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  • Heritage Festival

    I figured for equal opportunity billing this one deserves a spot on the raves.

    Loved the festival, again, and have been going since the 70's.

    For my time this is simply the best thing ever in Edmonton, and in places I've visited.

    I would imagine that if I was a first time visitor to Edmonton and stumbled upon this magic I would take root and never leave. Its that good. Beautiful setting, ambiance, energy.

    Through the years I can't go to this without having an ear to ear smile on my face after 10 minutes exposure. This ones good for what ails ya. A nonstop pleasure. An attempt at union in a chaotic divisive world. If only every day the world could walk shoulder to shoulder..

    Did I say magic? I will never forget the years of this festival as long as I live. Favorite moments live here.

    I would recommend for all to more regularly take in the performances at the Heritage amphitheatre a wondrous facility in its own right and enjoyable always. I can't describe the perfection of the backdrop, beautiful conifers, park, river over there and the setting rays of the sun. Surprisingly few take in the performances there and I'd suspect because they don't know much about it. For anybody that likes the cultural performances aspect a must. Also a reprieve from hours on your feet. I specifically recommend the 6pm performances.

    That said some difficulties as well;

    Very long ticket lineups(half hour) and I suspect because its hard to get enough volunteers?

    Trouble with sound bleed as pavillions compete with each other like a block of young adults firing up their car sound systems..personally I see no reason to pipe music between performances at volumes so loud it competes with venues where performances are actually taking place. Theres some chronic worst offenders out there that should be addressed. At one venue the performers kept pleading with the *soundman* to turn it down as the volume was causing shrieking mic feedback. He kept on turning it up for some odd reason. Some basic training in sound operation needs to occur.

    Info tents. Spread around but all very small tents now and basically invisible with no proper signage. Judging from the map we walked right by 3 of them without recognizing what they were.

    Signage. Wanted to go to the mexico pavillion. Walked by it twice apaprently, never saw it. pavillion signs need to be higher up so that people can see beyond the crowd that blocks view.

    Finally more room between venue and their stages would allow more efficient foot traffic. Some of the layout just asks for foot traffic jams.

    Commercial vendors should not be located in the throughways. They should be out of the way in inner fields.

    But those are fine points and a salute to the fantastic organization and hardwork that goes into this.

    Til next year then.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  • #2
    ^ Thank you, what a great post (RAVE!).

    I agree with you that Heritage Days is a uniquely magical event and experience to and for Edmonton.

    And one year I am going to gather up my courage, brave the crowds (something I do not handle well) and go in person instead of experiencing it vicariously!

    Comment


    • #3
      This got buried in the Park & Ride thread, but my only gripe with the Heritage Festival was the lack of running water for washing hands. Considering that the portapotty usage and having to eat some of the food with your fingers is a grand recipe for "mudbutt", there were very few of those porta-sinks for a proper hand washing with soap.

      Other than that, this has always been a great festival, one that I always encourage out-of-town visitors to check out.
      “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

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      • #4
        Lesson in Harmony: Heritage Days Festival

        Lesson in Harmony: Heritage Days Festival

        Hicks on Six, Edmonton Sun
        Wed, August 8, 2007


        Heritage Days is always, despite whatever weather might be thrown at it, such a success.

        A friend, a very urban fellow, never misses Heritage Days. "You hear so much about the bad ethnic extremes - gang wars, illicit activities.

        "But we all know 99% of the ethnic people are honest, hard-working, proud Canadians. That's the core of good people you see at Heritage Days. It just makes you feel good."

        A new group of police from southwest division were assigned to Heritage Days.

        "They told me Heritage Days makes them feel human again," said festival director Jack Little.

        "They felt appreciated, as opposed to working nights on Whyte Avenue with abusive drunks. They call Heritage Days a 'mental holiday.' "

        Jack suggests that families have taken ownership of the Heritage Days festival. "Families see it as their festival, a place where children are welcome, where they can eat, enjoy the shows and there's no drunks."

        Heritage Days seems to have a palpable effect on ensuring Edmonton's multi-cultural harmony.

        Many of the city's newer arrivals are from Africa. What better place than Heritage Days to introduce themselves?

        African pavilions were well featured - Congo, Ghana, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, Sudan, Uganda, Zimbabwe and many smaller communities in the catch-all Afrika OYI (OYI being a cheer).

        Some 340,000 to 360,000 Edmontonians came by, shared the food, talked, and learned about the cultures of these proud new Canadians.

        It has to affect the community as a whole. And we've been doing this for 32 years!

        -30-

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        • #5
          Edmonton's Heritage

          Edmonton's Heritage

          The Edmonton Journal
          Published: August 08, 2007 2:06 am


          Thank you to all the volunteers who made the 32nd annual Servus Heritage Festival a great success. Without the volunteers there would be no festival.

          The weather Friday night and Saturday morning presented unusual challenges that were overcome. Five new pavilions added a unique and different look to the festival. This, combined with five new countries added last year, is dramatically changing the face of the festival.

          Edmonton families are marking this festival as their very own. More than 400 opportunities to view entertainment in a non-alcohol environment, along with great food, make this so. Again, thanks to all who participated.

          Jack Little, executive director, Servus Heritage Festival

          -30-

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          • #6
            Re: Heritage Festival

            Originally posted by Replacement

            I would imagine that if I was a first time visitor to Edmonton and stumbled upon this magic I would take root and never leave. Its that good. Beautiful setting, ambiance, energy.
            I feel the exact same way. You know I would love to see that sort of heritage carried over the entire year. For example, if we could see one country take centre stage with their national performances and items showcased in city hall one weekend per year. China week with dragon dances and food, South Africa week with costumes and drums, Japan week with sushi, fans and dancer...Russian week with...etc. What a great way to showcase our multiculturalism

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Edmonton's Heritage

              Originally posted by djgirl
              Edmonton's Heritage

              The Edmonton Journal
              Published: August 08, 2007 2:06 am


              Thank you to all the volunteers who made the 32nd annual Servus Heritage Festival a great success. Without the volunteers there would be no festival.

              The weather Friday night and Saturday morning presented unusual challenges that were overcome. Five new pavilions added a unique and different look to the festival. This, combined with five new countries added last year, is dramatically changing the face of the festival.

              Edmonton families are marking this festival as their very own. More than 400 opportunities to view entertainment in a non-alcohol environment, along with great food, make this so. Again, thanks to all who participated.

              Jack Little, executive director, Servus Heritage Festival

              -30-
              Really agree with the bolded parts and a huge part of the enjoyment of this festival is not having a huge contingent walking around drunk looking for trouble if you so much as bump into them or look at them. in fact theres a whole element of society that apparently needs to drink heavily at almost any function or event and I immensely enjoy them not being around.

              As drinking has seemingly taken over every sporting event, most festivals, gatherings, its nice to see a non alcohol event.

              A salute to how the heritage festival has resisted the huge money grab, alcohol sales, that ruins the enjoyment of many other events for many people.

              Although I suspect mine is still a minority opinion, its one thats undoubtedly rising.
              "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

              Comment


              • #8
                Anything different announced for this years Heritage Days saying as it's Canada's 150th Birthday. Is it going to be the same old traditional dancers that entertained people in the early nineteen hundreds and before, the same old yak on a stick at the food vendors. Or are they going to try to bring it into the 20th. Century with some food fusion, rap singers and some choreographed dancers with Justine Bieber being the Canadian contribution of our heritage.
                Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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                • #9
                  ^if that's the plan, hope Canada didn't import from England Morris dancers back then... (not sure how PRT got in this photo )

                  Last edited by moahunter; 21-06-2017, 12:58 PM.

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                  • #10


                    Looks like ol' Wiebo with suicide belts strapped to his legs.

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                    • #11
                      ^ ^^ Looks like a typical afternoon at the Heritage Festival. The Morris dancers look like they are wearing Best Buy uniforms. The guy in the pink dress could just be a stand in. I said in my last post to bring it into the 20th century when it's now the 21st. century. This festival is so dated. Do people really think that if they eat some dim sum at 3.10 p.m. they are magically being steeped in Oriental culture. The festival is old, it's an old theme, an old premise. We know we are multicultural. There are restaurants, small stores, signs all over the city. If they want the festival to be an on going success for all age groups they are going to have to kick it up a notch. What teens want to go watch some medieval dancers when they can watch Beyoncé or Lady Gaga or Drake and their fabulous back up dancers on TV, YouTube etc. The only dancers with any energy at Heritage are the native dancers and Bollywood dancers. The rest, dancing round a pole with ribbons in their hands and wearing weird hats and leather pants, not so much.
                      Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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                      • #12
                        Yeah! I mean, who wants to settle for a measly 350,000-400,000 people a year & attendance records being broken every few years? Clearly it's time for a complete revamp to destroy the intent & purpose of Heritage Days in order to turn it into a vaguely ethnic version of the K-Days midway, minus the rides!
                        Giving less of a damn than ever… Can't laugh at the ignorant if you ignore them!

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                        • #13
                          People go out of habit. Nice day, walk around the grounds, eat something they may not have everyday, take in what meagre entertainment there is. Similar to window shopping in the mall. Kicking tires but not really interested.
                          Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by noodle View Post
                            Yeah! I mean, who wants to settle for a measly 350,000-400,000 people a year & attendance records being broken every few years? Clearly it's time for a complete revamp to destroy the intent & purpose of Heritage Days in order to turn it into a vaguely ethnic version of the K-Days midway, minus the rides!



                            Good one.

                            Top_Dawg face palmed when he saw Gems necro a ten year old thread, but this is turning into pretty good reading.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wow, never noticed it was ten years old till mentioned. Just searched Heritage Festival and ran with it. Well, the thread is ten years old and the Heritage Festival is probably exactly the same as it was ten years ago (or 20,30) so it's still really a current thread.
                              Gone............................and very quickly forgotten may I add.

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