Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Delusion at the Gastropub

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Delusion at the Gastropub

    IT TAKES A LOT of high-capitalist pixie dust to turn the basics of subsistence into coveted luxuries. The brazen marketing of designer water at $5 per bottle, flown in from Fiji or the Alps—or better yet, filled from a local municipal tap—may have been the first red flag, signaling the modern public’s staggering ability to suspend its disbelief, or simply to miss the central tenets of manufactured demand.

    But if one trait characterizes Americans with lots of disposable income, it’s their tireless compulsion to dispose of that income in brand new ways. The more pedestrian the product in question, the greater its seeming potential to evoke untold volumes of feeling and meaning. A few centuries into the future, inhabitants of a ravaged globe may look back on this time as the crucial moment at which delusional fervor around unremarkable, overpriced things reached its apex.
    https://thebaffler.com/salvos/delusi...pub-havrilesky
    I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

  • #2

    Comment


    • #3
      The bourgeoisie will always find creative new ways to paint even their most decadent indulgences as highly enlightened, discriminating, and honorable—if not downright heroic.
      Gee, this seems like an apt description of someone here...
      Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by noodle View Post
        The bourgeoisie will always find creative new ways to paint even their most decadent indulgences as highly enlightened, discriminating, and honorable—if not downright heroic.
        Gee, this seems like an apt description of someone here...
        LOL !

        Seems like all you need to open a "hip" "cool" restaurant in Edmonton is a little hipster cred, but not much else.

        We went to the new burger place on 124st the other day, Woodshed, and we were sorely disappointed. The burger patty was not properly formed so it was more of a burger ball, and it was raw in the middle. The bun was very dense. The homemade ketchup was offputting, and the poutine we shared had little flavor with only a small amount of cheese curds. For $50 for two burgers, two pops and a shared poutine it was nowhere near worth it. This place advertises that it makes everything in -house from all free range organic GMO free blah blah ingredients, which is great, but not if you make it into a sub-par product. But it seems that for a lot of establishments here, that doesn't matter as long as you got your Insta followers, arm tats & greasy beard and a clever hook.
        Over promise and under deliver. It’s the most Edmonton thing you can do.

        Comment


        • #5
          I’m afraid restaurant reviews on C2E are supposed to consist of a couple of sentences about what you ate & poorly composed photos with terrible white balance & omnipresent alcoholic beverages.

          Please reformat & resubmit.
          Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

          Comment


          • #6
            Best part of that piece:

            But beyond the fantastical idealism of foodie culture, there’s the simple fact that cooking a decent meal or dining at the right restaurant is an act of leisure-class consumption, not a heroic or courageous feat to build your entire identity around. As former food critic John Lanchester asserts in The New Yorker, our choices about food are nowhere near the most important political choices we make. “If these tiny acts of consumer choice are the most meaningful actions in our lives,” Lanchester writes, “perhaps we aren’t thinking and acting on a sufficiently big scale.” He takes it a step further. “Imagine that you die and go to Heaven and stand in front of a jury made up of Thomas Jefferson, Eleanor Roosevelt, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Your task would be to compose yourself, look them in the eye, and say, ‘I was all about fresh, local, and seasonal.’”
            “Son, one day this will be an iconic structure shaping Edmonton’s skyline.”

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by noodle View Post
              I’m afraid restaurant reviews on C2E are supposed to consist of a couple of sentences about what you ate & poorly composed photos with terrible white balance & omnipresent alcoholic beverages.

              Please reformat & resubmit.
              Clever rabbit you are.


              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by IanO View Post
                Clever rabbit you are.
                No, Clever Rabbit is an excellent vegan restaurant on 124 St.
                Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

                Comment

                Working...
                X