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Urbanism, city form and function

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  • New stone roadway anyone?

    "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

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    • Gorilla Furniture!!




      "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

      Comment


      • Here is a neat article I found.... I don’t know if any of you are Disney nuts....

        https://uxdesign.cc/3-placemaking-le...m-4263deb29b2f


        3 Placemaking Lessons From the Magic Kingdom

        UX designers need to know about placemaking, and Disneyland is a great example to learn from



        Why Disneyland?

        To start with, as a designed place, Disneyland is unarguably successful. Since its opening in 1955, it has received over 650 million visitors and has become a cultural touchstone. (And it’s not even most popular of Disney’s “castle” parks. Disneyland is also a large-scale environment (smaller than a town, but larger than a building) that has been carefully designed and managed by a single entity — the Walt Disney Company — for over sixty years. This allows us to examine the evolution of major placemaking principles in a very crisp way over a long period of time.
        Another reason to study Disneyland is that it was designed with storytelling in mind, so it has rich semantic and narrative layers that separate it from most other built environments. As a result, it has more in common with interactive information environments than many other physical places.
        "Do you give people who already use transit a better service, or do you build it where they don't use it in the hopes they might start to use it?" Nenshi

        Comment

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