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  • Becoming a tech city means celebrating its wins and losses

    Becoming a tech city means celebrating its wins and losses

    Innovation and tech have become widely talked about subjects among business and cities globally. From California’s Silicon Valley and London’s Silicon Roundabout to innovation ventures across the globe in Asia, tech is a hot topic that every city wants to capitalize on. While becoming a tech city has many advantages, achieving that status is hard work. Edmonton has immense potential to become a tech city, so we should be ready for the journey to be filled with both victories and hardships. Embracing Edmonton’s future as a tech city means preparing for bumps in the road.

    What does becoming a tech city mean?
    Becoming a tech city means keeping a finger on the pulse of technology and innovation, and not just anticipating growth but initiating it. As a tech city, we would focus on innovation, pioneering solutions to problems, and create a future-focused ecosystem. The advantages are many: From boosting the city’s economy, improving the average taxpayers quality of life and maximizing efficiencies in all its areas, the innovation game is rife with opportunities.

    Austin, Texas once looked a lot like Edmonton…
    An example of a tech city emerging in the world of innovation is Austin. In the 1990s, Austin acquired the nickname “Silicon Hills” due to the success of various popular corporations such as Intel, Indeed and Texas Instruments. The city gained importance as a burgeoning tech city, known for its booming internet companies.
    While this period was marked by significant economic growth and recognition for the city, it was soon followed by the dot-com burst.
    This downturn resulted in job losses and an inevitable dip in the economy. However, instead of letting that defeat define the city, Austin continued to fight for its reputation as a tech city. Today, not only is Austin known for being a successful tech hub, but it is known for its diversified economy, earning it a number 2 position on Forbes’ ‘The Best Cities for Jobs 2018’ list. With a steadily booming economy, the city owes its financial and labour triumphs to its tech involvement.

    What does this mean for Edmonton?
    One takeaway from Austin’s success story, is the importance of preparing for both the booms and the hardships along the road to a technology-focused economy. Correctly harnessed, Edmonton’s potential could transform the city into a thriving technology hub.
    Edmonton and Austin share many common parallels highlighting this potential. Both cities foster rich arts and cultural environments and are known as creative hubs. They are also both college towns with reputed educational institutions.
    Austin was able to convert a steady stream of high-talent graduates into a robust and stable technology economy. But it wasn’t easy. Edmonton has the talent being generated here and the drive to apply that talent here at home. But it will take hard work and the ability to keep moving forward even in the face of setbacks.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  • #2
    Edmonton doesn't want to be Oil Town anymore



    June 11, 2019
    |
    Jordan Heath-Rawlings






    Can a city change its fortunes by changing the industry its known for? Edmonton, Alberta is trying. Over the past two years, the city has launched a comprehensive strategy to attract medical research talent from around the world, by offering researchers access to data, artificial intelligence and industrial design resources that aim to make breakthroughs faster. It's called Health City—and every couple months, we hear a new story of one of those breakthroughs, or about an adaptation of existing technology.
    But can a smallish city in Alberta really transform itself into an international medical research hub? What kinds of headline-grabbing announcements will it take? What can the city expect in terms of cooperation from the provincial and federal governments? And...what's coming out of these labs next?
    GUEST: Steven Sandor, editor of Avenue Edmonton


    Comment


    • #3
      ^

      ...can a smallish city in alberta really transform itself into an international medical research hub?

      from wikipedia:

      "The Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit academic medical center based in Rochester, Minnesota, focused on integrated clinical practice, education, and research.It employs more than 4,500 physicians and scientists, along with another 58,400 administrative and allied health staff.The practice specializes in treating difficult cases through tertiary care and destination medicine. It is home to the top ten ranked Mayo Clinic Alix School of Medicine in addition to many of the largest, best regarded residency education programs in the United States. It spends over $660 million a year on research and has more than 3,000 full-time research personnel."

      rochester, minnesota is a city of about 115,000 in a metropolitan region with a population of about 215,000. like edmonton, it's also not known for its attractive climate.
      "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

      Comment


      • #4
        If someone/something can match the
        Mayo Clinic receives about $634 million in research funding from the government, foundations, industry groups and benefactor gifts"
        part, it'll be on its way!

        https://www.beckershospitalreview.co...yo-clinic.html

        "Mayo Clinic is funded by 3 investors. Jay Alix and U.S. Department of Defense are the most recent investors."
        https://www.crunchbase.com/organization/mayoclinic

        How successful would the Mayo Clinic be without government funding?

        You have to look a bit more carefully in terms of how they earmark their money. While much of their income is derived from their healthcare unit, their research division is heavily depend on government funding.
        https://www.quora.com/How-successful...rnment-funding

        Rochester just happened to be where it was started by its (resident) founders, not a place that was "chosen" for a medical research hub.
        I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

        Comment


        • #5
          I think we’ve done a lot over the years to foster tech development. However oil and gas bring money into Alberta on such a large scale that I don’t think piddly little enterprises and endeavours can easily come to match what we receive as sellers of our resources. A billion here and a billion there would be nice but the scale of our problem and the technological risk we face means that we have to become extremely careful in how we use the proceeds we receive.

          Just a couple examples of past support:



          “1980s

          Late 1980s: Some money from the Heritage Fund was used for capital projects, which helped improve Albertans' quality of life by developing parks, enhancing libraries, and maintaining our forests. These projects were also used to diversify the economy and meet the needs of a growing population. Some of these projects include Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research, Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund, Alberta Children's Provincial General Hospital (Calgary), Walter C. Mackenzie Health Services Centre (Edmonton), University of Alberta Clinical Research Building, Pine Ridge Reforestation Nursery Enhancement, Alberta Family Life and Substance Abuse Foundation, renewable energy research, and applied cancer research. These projects have been paid for and benefit Albertans today.

          1987: In 1987, the transfer of natural resource royalty revenues to the Fund were stopped.”

          https://open.alberta.ca/dataset/80ee...l-timeline.pdf


          Health researchers tense about future of Alberta funding – Edmonton Journal
          Dec 22, 2015

          “A move to consolidate four Alberta government agencies that fund research has some health scientists worried that patients will pay the price.
          At issue is whether a pool of money that has for three decades bolstered medical research in the province could now be tapped by others, such as environmental researchers or biotechnology companies.

          Health research is unique, and should have a protected source of funding, says David Evans, vice-dean of research at the University of Alberta’s faculty of medicine and dentistry.”

          https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...lberta-funding

          Edmonton Research Park

          “Established in 1980, the ERP manages a 243-acre campus for research and development facilities and is home to innovation centres with a variety of amenities and services.”

          http://www.edmontonresearchpark.com/space
          Last edited by KC; 11-06-2019, 01:18 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Spudly View Post
            ...

            Rochester just happened to be where it was started by its (resident) founders, not a place that was "chosen" for a medical research hub.
            true enough...

            but also proof that edmonton - like rochester - probably does have the potential. if anything, we have a lot more infrastructure (university, hospitals, etc.) in place to support the move than Rochester did.

            whether or not we have the commitment and the wherewithal to capitalize on that potential is something altogether different.
            "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kcantor View Post
              whether or not we have the commitment and the wherewithal to capitalize on that potential is something altogether different.
              Looking at the big orange dot surrounded by all the blue, it's not really about what commitments & wherewithal Edmonton has, as the rest of Alberta has decided to throw their support behind those that feel the current level of funding is too high & that public sector workers should not be entitled to the same high wages & high quality of life afforded workers in other sectors of the economy.

              Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

              Comment


              • #8
                I think Edmonton getting Google and other hi-tech enterprises is promising. Edmonton will need to keep being assertive.
                "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

                Comment


                • #9
                  AltaML (@altaml_com)
                  2019-06-11, 10:52
                  We're incredibly excited to announce our partnership with #AIMco to build #AI and #MLapplications for investment management. This partnership is a great opportunity to attract and develop talent in #AB's growing #tech industry. #YEG #YEGTech #ABTechpic.twitter.com/NedLLHUhK4
                  Speaking of high tech.
                  “Canada is the only country in the world that knows how to live without an identity,”-Marshall McLuhan

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by noodle View Post
                    Originally posted by kcantor View Post
                    whether or not we have the commitment and the wherewithal to capitalize on that potential is something altogether different.
                    Looking at the big orange dot surrounded by all the blue, it's not really about what commitments & wherewithal Edmonton has, as the rest of Alberta has decided to throw their support behind those that feel the current level of funding is too high & that public sector workers should not be entitled to the same high wages & high quality of life afforded workers in other sectors of the economy.

                    [IMG]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cd/Alberta_provincial_election_2019_-_Results_by_Riding.svg/800px-Alberta_provincial_election_2019_-_Results_by_Riding.svg.png

                    “the rest of Alberta has decided to throw their support behind those that feel the current level of funding is too high & that public sector workers should not be entitled to the same high wages & high quality of life afforded workers in other sectors of the economy. ”

                    You’re kidding right?
                    Last edited by KC; 11-06-2019, 08:08 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by KC View Post
                      You’re kidding right?
                      Absolutely not.
                      Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Calgary's tax challenges: https://edmontonjournal.com/opinion/...-budget-is-too
                        "Talk minus action equals zero." - Joe Keithley, D. O. A.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One year after $17 million raise, LoginRadius moves headquarters to Vancouver

                          “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Good for them. Sounds like a lot of their money was raised in Vancouver. Too bad we couldn't at least keep a branch office.
                            My antidepressent drug of choice is running. Cheaper with less side effects!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A reminder that we need to have more support, resources, opportunities to scale here.


                              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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