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  • Timber skyscrapers

    80 stories tall...

    Timber skyscrapers could transform London's skyline -- ScienceDaily

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0408102359.htm

  • #2
    No thanks, that building could light up and burn down in 15 minutes. No one in such a building would survive.
    Edmonton first, everything else second.

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    • #3
      That article should have been dated April 1
      Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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      • #4
        Looks like they're serious and it looks like the fire issues have been dealt with:

        Tall Tinder: Are Wooden Skyscrapers Really Fire Safe?

        Another major test was recently published by a group called FPInnovations in Canada. They tested CLT panels as walls and floors to demonstrate that the panels have a certain level of fire performance comparable to non-combustible building elements like concrete, for example.

        The tests showed the walls and floors could be designed for up to three hours of fire resistance, in many cases exceeding the code requirement for structural element fire resistance ratings.
        They're not talking about cut wood, this is all laminates.

        "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by ThomasH View Post
          No thanks, that building could light up and burn down in 15 minutes. No one in such a building would survive.
          you do know these are heavy timber and composite timber structures that are not stick framed with 2 x 4's?

          heavy timbers actually perform better in a fire than structural steel because they don't burn and they don't lose their structural integrity in a fire The outer 3/4 inch will char which then insulates and deprives the fire of new material to burn. the interior doesn't lose its structural integrity the way steel does Shen exposed to heat

          timber also captures co2 and is considerably less energy intensive to manufacture than either steel or concrete.
          "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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          • #6
            It would mean a boom for BC forest industry if we start doing this. How about a new Telus Tinder Box House for Burnaby. Call the Timber Kings from Williams Lake.
            Last edited by Drumbones; 09-04-2016, 10:25 AM.
            Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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            • #7
              Seriously though, if it is scientifically sound this could be a boon for the forest industry. Tree huggers may not like it. Trees supply most of the worlds oxygen.
              Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Drumbones View Post
                Seriously though, if it is scientifically sound this could be a boon for the forest industry. Tree huggers may not like it. Trees supply most of the worlds oxygen.
                No they don't. The majority of the O2 in the atmosphere is generated by phytoplankton in the oceans.

                "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Drumbones View Post
                  Seriously though, if it is scientifically sound this could be a boon for the forest industry. Tree huggers may not like it. Trees supply most of the worlds oxygen.
                  on a life cycle basis, trees release considerable co2 when left to rot. harvesting the timber is actually a very productive method of sequestering that co2.
                  "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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                  • #10
                    From that same article:



                    "The type of wood these new buildings would use is regarded as a 'crop'. The amount of crop forest in the world is currently expanding. Canada alone could produce more than 15billion m³ of crop forest in the next 70 years, enough to house around a billion people...

                    At present, the world's tallest timber building is a 14-storey apartment block in Bergen, Norway....

                    Perhaps the most obvious concern for potential residents of homes built primarily from timber is fire risk. However, the team involved in the project said the proposed building would eventually meet or exceed every existing fire regulation currently in place for steel and concrete buildings.

                    Recent research has also shown that timber buildings can have positive effects on their user and occupant's health. Some recent studies have also shown that children taught in schools with timber structures may perform better than in those made of concrete.

                    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0408102359.htm

                    On another thread we've talked about anti-burn coatings for new construction. Maybe some fire resistance could be built right into the composition glue.
                    Last edited by KC; 09-04-2016, 12:17 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kcantor View Post
                      Originally posted by ThomasH View Post
                      No thanks, that building could light up and burn down in 15 minutes. No one in such a building would survive.
                      you do know these are heavy timber and composite timber structures that are not stick framed with 2 x 4's?

                      heavy timbers actually perform better in a fire than structural steel because they don't burn and they don't lose their structural integrity in a fire The outer 3/4 inch will char which then insulates and deprives the fire of new material to burn. the interior doesn't lose its structural integrity the way steel does Shen exposed to heat

                      timber also captures co2 and is considerably less energy intensive to manufacture than either steel or concrete.
                      I'm still not convinced, I will believe it when I see an actual wooden building withstand a fire. Would such a building withstand a terrorist attack by bomb or plane?
                      Edmonton first, everything else second.

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                      • #12
                        ^well I don't see other towers withstanding jets flying into them, so why would you expect the wood structure to be able to do it any better? Definitely possible. I think it's really very cool overall. I would love to see more and learn more about it. Definitely interests me.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ThomasH View Post
                          Originally posted by kcantor View Post
                          Originally posted by ThomasH View Post
                          No thanks, that building could light up and burn down in 15 minutes. No one in such a building would survive.
                          you do know these are heavy timber and composite timber structures that are not stick framed with 2 x 4's?

                          heavy timbers actually perform better in a fire than structural steel because they don't burn and they don't lose their structural integrity in a fire The outer 3/4 inch will char which then insulates and deprives the fire of new material to burn. the interior doesn't lose its structural integrity the way steel does Shen exposed to heat

                          timber also captures co2 and is considerably less energy intensive to manufacture than either steel or concrete.
                          I'm still not convinced, I will believe it when I see an actual wooden building withstand a fire. Would such a building withstand a terrorist attack by bomb or plane?
                          i suppose the easy facetious answer would be "probably better than the structural steel world trade centres".

                          there are lots of examples of heavy timber construction in the 4 - 8 storey range that have survived fires without incurring structural failure.

                          if you really want to explore some of the characteristics of different materials during fire exposure including concrete and steel as well as timber, this is s good primer site:

                          http://www.mace.manchester.ac.uk/pro...er/default.htm
                          "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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                          • #14
                            Alright Ken, lets say this building was built and was hit by a large fire. The building survived the fire but the strength and elasticity of the wooden structure has been reduced. Would such a tall building still be able to withstand high winds? What about an earthquake? Lets say it still can; would the value of the building remain the same or be reduced after renovations? Would anyone still want to live in such a building?
                            Edmonton first, everything else second.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ThomasH View Post
                              Alright Ken, lets say this building was built and was hit by a large fire. The building survived the fire but the strength and elasticity of the wooden structure has been reduced. Would such a tall building still be able to withstand high winds? What about an earthquake? Lets say it still can; would the value of the building remain the same or be reduced after renovations? Would anyone still want to live in such a building?
                              the answer to your questions regarding wood structures are exactly the same as the answers to the very same questions if asked of steel structures.
                              "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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