Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

School Closures and maybe "Openings"

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • School Closures and maybe "Openings"

    How do schools fit into neighbourhoods and what does an opening or closure do for that neighbourhood?


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  • #2
    A school opening anchors a community. A school closing essentially guarantees its slow demise, unless there's an abundance and there's alternatives close by.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Chmilz View Post
      A school opening anchors a community. A school closing essentially guarantees its slow demise, unless there's an abundance and there's alternatives close by.
      This

      Schools closing singals the last hope for a community. As much as there may be other options or social / community uses for the space, there is no longer the attraction or reason to move into a neighbourhood for new families.
      youtube.com/BrothersGrim
      facebook.com/BrothersGrimMusic

      Comment


      • #4
        Families with babies will move once they get to school age.
        The neighborhood is more than likely filled with elderly people.
        When they die their off spring may keep the property and rent it out.
        Renters are not as invested in the neighborhood like owners are. Renters do not
        rally for paved back lanes and better lightning etc:
        Property starts to deteriorate somewhat leaving the area more downtrodden and less
        likely that people will want to buy there.
        Small business like hairdressers, barbers, day cares start to move out. That leaves room for pawn shops, sex shops, pay day loans furthering the demise of the area.
        If a school re-opens families move back into the neighborhood. The school will act as a catalyst for gatherings giving the area a more neighborly feeling and there is a good chance the community will start to rally for improvements in their area.
        .
        Last edited by Gemini; 30-04-2010, 05:52 PM.
        Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

        Comment


        • #5
          School Closure Moratorium Committee Meeting - Urban Sprawl

          "Given the amount of public interest on the issue of school closures, the Board's School Closure Moratorium Committee has also committed to hold a series of public meetings over the next several months. Each meeting will focus on a topic related to an issue that affects school closures. Members of the public will have the opportunity to address the committee by contacting the Board Office. All public meetings will be held in McCauley Chambers at the Centre for Education (One Kingsway). The first meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, April 19, 2011 from 2 to 4 p.m. and will focus on urban sprawl. Additional meetings will also be held between May and October 2011. Further information about these meetings will be posted on the Board of Trustees section of Edmonton Public Schools' website -"

          http://districtsite.epsb.ca/root/cal...ntSortType=asc

          Comment


          • #6
            Edmonton Public Schools looks at closing older schools

            Lifting of moratorium could see new facilities built in mature neighborhoods

            BY ANDREA SANDS, EDMONTON JOURNAL JANUARY 13, 2013

            0

            STORYPHOTOS ( 1 )



            William Yeh, 11, from left, Carrie Watt and her daughter Meredith, 6, Ruth Callao and her daughter Sophia, 6, and Isaac Chow-Turner, 11. Now that the moratorium on school closures has expired, Watt fears smaller schools like Lansdowne could be consolidated with other Edmonton public schools facing declining enrolments.
            Photograph by: John Lucas , Edmonton Journal
            EDMONTON - It is financially impossible to keep all public schools in Edmonton open now that a moratorium on school closures has ended, although changes won’t be immediate, says a senior manager with the school district.

            However, a new approach to tackle the costly problem of underpopulated schools in older neighbourhoods might make future school closures more palatable for parents, says Lorne Parker, managing director of planning, property management and student transportation for Edmonton Public Schools.

            http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...107/story.html


            Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

            Comment


            • #7
              It really is: two steps forward, one step back for our mature neighborhoods. City council and school boards operate completely independently of each other, and waves of young kids in the fringes get the new schools, as the older neighborhoods get gutted. Then in 30 years, the wave will force those schools to shut down.

              I have never been a proponent of "penalizing" folks for living in the burbs, but in the case of schools I think there may be an exception made.
              Over promise and under deliver. It’s the most Edmonton thing you can do.

              Comment


              • #8
                Interesting idea, and probably one I'd support. I find it frustrating that I bought a house a few years ago in a mature neighbourhood that's now faced with school closures all around it, while my brother lives in the middle of nowhere, but has a new school nearby. If some of these older schools close, and a new one is built, that's a lot better than a bunch of schools closing and a simple reno done to one of them.
                They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yah you do get the distinct impression that the new developments are cannibalizing school infrastructure. What they really need it a moratorium on building new schools, which will make central living more attractive (when they get tired of driving their kids into the city) and maybe bring some balance in how the demographics are spread across the city. Continue on this path and we will just repeat the process in another generation or two, a perpetual cycle until we run out of land.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    The way I look at it is most people who buy on the outer fringe burbs could/can afford to drive. Why not bus their students into mature areas for schooling?

                    We have enough land / buildings to make sure all students in Edmonton fit comfortably AS IS. We just need to get creative and stop bending over backwards for the suburbs
                    youtube.com/BrothersGrim
                    facebook.com/BrothersGrimMusic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The problem is that while the city benefits from keeping small schools open in mature neighbourhoods, there is no benefit to the school board. I understand why they make the decisions they do but I think the city at the boards should be actively working together.

                      A good example of the benefits of keeping small schools open is Westglen, where my kids go. It was almost closed and had enrolment falling below 100 students. It was spared and in the years since enrolment has climbing dramatically and the school is thriving. So is the neighbourhood. I know of multiple families that have moved to the neighbourhood because it has a school.

                      I wonder how many people move to the burbs not because they want to but because they feel they have no choice.

                      "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        When the issue was last debated in 2012, the final vote was 5-4 in favour of modernizing older schools first. Leading that push was trustee Heather MacKenzie.

                        “We view maintenance of our existing buildings as key to sustaining them and keeping them open,” she said.

                        Eight new schools had just been built, MacKenzie said, and it was finally time to spend dollars on fixing up older ones. “Each new school that we received guts a number of other schools in the district that are already under-maintained.”

                        It doesn’t hurt kids in new suburbs to bus a half-hour to an existing school, MacKenzie said.

                        Trustee Michael Janz led the fight against making modernization the priority.

                        “As a board, if we pass this, we’re collectively bating the ‘burbs,” Janz said. “We’re telling people out there that our existing maintenance needs trump our new needs.”

                        http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...469/story.html


                        Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes Janz, how dare we make our inner city viable for families at the risk of unbuilt suburbs. What an *****. All parts of the city deserve good schools. Not just the shiny new suburbs. Some of those old schools are in disgusting condition.
                          "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Chmilz View Post
                            All parts of the city deserve good schools. Not just the shiny new suburbs. Some of those old schools are in disgusting condition.
                            Absolutely!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by IanO View Post

                              Trustee Michael Janz led the fight against making modernization the priority.

                              “As a board, if we pass this, we’re collectively bating the ‘burbs,” Janz said. “We’re telling people out there that our existing maintenance needs trump our new needs.”
                              Thats exactly what we are saying! Man **** the burbs! 95% of people out there are living in the burbs because they have $$$. It is not cheaper to live in the burbs.

                              Why are we punishing inner city / low income schools and bending over backwards to families with money?
                              youtube.com/BrothersGrim
                              facebook.com/BrothersGrimMusic

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X