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Streets for People: Edmonton Walkability Symposium - April 27, 28, 2016

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  • Streets for People: Edmonton Walkability Symposium - April 27, 28, 2016



    The City of Edmonton, the Alberta Professional Planners Institute (APPI), and the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) are hosting an evening event on Wednesday, April 27th and a full day symposium on Thursday, April 28th with Jeff Speck, author of Walkable City and one of the world’s leading thinkers on smart growth and urban design.:cheers:

    Streets for People: Why Creating a People-friendly Downtown is Important

    When: Wednesday, April 27th from 6pm – 8pm (Partner Fair to begin at 5:30pm)

    Where: City Room, City Hall
    Join us for an evening with Jeff as he talks about why a walkable downtown is important, followed by a Q&A period.
    General admission – FREE


    Streets for People: Edmonton Walkability Symposium

    When: Thursday, April 28th from 8am – 6pm

    Where: Sutton Place Hotel (10235 – 101 Street)
    About the event:
    Jeff Speck is one of the world’s leading thinkers on smart growth and urban design. Join him and other presenters for a one-day symposium that will provide practical and inspiring steps to help build a more people-friendly, multi-modal city. All passionate city builders are welcome.


    Tickets and more info here:

    http://www.eventbrite.ca/e/for-peopl...=eventurl_text


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

  • #2
    There is still time to sign up for the Streets for People Walkability Symposium on April 28.
    Can't make the symposium? Then stop by the free, public presentation on April 27 by Jeff Speck. He'll be speaking on "The Importance of a Walkable Downtown". The event begins at 5:30 p.m. at City Hall, in the City Room.


    Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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    • #3
      Wayfinding

      What makes a street enjoyable? A street you want to go to? A street that feels safe?

      It’s the people.

      But how do you encourage more people walk Downtown?

      First off, it’s realizing just how walkable Downtown Edmonton really is. Most major sites and amenities are within a five to ten minute walk of one another. You can spend more time looping the block to find a close parking space than it takes to park a block further away and walk to your destination.

      Helping you find your way

      When you come out of an LRT station or out of parkade, finding your way can be difficult amongst the tall buildings.

      Coming this fall, the City will be installing street-level map based signage in the busiest areas of the Downtown core to help people locate where they are, and how to get to their destination. In 2014, we tested placing signs in various locations Downtown and people found them to be very helpful.

      The maps will show where you are in relation to major landmarks, buildings and LRT stations. You’ll also be able to gauge how long it will take to walk to your destination.

      A variety of interim signage options will be used, that will be easy to move around as different construction projects start and finish. They will also be updated regularly as our Downtown changes.

      Once areas under construction are completed, the City will install permanent signage in the core and throughout the rest of Downtown.

      This work is part of a larger project called Pedestrian Wayfinding, which is setting the standard for pedestrian-focused wayfinding maps, apps and signage for our busy pedestrian areas and paths featuring multiple transportation modes.

      By creating standards for how signage and maps are designed, we can better ensure that consistent map references, icons and language are used. It also helps ensure that signs are updated frequently and maintained by the City and its partners.

      Part of the Pedestrian Wayfinding project also involves developing a new plan for signage and mapping in our pedway system to help people navigate the complex network between public and private buildings, LRT stations and parkades that is not always easy to navigate.

      Building streets you want to walk on

      Making a pedestrian-friendly street is a combination of many things. Wide sidewalks and lighting make it comfortable. Benches, trees, and art make it interesting. Attractive stores and restaurants facing the street, with patios, active frontages and destinations like parks, make it exciting.

      The City has several programs to make this happen. The Green and Walkable project, funded by the Downtown Community Revitalization Levy, will bring infrastructure improvements to sidewalks, lighting and street furniture. The Façade Improvement Program helps businesses update their storefronts to be more attractive. And this spring, we break ground on Alex Decoteau Park, which is turning a gravel parking lot into a lush green space.


      https://transformingedmonton.ca


      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

      Comment


      • #4
        Reminder


        Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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        • #5
          Is the thread title a sort of fancy play on the term "street people"? More benches and similar will certainly help all sorts of people on the streets out. I know the bench next door to my condo is pretty much 24/7, in summer, much used, by street people (makes for some interesting conversation when my dog does her business there).
          Last edited by moahunter; 25-04-2016, 12:05 PM.

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          • #6
            ^Huh? Is that supposed to be funny?
            www.decl.org

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            • #7
              ^its more a reference to this, benches can make streets more interesting, but not always in the way everyone hopes they will be interesting:

              Making a pedestrian-friendly street is a combination of many things. Wide sidewalks and lighting make it comfortable. Benches, trees, and art make it interesting. Attractive stores and restaurants facing the street, with patios, active frontages and destinations like parks, make it exciting.
              I guess its a pet beef, I like the focus on walkability, but there also needs to be a focus on security / thinking how the cities infrastructure will be used. Art and trees, and restaurants, and controlled seating is all good. Uncontrolled seating, I'm not so sure about in the core.
              Last edited by moahunter; 26-04-2016, 12:53 PM.

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              • #8
                Most benches are NOT colonized by homeless people, especially along the street. Design based on unsubstantiated fears has done significant damage to cities including edmonton. As much as some among us like to afraid of scruffy youth, a plaza with skateboarders using the furniture and landscape is a safer place than a plaza used by no one at all.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by highlander View Post
                  Design based on unsubstantiated fears has done significant damage to cities including edmonton.
                  Unsubstantiated? I wasn't concerned about this issue before I came to Canada, because I hadn't seen it before coming to Canada (re the homeless, there was vandalism where I grew up, and street kids). As I mentioned, the seat by condo is "colonized" 24/7 in summer, you can close your eyes, or do a COE and only put wealthy middle class people on renderings, but the city IMO has to design with everyone in mind, hopefully that was discussed in the Symposium. Need busy places, with lots of concentrated people. Need to find ways to provide spaces that maybe aren't as visible for people who will use those spaces in different ways.

                  Its like the Louise McKinney park vandalizim of a few years ago shortly after spending a lot of money on a Chinese garden and similar. Who was more stupid, the city who didn't give in to "unsubstantiated fears" when they designed it, or the vandals who did the damage? I think they were equally accountable, its nice to imagine the world is just full of nice people, but its not, it doesn't mean you can't improve the city and make great things, but you need to do it smartly and securely.
                  Last edited by moahunter; 26-04-2016, 01:16 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Walkability is WAY more than about benches.
                    www.decl.org

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                    • #11
                      ^True. There have been some articles recently how some cities are using Strava to get details on where people are actually riding / running. No need for the city to make Apps or maps perhaps, or even do research, when third party providers are doing it for free.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Data is going to be a huge part of how we plan cities in the future.
                        www.decl.org

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                        • #13
                          The three things I took away from this morning.

                          1. Honking helps

                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBwaxejP76g

                          2. Lane diet time for this city.

                          3. http://www.arttouryeg.ca


                          Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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                          • #14
                            You can check out his public presentation from last night at Ted Talks.

                            https://www.ted.com/talks/jeff_speck...ty?language=en

                            He also has a short Tedx talk.

                            Also, some of the presentation from this morning, which was more Edmonton focused, can be found on Twitter at #yegwalks.
                            www.decl.org

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A good addition to the talks the City put on before, but it always brings me down to hear and always to read/see so many easy-fix examples that we could introduce in Edmonton - especially our mature neighbourhoods.
                              Live and love... your neighbourhood.

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