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Ageism to become discrimination in Alberta

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  • Ageism to become discrimination in Alberta

    Potentially a massive step forward for family friendly housing and a more inclusive community.

    ----

    Age will soon be included as a prohibited ground of discrimination under the Alberta Human Rights Act.

    An application to include age as a discriminating factor was granted at a hearing in Edmonton Court of Queen's Bench Friday after it was unopposed by the province.

    "We can now join the rest of Canada," said lawyer Allan Garber as he left the court with seniors' advocate Ruth Adria.



    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmont...925515?cmp=rss


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  • #2
    It is good news and interesting how it was under the radar for so long. On the other hand, what about these over 55 adult only complexes that are built. Will it affect those as 'ageism' is a two way street.
    Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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    • #3
      Specialty and senior housing likely will remain exempt, but still too early to know.


      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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      • #4
        So, are we changing the minimum voting age, etc?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Gemini View Post
          It is good news and interesting how it was under the radar for so long. On the other hand, what about these over 55 adult only complexes that are built. Will it affect those as 'ageism' is a two way street.
          Isn't much of downtown residential restricted to adults only? Hence downtown is anti-family - as we've discussed on pro-downtown threads.

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          • #6
            ^Doubt it. Some responsibilities come with maturity. If 5 year olds could vote Sponge Bob would be P M. Oh, on second thoughs...................
            Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by KC View Post
              Originally posted by Gemini View Post
              It is good news and interesting how it was under the radar for so long. On the other hand, what about these over 55 adult only complexes that are built. Will it affect those as 'ageism' is a two way street.
              Isn't much of downtown residential restricted to adults only? Hence downtown is anti-family - as we've discussed on pro-downtown threads.
              Much of Alberta is 'adult only'...


              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by KC View Post
                Originally posted by Gemini View Post
                It is good news and interesting how it was under the radar for so long. On the other hand, what about these over 55 adult only complexes that are built. Will it affect those as 'ageism' is a two way street.
                Isn't much of downtown residential restricted to adults only? Hence downtown is anti-family - as we've discussed on pro-downtown threads.
                Your logic is broken. "Downtown" isn't anti-family. The individual buildings which are, are, and the law which allows the individual buildings to be so is, but Downtown itself clearly is not.

                Ridiculous leap.
                Let's make Edmonton better.

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                • #9
                  Bingo....and....this applies city, region and Province-wide.


                  Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JayBee View Post
                    Originally posted by KC View Post
                    Originally posted by Gemini View Post
                    It is good news and interesting how it was under the radar for so long. On the other hand, what about these over 55 adult only complexes that are built. Will it affect those as 'ageism' is a two way street.
                    Isn't much of downtown residential restricted to adults only? Hence downtown is anti-family - as we've discussed on pro-downtown threads.
                    Your logic is broken. "Downtown" isn't anti-family. The individual buildings which are, are, and the law which allows the individual buildings to be so is, but Downtown itself clearly is not.

                    Ridiculous leap.
                    Of course it is a ridiculous leap. Similarly the buildings aren't anti-family either. Downtown isn't a thinking human. Just as companies, cities, political parties or religions can't be attributed such characterizations, and it is actual human beings, usually anonymous humans, making the decisions, determining policy etc., gross generalizations are expedient. So we all make such ridiculous leaps all the time.
                    Last edited by KC; 07-01-2017, 09:30 AM.

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                    • #11
                      How are the buildings not family friendly either? We have families in ours, multiples other have families. Amenity spaces, parks, nearby services and support, walkable, transit, schools, friends.

                      This is not a new idea or practice.

                      Come on now.


                      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                      • #12
                        Another thread (below) Personally I've never tried to move my family downtown so I only base my gross generalizations on what I read.


                        Adults only: Parents, families looking for places to rent in downtown Edmonton

                        http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/showt...ntown-Edmonton

                        Originally posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
                        Adults only: Parents, families looking for places to rent in downtown Edmonton
                        http://metronews.ca/news/edmonton/12...town-edmonton/

                        Looking at rental after rental and being turned away by landlords due to the building’s ‘no children’ policy, single mother Jodie McKague just about gave up on moving to Edmonton’s core with her daughter.

                        “I think a lot of people are shocked when you say it because it’s kind of discriminatory so when you say it, people don’t really believe you. But once you start looking in downtown proper, there’s so many signs that say ‘adult only’,” she said. “It’s a really difficult thing to explain to your child as well. My daughter just doesn’t understand why a building wouldn’t want kids in it.”

                        Vacancy rates have been consistently low in the city but potential tenants and local officials say that shouldn’t excuse the ‘no children’ policy found at many buildings.

                        Suzanne MacLean, executive director with the Oliver Centre, says clients have struggled to find a place to live in the core that is still affordable.

                        “Years ago, there was ton of family condos, family apartments. I’ve noticed the huge trends and all of the low income families got shoved out of downtown. Hopefully that changes,” she said, adding there are limited renting opportunities for families overall. “You can have a pet but you can’t have a child.”

                        Representatives of the Landlord and Tenant Advisory Board say it isn’t a problem they’ve heard of but say that it is a landlord’s choice if they’re going to have an adult only building or not.

                        Despite it being at the discretion of the building owner, McKague hopes that landlords consider young families to help bring new residents into downtown Edmonton.

                        “I think the idea that if you’re a pet owner or if you have children that means you’re irresponsible or disruptive neighbour is really outdated and isn’t really reflective in reality,” said McKague.

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                        • #13
                          Another interesting thread largely addressing the issue of inappropriate design but including this post below.


                          Making a family friendly downtown - article

                          http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/showt...wntown-article


                          Originally posted by urbanroo View Post
                          I've just found this very informative thread after encountering unexpected difficulties trying to relocate my family to Edmonton. The problem already raised about a lack of 3-bedroom units is certainly something I encountered, but even worse is that so many of the units I looked at were in buildings that have restrictive covenants against children. In case you are interested, I cut and paste text (below) from a letter I wrote to the mayor about the issue, though whether he can do anything about it, I'm not sure; I'm still learning about all the different constraints to raising a family in Edmonton. We'll be moving to a condo on 104 street this fall--it wasn't ideal, but it was the best we could do. In terms of the debate above about what constitutes downtown and whether the very center of town is suitable for families, I guess it depends on the individual; my family currently lives in a very urban neighborhood (more so than anything anywhere in Canada, probably including Toronto) and we just love it. I'm not asking that Edmonton become New York or London, but city leaders should recognize that as Edmonton continues to mature, it will attract families who value urban living.

                          Dear Mayor Iveson,

                          [...]

                          I grew up in Edmonton during the 1990s. I left the city for university and have had the opportunity, through work and study, to live in some of the world’s most dynamic urban centers: London, Paris, Osaka, San Francisco, and most recently Chicago. I have, however, always called Edmonton home and it was thus with great excitement that my young family found out we would be moving back to Edmonton this fall. Since my suburban, car-centric upbringing I have grown to value immensely the virtues of pedestrianized urban living: this is true in terms of health and recreation; the environment; finances; the prospects of small businesses; community sociability; and overall convenience and quality of life. This conviction has become even stronger as I’ve become a husband and father. I can’t think of anything more annoying than having to strap a struggling toddler into a car seat whenever we want to do groceries or go out for lunch. In addition, though I realize I might be in the minority on this point (old slogans like “Albertans love their cars” have an almost talismanic power), I find the climate and snowfall in Edmonton to be particularly ill-suited to having to drive everywhere (Scandinavia demonstrates the virtues of urban, pedestrian living in a cold climate). Why drive on ice and snow to an enormous parking lot (South Edmonton Common comes to mind) only to have to walk the same distance to a shop or restaurant than one would have to in a dense urban environment?

                          When we recently visited Edmonton on a house-hunting trip, we accordingly wanted to live in the downtown core or in Oliver, where we would be able to continue the lifestyle that we so value. In particular we were attracted to the Grandin area for its high-density residential development, its leafy and salubrious streets, its proximity to the LRT and to our wonderful river valley and its many green spaces. There was, however, a recurring problem that persistently frustrated out attempts to find a home: age restrictive covenants. Despite the fact that there are very few three-bedroom condos in the city, we were happy to make do and purchase a two-bedroom condo, and we found several that we liked. One, in particular (in the Grandin Manor) we fell in love with. But in each case we were stymied by “adult only” restrictions. This is something I have never encountered in any other city. On the one hand I recognize the need for assisted living homes for the elderly, but I am totally perplexed by the fact that the majority of homes we looked at in Edmonton had restrictions against children. I find the legality of all this rather dubious, though I am not qualified professionally to comment. What I do know is that such restrictions serve to impoverish an urban community. Children are the lifeblood of any society, they are the future, they are what most people, at some point in their lives, come to value above all else. A community that prevents children from living in it is bound, literally, to be sterile. It will be a place void of any vibrancy or dynamism. Segregated cities are always the more impoverished for it: this applies to race and social class, but it also applies to age. Diversity is almost always a virtue, and if downtown Edmonton is to become a dynamic, livable community, it is vital that city leaders do everything possible to lift any sort of restriction that prevents families from living in the core of our city.

                          [...]

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                          • #14
                            While this is a step in the right direction to ending housing discrimination against families, according to a response I received from Edmonton-Centre MLA (David Shepherd) after this news broke, it's not so simple.

                            According to him:
                            It’s important to note, however, that the definition of ‘age’ in the Alberta Human Rights Act (AHRA) is “18 years or older.” This is common in most jurisdictions across Canada, though B.C. defines it as 19 and older and Ontario lowers it to 16 in regards to housing. And given that adult-only condominiums have previously argued that they aren’t discriminating on the basis of family status (i.e. – a parent-child relationship) but on the basis of age, it may require a court or human rights challenge to clearly define the new precedent.
                            He has however assured me he will be keeping in touch with the minister as these changes to the AHRA are being drafted to ensure that families (like my own) do not experience discrimination in housing options. Will be interesting to see how this pans out.
                            Last edited by stevester; 07-01-2017, 10:08 AM.

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                            • #15
                              That's correct, however it just needs a few new families to challenge it and force the issue. We have and will be requesting this to occur and have a few willing participants.


                              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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