Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Hiring experience, stereotypes

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Hiring experience, stereotypes

    I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts on job hunting, etc.

    The quote at the bottom caught my eye this morning because it's what I love; rational thought over typecasts.

    In my case, over a year ago I quit my position of ten years to take time off to spend some more time with my family, do a major renovation, volunteer work, etc. - and then pursue a new hopefully socially valuable career that I could work at well into what most people consider "the retirement years". So I'm about to start looking and of course will face (if it really exists), 'older worker' discrimination.

    Ironically, when I was young graduate I never understood the idea that younger hires were preferential to older hires - but I heard it a number of times over the years. Things like "Let's get some younger people in here..". I later worked with people across all age groups and still don't understand it. One former boss, a great old engineer, worked to age 87 and at any I'd have loved to work under him at any time.


    Words of Jim Chanos, Hedge Fund manager:

    "JC: The thing I look for most is intellectual curiosity. One of the best analysts we
    ever had was an art history major from Columbia. She had no formal business school training. She was so good because she was very intellectually curious. She was never afraid to ask why and if she didn’t understand something she would go figure out everything she could about it. This is almost something that you can’t train. You either have it or you don’t."

  • #2
    I remember being told that people like to hire people who are similar to them, who seem to have a similar outlook, attitude and personality. I think this is true, and its why many organizations form a particular culture, a group of like minded individuals, which can be a strength (similar goals) and weakness (lack of diversity).

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah, a friend called it: "Like Hires Like". That might be good for some businesses and catastrophic for others.

      Comment


      • #4
        As an employer I do have certain criteria when hiring people. My criteria are based on the needs of my business and that goes far beyond ability or competence. You have to understand that as a business owner I have to make decisions that are good for my business.

        For example, I need people who will relate well to my customers. I need people who can speak English clearly but I also need diversity in culture. With my most recent hire I was adamant that I needed a young white girl in order to balance the demographics in my business and as a result I turned away qualified applicants because of their skin color and age. If all my staff are brown skinned I will have a hard time attracting Caucasian customers. That's just the way it is. People are more comfortable dealing with other people from their own cultures. (You may think I am not justified but if you knew the type of business I ran you would understand)

        When I worked in the IT field I know that the company I worked for preferred to hire young NAIT or U of A grads because they were so eager to learn new technologies and prove themselves. They were like energizer bunnies.

        I can also understand why EDO Japan prefers to hire Asians. As a customer I would rather buy Asian food from an Asian. And I would rather buy Indian food from an Indian. If I walked into a surfing shop I would not expect to be greeted by a middle aged overweight woman. And when I go to a medical specialist I prefer if they look like they've got some experience under their belt.

        My point is that discriminatory hiring is justified if it makes sense for the business. Employers will always try to cater to their customers demands and expectations, even if it means turning away a qualified candidate based on age, gender or ethnicity. Nobody should be surprised by this.

        Comment


        • #5
          The latest hiring taboo: class - The Globe and Mail

          “All listed hobbies, although some were “upper class” (sailing, polo and classical music) while others were"‘lower class" (pick-up soccer, track and field and country music). The result? Sixteen per cent of the first group got a callback, compared to 1 per cent of the second.”

          https://www.theglobeandmail.com/busi...g-taboo-class/

          Comment


          • #6
            Try to find a restaurant where the hostess is not a young, beautiful lady in a short dress and high heels.

            Don't try to tell me that those are job requirements.
            Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
              Try to find a restaurant where the hostess is not a young, beautiful lady in a short dress and high heels.

              Don't try to tell me that those are job requirements.
              Hmm, so you’re suggesting that young, beautiful ladies in short dresses is all that one can encounter out there?

              When I was younger - and single - I’d have loved to take on that challenge.
              Last edited by KC; 20-09-2018, 05:42 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                I had a friend in his 40's get a job in a restaurant where part of his job was seating people. Many assumed that he was the owner or manager.
                Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Try an Albert's or a Smitty's
                  I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
                    Try to find a restaurant where the hostess is not a young, beautiful lady in a short dress and high heels.

                    Don't try to tell me that those are job requirements.
                    That depends how you define "job requirements".

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      One word, "cleavage"

                      My daughter worked at Chili's on Whyte and after hiring her, she was expected to serve customers on the third floor terrace, taking plates of food and drinks from the ground floor kitchen in high heels, a short dress and v-neck top. She was an experienced waitress and would only wear moderate heels, a buttoned shirt and moderate length skirt. Management pressured her to conform but she protested that the male staff wore normal shoes or runners, buttoned shirts and pants. They did not fire her but gave her less hours and jobs like cleaning drains to get her to quit.
                      Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Spudly View Post
                        Try an Albert's or a Smitty's
                        Let's not go there.

                        I prefer my food to not come in a trough.
                        Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
                          One word, "cleavage"

                          My daughter worked at Chili's on Whyte and after hiring her, she was expected to serve customers on the third floor terrace, taking plates of food and drinks from the ground floor kitchen in high heels, a short dress and v-neck top. She was an experienced waitress and would only wear moderate heels, a buttoned shirt and moderate length skirt. Management pressured her to conform but she protested that the male staff wore normal shoes or runners, buttoned shirts and pants. They did not fire her but gave her less hours and jobs like cleaning drains to get her to quit.
                          I have a young adult daughter as well so I understand where you're coming from but the fact is that the atmosphere is a big part of what makes a restaurant successful, and the people who work there are part of the atmosphere. Just as we want the furniture to look nice, we also want the servers to look nice. High heels, short skirts and V-necks make girls look nice. There's no getting around that.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Then you've obviously never been to either and just want to hear yourself b!tch about something... as usual.
                            I am in no way entitled to your opinion...

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Vincent View Post
                              Originally posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
                              One word, "cleavage"

                              My daughter worked at Chili's on Whyte and after hiring her, she was expected to serve customers on the third floor terrace, taking plates of food and drinks from the ground floor kitchen in high heels, a short dress and v-neck top. She was an experienced waitress and would only wear moderate heels, a buttoned shirt and moderate length skirt. Management pressured her to conform but she protested that the male staff wore normal shoes or runners, buttoned shirts and pants. They did not fire her but gave her less hours and jobs like cleaning drains to get her to quit.
                              I have a young adult daughter as well so I understand where you're coming from but the fact is that the atmosphere is a big part of what makes a restaurant successful, and the people who work there are part of the atmosphere. Just as we want the furniture to look nice, we also want the servers to look nice. High heels, short skirts and V-necks make girls look nice. There's no getting around that.
                              Women are not furniture. Apparently ypu'd consider Hooters to be fine dining due to the short shorts and tight t-shirts.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X