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Is eating fat bad for you?

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  • Is eating fat bad for you?

    Your thoughts on eating fat, please.

    Mine: Since I was a teenager I've been told to watch the amount of fat I ate but always wondered how eating fat could turn into fat. I accepted the idea that it could cause heart problems but fat becoming fat seemed simplistic - like they'd confused the heart and circulation issues with the belly. Then over the years the official line seemed to be back-pedalling moving the line to avoid embarrassment. 'Oh, not all fats now, its saturated fats... then 'Oh, it's trans fats..."

    Then in 2001 I read a NYT article about sugar, blood glucose and the insulin response causing weight gain. Didn't hear anything more about it until I read Good Calories, Bad Calories a few years later - which was an extensively researched book.

    Well, now...

    The science of saturated fat: A big fat surprise about nutrition?
    NINA TEICHOLZ Tuesday 26 August 2014

    excerpt:

    "Challenging any of the conventional wisdom on dietary fat has long been a form of professional suicide for nutrition experts. And saturated fats, especially, are the third rail. But Krauss persevered and concluded in 2010, after reviewing all the scientific literature, that saturated fats could not be said to cause heart disease. In March, another group of scientists, including faculty from Cambridge and Harvard, came to the same conclusion after conducting a similar “meta-analysis”. These were stunning results. It seemed that saturated fat, our principal dietary culprit for decades, had been unfairly convicted.

    Yet the truth is there never has been solid evidence that these fats cause disease. We only believe this to be true because nutrition policy was derailed over the past half-century by personal ambition, bad science, politics, and bias. ..."

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...n-9692121.html

    'Fat doesn't make you fat': Nina Teicholz's big surprise
    Monday, January 26, 2015

    "LISTEN"

    "Ever think our understanding of fat and what's fattening is off? Today, science journalist Nina Teicholz takes us through what she says is the flawed thinking and the flawed science that has shaped nutrition and public health policies for decades. Get ready for a Big Fat Surprise. "

    "For decades now, saturated fats have been off the table for many Canadians. It's all in keeping with the dietary law of the land: Avoid the fats to keep cholesterol down, and ensure a healthy heart.... leading many to deny themselves the fat of the land.

    But now science journalist Nina Teicholz is cutting through that received wisdom, like a hot knife through forbidden butter. Her new book is called, "The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet." Nina Teicholz was in New York.

    We are hoping to speak to someone from Health Canada about our Food Guide later this week. But in the meantime... tell us what you think."


    http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode...-fat-surprise/

  • #2
    ^oh no, you aren't going to start a debate on whether eggs kill people are you? There are multiple studies, some which say the cholesterol does, and others which say it doesn't.

    Or are you going to debate whether bread makes you fat (even though there are countries where bread is the staple, yet peoples weight is less than North America)?

    I don't think there is any rocket science to any of this. If you eat too many calories, you get fat. Sugar and Fat both contain a lot of calories, so if your diet is over rich in either, you can get into trouble. By contrast, proetein makes you feel full, and preserves muscel. If you get plenty of vegetables for your vitamins and minerals, you meet your calorie and protein and fiber requirements, you are going to have a healthy diet whether its rich in carbs or fat, or wheat, or even sugar. Its all about moderation based on how active you are or aren't.
    Last edited by moahunter; 29-01-2015, 10:09 AM.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by moahunter View Post
      ^oh no, you aren't going to start a debate on whether eggs kill people are you? There are multiple studies, some which say the cholesterol does, and others which say it doesn't.

      Or are you going to debate whether bread makes you fat (even though there are countries where bread is the staple, yet peoples weight is less than North America)?

      I don't think there is any rocket science to any of this. If you eat too many calories, you get fat. Sugar and Fat both contain a lot of calories, so if your diet is over rich in either, you can get into trouble. By contrast, proetein makes you feel full, and preserves muscel. If you get plenty of vegetables for your vitamins and minerals, you meet your calorie and protein and fiber requirements, you are going to have a healthy diet whether its rich in carbs or fat, or wheat, or even sugar. Its all about moderation based on how active you are or aren't.
      Ahh, you must be a lot younger than me. I agree to many calories seem to lead to getting fat. Everyone has always believed that. Too much energy in - too little out = fat buildup - seems to make sense. (Though even now that's debatable because of recent discoveries about antibiotic destruction of various gut bacteria.)

      However, when I was younger fat and calories were the evil players in the weight gain debate. In those days, crazy things happened like movie theatres having to change the type of oil they used on popcorn because of the type of fat they'd used - as if people lived in movie theatres. It's like the 8 glasses a day of water 'requirement' that now pervades our society - these beliefs spread and persist for decades in common culture because they are learned it as kids, taught by parents and teacher and nutritionists and fitness "experts". It becomes religion in sense - taken as true on faith.

      So, besides the calorie effect, is fat still bad for you?


      Enjoy this read: (and note the fruit juice substitution)



      April 24-30; How About Some Popcorn With Your Fat?
      By WILLIAM GRIMES
      Published: May 1, 1994

      "The scariest thing at the movies isn't Jason or Freddy Krueger. It isn't even Mickey Rourke in a dramatic role. It's popcorn.

      In a report released last week, the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a national consumer group that specializes in food and nutrition issues, announced that the popcorn sold in the typical movie theater absolutely drips with unsaturated fat, the kind that raises blood cholesterol and clogs arteries.

      The culprit is not the popcorn itself but the superfatty coconut oil that most theaters use to pop it. That and the butter -- hydrogenated soybean oil in most cases -- that's drizzled on top. A medium-size buttered popcorn, the report said, contains more fat than a breakfast of bacon and eggs, a Big Mac and fries and a steak dinner combined. The report was published in the center's Nutrition Action Healthletter.

      "Theater popcorn ought to be the Snow White of snack foods, but it's been turned into Godzilla by being popped in highly saturated coconut oil," said Michael Jacobson, the center's executive director, lobbing this carefully composed sound bite at a press conference.

      The bad news in the report was delivered with an unmistakable "this will curl your hair" delight. Invoking the deadly Big Mac measure of comparison, it announced that a large unbuttered popcorn had the saturated fat equivalent of six Big Macs. With butter, that's eight Big Macs. The report did not say what happens to moviegoers who like to eat Big Macs along with their buttered popcorn. ..."
      ...
      "Ms. Flynn has a point. The average American sees five movies a year. Even if a medium popcorn is a fat festival in a box, is it reckless endangerment to indulge five times a year? "It all adds up," said Jayne Hurley, who wrote the report. "A small unbuttered popcorn is an entire day's worth of artery-clogging fat." ..."
      ...
      "Some of the hipper movie houses have dropped popcorn from the menu altogether, offering espresso and fruit juices at concession stands that fairly glow with good health. "

      http://www.nytimes.com/1994/05/01/we...-your-fat.html



      And here's one of my favourite Woody Allen movie clips - from the 1970s!!!

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D2fYguIX17Q

      Last edited by KC; 29-01-2015, 01:19 PM.

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      • #4
        I'm with the school of thought that a moderate amount of fat is not bad. Watch out for the trans fats though.

        In all honesty, a bit of fat in your meals will make you feel full faster and probably help you eat less.

        You can put it to the test: drink a glass of water and start a meal. Then compare against drinking a glass of 2%/**** milk and start a meal. You'd probably feel full sooner when you have that milk first.

        To add on, Japan has A LOT of fried foods options. But their diets are balanced and the sheer amount of walking the typical person does a day probably helps the typical Japanese person maintain their "slim" figures. Going on a tangent, our obsession with obesity seem to have started roughly the same time suburbs became popular. Driving everywhere and only taking a few hundred steps a day does not help....even if you have the best of diets
        Last edited by B.ike; 29-01-2015, 01:53 PM.

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        • #5
          Low-fat and fat free products can have as much or more calories then their regular counterparts; manufactures will pump them full of sugar, usually high fructose corn syrup, since its cheap, to make up the difference in flavour.

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          • #6
            Nothing is bad for a person if they take it in moderation. Some fats are worse than others. Take lard, you can imagine that sodidfying in your arteries and staying around for some time. Then it's the story of carbs vs calories. Low carb diets do work but a person would get bored real fast with limited food choices. As for obesity getting to be epidemic. I think it is effecting people earlier in their lives. To much sitting at home with Xboxes, TV, computers. Kids don't want to go out to play as they are into social media, it's easier to sit and talk on Skype then to meet outside and get fresh air. We don't manufacture stuff as much as we used to. There are more office jobs than physical labor jobs. We don't want to stretch our will power capabilities because we don't want to be without junk food. That's another thing. We don't want to cook from scratch anymore when it's too easy to go and buy pre-made meals. Meals that will be full of salt and preservatives and fat to make them taste good. I can imagine in 50 years time at the rate we are going 75% of the population will be overweight. That's if we don't get a handle on it.
            Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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            • #7
              Top_Dawg still giggles at etownboarder's concise but true overview of the typical North American diet:

              salt...sugar...fat...

              Actually in Top_Dawg's circles it would be amended to:

              beer...smokes...salt...sugar...fat...

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Top_Dawg View Post
                Top_Dawg still giggles at etownboarder's concise but true overview of the typical North American diet:

                salt...sugar...fat...

                Actually in Top_Dawg's circles it would be amended to:

                beer...smokes...salt...sugar...fat...

                You'll love that Woody Allen clip.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by B.ike View Post
                  Japan has A LOT of fried foods options. But their diets are balanced and the sheer amount of walking the typical person does a day probably helps the typical Japanese person maintain their "slim" figures.
                  Not only that, but it seems like most of their population smoke like chimneys over there. It probably helps them eat less.

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                  • #10
                    As a fitness buff, I have no fear of fats. Everything in moderation. Besides, it's been proven over and over that fats are necessary for brain development.

                    Wanna be fit? Eat less, cut out the crap, and get off your butt once in a while. How much fat you have is purely diet. Fitness and muscle comes from exercise.
                    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MrOilers View Post
                      Originally posted by B.ike View Post
                      Japan has A LOT of fried foods options. But their diets are balanced and the sheer amount of walking the typical person does a day probably helps the typical Japanese person maintain their "slim" figures.
                      Not only that, but it seems like most of their population smoke like chimneys over there. It probably helps them eat less.
                      They eat a lot of rice too, so much for the low carb equalling long life theory.

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                      • #12
                        Being fat or slim probably has more to do with genetics than the actual amount of fat you eat. Apparently lots of stuff in HK/Taiwan (puff pastries, buns, cooking) use lard cause it's more flavourful (which is was why that whole gutter oil thing, was so problematic).

                        So long as you eat stuff in moderation you're fine, since too much water is apparently bad for you too.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Chmilz View Post
                          Wanna be fit? Eat less, cut out the crap, and get off your butt once in a while. How much fat you have is purely diet. Fitness and muscle comes from exercise.
                          I agree, you can't get rid of fat through exercise, it just makes you more hungry. I am in a bulking phase right now so I increase my calories by about 500 over maintenance on workout day, then drop to maintenance on rest day. I don't exercise to lose fat though, just before summer I go into cutting phase, eat high protein, low calories, to get body fat closer to my goal (longer term goal of10%, at 13% right now). I try to hit my protein goal of about 150-170 grams on workout day, and 100 on rest day. I find it fun now keeping a rough track of this stuff, its just natural (didn't used to be), when I'm cutting its like a personal challenge to stand the hunger as long as I can (and no, you can't lose weight without feeling hungry sometimes).

                          I still eat big at restruants, I had a large lunch today and shared a bottle of wine. But, I won't eat anything at dinner aside from an isolate protein shake, and I'll be careful breakfast tomorrow to "make back" those calories. I get comments from friends (oh, you are skinny / can eat whatever you want) when they see me eat big at a dinner, but they don't see how careful I am before and after to "earn" it (and when you earn it, you really enjoy it).

                          I think the problem for most people is they never learn what their maintenance level of eating is, their weight slower creeps up in late 20's, early 30's. Some people wake up (I did) and change their lifestyle, others don't. Its all choice not genertics IMO, I went from 210 pounds to current 170 (took about 4 years) by changing my lifestyle, not a fad diet, anyone else can if they really want it. For me, I went from snacks of lays to snacks of apples and grapes, and nuts (high calorie but good fats, so in moderation). More recently I went from TV dinners, to eating instant rice (I stick soy sauce on it, which I know is horribile for salt, but I'm allowed the odd "failing" I figure), a beef paty and frozen vegies (same thing as TV dinner in esence, but less sugar). Other days I'll bake perogies, meatballs and chicken strips. Fresh fruit, baby carrots and a protein shake is my normal lunch. Eggs, tomatoes and toast for breakfast. There are lots of ways to do it though, I lost weight for a couple of years by eating TV dinners but limiting how much (not that healthy though I think). Heck, you can lose weight just smoking and drinking as long as you cut out most of the food (that's how most students stay slim isn't it?).
                          Last edited by moahunter; 29-01-2015, 05:03 PM.

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                          • #14
                            100% lifestyle moa, you nailed it. "Dieting" is a product that takes your money and does nothing. Just isolate shakes for dinner, huh? That would save me a lot of time cooking...
                            "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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                            • #15
                              Yeah, I eat pretty much whatever I want, including my fair share of greasy cheeseburgers. I also eat some healthier fare from time to time, and get off my butt and walk a hell of a lot. Never had a problem with health or weight.
                              Support the mob or mysteriously disappear...

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