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Restaurateurs making it on 104th Street: Downtown’s buzziest neighbourhood poses risk

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  • Restaurateurs making it on 104th Street: Downtown’s buzziest neighbourhood poses risk

    Restaurateurs making it on 104th Street: Downtown’s buzziest neighbourhood poses risk and reward
    http://www.edmontonjournal.com/enter...265/story.html

    Interesting article.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  • #2
    Good indepth look by Liane.
    www.decl.org

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    • #3
      I'm happy that some entrepreneurs are taking the risk and I applaud them.
      It's people like that who will make down town a fun place to go down to.
      I've already checked out Rostizado and can't wait to check out more new restaurants.
      I'm tired of the chain places like Joey's and Earl's. Plus it's nice to support local business'.
      Edmonton ~ It may not be perfect, but it's home~

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      • #4
        This might be the best article I've read since the launch of the Insight section.

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        • #5
          I'm excited about the seafood bar. I hope they do it up right.
          "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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          • #6
            Maybe you know Chmilz -- according to the article restaurant food costs are 10% higher in Edmonton. Why? Just a general overheated-Alberta-economy thing or something specific?

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            • #7
              Labour, transport, inflation.


              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ajs View Post
                Maybe you know Chmilz -- according to the article restaurant food costs are 10% higher in Edmonton. Why? Just a general overheated-Alberta-economy thing or something specific?
                For the most part. We're "off the beaten track" so transportation costs to get food here is higher, and distribution costs within Alberta are through the roof. Basic labour in warehousing and delivery drivers is approaching $20.00/hr here, while it's closer to minimum wage in the rest of the country. The entire vertical here is expensive. That food distributor in town pays the pickers more, the drivers more, the sales people more, all the admin staff more. The manufacturer/vendor pays their local sales and admin staff more.

                If it involves people, and food is extremely labour intensive, it costs more here.
                "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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