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Best tower orientation - south side plots

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  • Best tower orientation - south side plots

    I was reading about the new tower(s) that may be built on the south side of Whyte Avenue and had a thought that the orientation of such buildings (on the south side of avenues) might be a consideration in order to minimize the shadowing effect on the street and the opposing north side structures.

    So, would a rotation of such towers add meaningful amounts of light onto the streetscapes at critical times considering the smaller resulting tower footprint? (Considering light-wise that it wouldn't be a wash. .i.e. The amount of shadowing at noon wouldn't be the same. Though, forces a smaller square on the site if front-to-back depth isn't increased.)



    http://cdn-1.analyzemath.com/middle_...grade_9_11.gif


    Additionally, there wouldn't be anymore purely north-facing units.
    Last edited by KC; 23-04-2016, 10:49 AM.

  • #2
    Messes up the layout due to the core, see Icon.


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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    • #3
      Originally posted by IanO View Post
      Messes up the layout due to the core, see Icon.
      Sorry, I don't follow. Main floor layout I presume.

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      • #4
        Offset messes things up.


        Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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        • #5
          Originally posted by IanO View Post
          Offset messes things up.
          properly detailed, any transfer beams needed outside the core wouldn't be any larger or more expensive than often seen for other reasons and cantilevers could eliminate some of them. the core could stay angled through the parkade/podium with decent planning taking up the non square spaces.
          "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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          • #6
            Could, but not a good way to design.


            Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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            • #7
              Originally posted by IanO View Post
              Could, but not a good way to design.
              i suppose that depends on whether your design priorities are on the cheapest way to build or on things like right to light...
              "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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              • #8
                ^uhhh, this is Edmonton. Where do you think developer priorities lie?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by kcantor View Post
                  Originally posted by IanO View Post
                  Could, but not a good way to design.
                  i suppose that depends on whether your design priorities are on the cheapest way to build or on things like right to light...
                  Orientation is critical, but just reminding folks about other factors that impact things as well that you might not see.

                  Taller, thinner is a good option.


                  Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by IanO View Post
                    Originally posted by kcantor View Post
                    Originally posted by IanO View Post
                    Could, but not a good way to design.
                    i suppose that depends on whether your design priorities are on the cheapest way to build or on things like right to light...
                    Orientation is critical, but just reminding folks about other factors that impact things as well that you might not see.

                    Taller, thinner is a good option.
                    even when taller, thinner messes up the layout due to the core and is also both more expensive and less efficient?
                    "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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                    • #11
                      How about this?



                      http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-e3hwheWmjs...dimensions.gif

                      Also, stepping back the upper floors away from the street would allow the sun arcing towards its zenith to shine more light on the street or maybe just further out towards the structures.

                      The angled portions of the building would also provide improved view up and down the avenue and maybe even improve the early morning / late afternoon light within the building.
                      Last edited by KC; 24-04-2016, 05:20 PM.

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                      • #12
                        Way more here than I want to read or understand...

                        http://sustainabilityworkshop.autode...s-calculations


                        I guess it's called solar access.

                        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_access
                        Last edited by KC; 24-04-2016, 05:26 PM.

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                        • #13
                          Icon I/II, Omega - terrible transfer beams, not integrated into the design of the podium. Starbucks in Omega is a good example.
                          www.decl.org

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                          • #14
                            Bingo


                            Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by GreenSPACE View Post
                              Icon I/II, Omega - terrible transfer beams, not integrated into the design of the podium. Starbucks in Omega is a good example.
                              although that's much like saying we have some awful examples of using stucco and punched windows in mid rise buildings so we should stop building mid rise buildings...

                              there is no difference in [wrongly] using poorly executed transfer beams instead of poor choices in materials to make an elemental judgement and extending it to the entire structure and not the individually poorly executed elements.
                              "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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