right after WWI, and Edmonton lost a lot of people.

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          • #6
            Holy wow. That's crazy. What was the cause of the bust? I suppose I could attempt sole research myself; but if you have a quick answer?

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            • #7
              For 1914-20, I'm also thinking two other things:

              (1) A drop in the birth rate because of the male population at war.

              (2) The 1919 Spanish Flu epidemic.
              "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

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              • #8
                ^^ I'm wondering if more resources were dedicated to the war effort. My guess would be that there might have been less immigration from overseas during the war.
                "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

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                • #9
                  I don't know how that bust happened. I've never researched it. Just knew it was there.
                  Let's make Edmonton better.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MikeK View Post
                    ^There was a real estate boom which went bust around the beginning of WWI. This caused the population to drop from 72,516 in 1914 to 53,814 a year later.

                    That's a nearly 26% drop in population in about a year. That'd be equivalent to today's population dropping from 877,926 (2014) to about 651,500 now.
                    The City of Strathcona amalgamated with Edmonton in 1912
                    Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by The_Cat View Post
                      For 1914-20, I'm also thinking two other things:

                      (1) A drop in the birth rate because of the male population at war.

                      (2) The 1919 Spanish Flu epidemic.
                      Workers moving to war industries back east.
                      Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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                      • #12
                        Based on the timing and what numbers I can find I think MikeK has it. On the graph the big drop looks to be around 1915 and amounts to thousands of people. The Spanish Flu hit Edmonton in late 1918 and the total death toll was around 600.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeli...monton_history
                        http://www.edmonton.ca/city_governme...n-history.aspx

                        "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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                        • #13
                          Given the 100th Anniversary of the Walterdale flood, I wonder if part of the decline was the result of people losing their property in Walterdale, Rossdale and other locations, and subsequently moving away.
                          "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

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                          • #14
                            Edmonton CMA Now 5th Largest

                            Based on the latest Statcan information, Edmonton has now surpassed Ottawa's CMA population for July 1, 2018 and is slightly lower than Calgary's:

                            Edmonton - 1,420,916
                            Ottawa - 1,414,399
                            Calgary - 1,486,050

                            Officially 5th largest in Canada!

                            https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/dail.../t001b-eng.htm

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                            • #15
                              And I thought that we were already the fifth largest city in Canada.

                              Found this link below. Check out 1961 and ‘71 for 3rd and 4th placement.


                              List of largest Canadian cities by census - Wikipedia

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...ties_by_census
                              Last edited by KC; 30-03-2019, 06:35 PM.

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