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  • The state of the Nation

    So...today's travels happened to take me through the North East "quadrant" of the city (which is actually called "North West"...but that's a different rant). Surprise, surprise! There is activity on the CN Mainline today.
    I was through the Calder area yesterday as well (Eastbound on Yellowhead) and there was an east bound train refueling; all sea cans full of Chinese crap for the WalMarts of the east no doubt.

    Today's train was different however. I'd estimate the consist at 160-180 cars; all tankers placarded as 1267. IIRC? That's propane or other liquefied gasses. Maybe I'm wrong?

    No sign of any such "emergency" train heading West to Vancouver, hauling our farmers grain to market.

    What does this say about our extant situation out here?

    VOLUMES...IMO.

    This is Fubar.

    What's to do here folks? The arseholes in Quebec are laughing at us because we're so desperate for our "petro-dollars". This while they are suddenly desperate for these products and working our federalist system to their benefit. The big loser in this situation (and the one who can least afford it) is the Western dryland farmer, who has his entire years worth of income tied up due to this same (transport related) situation.

    Understand the irony here. Quebec farmers need propane to dry their grain crop (and that's the nuts and bolts of Quebec's "propane crisis") even though the MSM talks about "crisis" in health facilities and other such "optically sensitive" matters.
    Once the Quebec farmers have it stable they'll truck it (running on pixie dust and unicorn farts, no doubt) to Montreal and put it on a boat.

    Meanwhile the guys out here will wait forever for a train to come... and for payday,
    Things in this equation need to change.
    This is wrong.

    I do not support separating from my Country.

    I do however support separating from this current mess.
    This is not the CANADA that I was born into (in 1964) and not the CANADA that I was raised to support.
    This is something else.
    It's alien; unapproachable; difficult to function in at times.
    I'm not an exclusionist with regards to immigration. Far from it.
    I have a half a dozen subs that are "new" Canadians and they help me to grow my business by virtue of their work ethic...no problem here (except for communication; in some cases).
    Hard working people. They do 12-16 hour days, making me (the Capitalist) money.

    My problem is with all of the "sponges" that keep accumulating in the GTA.
    Any immigrant that decides to come to Alberta makes a conscientious choice to participate in CANADA. The opportunities (despite all of the BS in the last 6 yrs) are too obvious to overlook.
    The differential between my Filipino partners and the refugee trash down east should be easily apparent.

    Please stop the insanity.
    I don't want another 5 million "refugees" in my country, sucking on my (appreciable number of) tax dollars over the next ten years.

    There's a "rant" for you.
    YMMV. Take it for what it's worth.

    Ron

  • #2
    "we have no compassion and we ask no compassion from you. when our turn comes, we shall not make excuses for the terror"

    sleep well ronnie
    you missed when time and life shook hands and said goodbye.

    Comment


    • #3


      ‘Canadian values’: Pembina Pipeline comes to Quebec’s rescue with propane shipments – Calgary Herald

      “ Calgary-based Pembina plans to ship propane to parts of Canada, including Quebec, in a bid to help “fellow Canadians.” The pipeline operator is preparing unit trains, made up of 105 cars, with propane sourced from western Canada, the company said in a statement late Sunday.”

      https://calgaryherald.com/commoditie...9-5a31295f0768


      Syrian Refugees Are Slowly Integrating Into Canadian Society, Report Says | HuffPost Canada

      https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/...b0820e0af63734



      Refugees Coming To Canada Want To Contribute, Toronto Job Fair Shows
      They just need some guidance when it comes to job hunting in a new place.
      11/13/2019 14:55 EST | Updated 11/13/2019 17:09 EST

      By Sima Shakeri



      “In just 2018, Canada took in 28,100 refugees, according to the U.N., and they face unique challenges when job hunting in a new country. Along with language barriers in many cases, refugees often lose their documentation and educational credentials, and don’t know the business culture that Canadian employers look for. All the while, they’re dealing with trauma from the situations that displaced them, and have to wrangle transportation, childcare and financial resources.

      “Things are done here differently. Resumes for one, are crafted differently. The language you use on paper and in interviews, you have to actually understand it’s a different way that Canadians have of understanding you, which may be very different from the country you’ve come from,” Omidvar said. “But even before you get an interview, you have to, it’s actually extremely hard to get through the door.”

      https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/...b0a794d1f9ad83
      Last edited by KC; 25-11-2019, 06:40 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        ^^^The 5 million refugees you seem to be concerned about are a figment of your imagination.

        The majority of the 300,000 new arrivals in Canada each year are selected through a points system based on their skills and education. Only a small percentage arrive as refugees.

        Far from sucking on your tax dollars, they are much more likely to be or become tomorrow's highly trained professionals and business owners that Canada will increasingly rely upon for its tax revenue and future prosperity.

        A recent study using Census data shows that children of first generation immigrants have significantly higher educational achievement than the children of Canadian born parents:

        The children of immigrants were generally more likely than their counterparts from the third generation or higher to complete postsecondary studies. For example, among children of immigrants aged 13 to 17 in 2006, 43% had earned a university degree in 2016, compared with 29% of their counterparts from the third generation or higher.

        The children of Asian immigrants were much more likely to have a high level of education. For example, in 2016, the children of immigrants from East Asia were two and a half times more likely than their counterparts from the third generation or higher to hold a university degree.
        Source: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/...019018-eng.htm

        Comment


        • #5
          It is hard to believe that people who were 13 to 17 in 2006 have children that are now old enough to have earned a university degree.

          Comment


          • #6
            Old Man Yells at clouds. Read more about it here.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SP59 View Post
              It is hard to believe that people who were 13 to 17 in 2006 have children that are now old enough to have earned a university degree.
              The children were 13 to 17 years old in 2006, not their immigrant parents. That would be clear from reading the report.

              Comment


              • #8
                I'm sure it is. It just not what the sentence in the quote says.

                Comment


                • #9


                  https://www-macleans-ca.cdn.ampproje...GEES_CHART.png

                  https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/...lement-canada/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by East McCauley View Post
                    ^^^The 5 million refugees you seem to be concerned about are a figment of your imagination.

                    The majority of the 300,000 new arrivals in Canada each year are selected through a points system based on their skills and education. Only a small percentage arrive as refugees.

                    Far from sucking on your tax dollars, they are much more likely to be or become tomorrow's highly trained professionals and business owners that Canada will increasingly rely upon for its tax revenue and future prosperity.

                    A recent study using Census data shows that children of first generation immigrants have significantly higher educational achievement than the children of Canadian born parents:

                    The children of immigrants were generally more likely than their counterparts from the third generation or higher to complete postsecondary studies. For example, among children of immigrants aged 13 to 17 in 2006, 43% had earned a university degree in 2016, compared with 29% of their counterparts from the third generation or higher.

                    The children of Asian immigrants were much more likely to have a high level of education. For example, in 2016, the children of immigrants from East Asia were two and a half times more likely than their counterparts from the third generation or higher to hold a university degree.
                    Source: https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/...019018-eng.htm
                    Hmm. That second paragraph reads somewhat like the hated, racist and divisive “you people” phrase. Is it proper to define and distinguish between Canadians by their or their parents’ country/geography of origin? It all seems like racial profiling. It does though seem like good news for those mentioned.
                    Last edited by KC; 26-11-2019, 07:28 PM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Iron View Post
                      So.....

                      I do not support separating from my Country.

                      I do however support separating from this current mess.
                      This is not the CANADA that I was born into (in 1964) and not the CANADA that I was raised to support.
                      This is something else.
                      It's alien; unapproachable; difficult to function in at times.
                      I'm not an exclusionist with regards to immigration. Far from it.
                      I have a half a dozen subs that are "new" Canadians and they help me to grow my business by virtue of their work ethic...no problem here (except for communication; in some cases).
                      Hard working people. They do 12-16 hour days, making me (the Capitalist) money.

                      My problem is with all of the "sponges" that keep accumulating in the GTA.
                      Any immigrant that decides to come to Alberta makes a conscientious choice to participate in CANADA. The opportunities (despite all of the BS in the last 6 yrs) are too obvious to overlook.
                      The differential between my Filipino partners and the refugee trash down east should be easily apparent.

                      Please stop the insanity.
                      I don't want another 5 million "refugees" in my country, sucking on my (appreciable number of) tax dollars over the next ten years.

                      There's a "rant" for you.
                      YMMV. Take it for what it's worth.

                      Ron

                      I think what has been said here must be a gross misunderstanding. I however don’t know the facts or the nuances to the issues.

                      All I can do is guess but I’d say that many refugees can be expected to lack the skills to rapidly attain employment in Canada. They are refugees not economic or other self-guided migrants. However, because they largely can’t safely continue to live in their country of origin, Canada becomes somewhat of a saviour. They are not here seeking dollars but instead seeking survival. In my view that would likely create citizens of considerable loyalty to their new country. Over time they can develop what skills are needed to be productive here. On the other hand, those people that have come for more purely economic reasons may be quick to move on in search of even greater opportunities for themselves. (Of course refugees may return to their homelands but I’m not sure if that option presents itself very often.)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KC
                        Hmm. That second paragraph reads somewhat like the hated, racist and divisive “you people” phrase. Is it proper to define and distinguish between Canadians by their or their parents’ country/geography of origin? It all seems like racial profiling. It does though seem like good news for those mentioned.


                        What the hell? Studying the differences in educational attainment between different groups, whether by region/age/sex/generation/ethnicity/immigration status is "racial profiling"? As others have said recently, you're naive devil's advocate schtick is getting really tiresome when it produces crap like this. It's only racial profiling if you take that data on groups and assume that you can apply it to individuals, you goof. It's important to study such things so that governments and other organizations can allocate resources, structure programs, and so on. Without that kind of data, government and business both end up running blind.

                        Originally posted by SP59
                        I'm sure it is. It just not what the sentence in the quote says.


                        The sentence is very clear. You're the one who made the leap to assume that 13 to 17 year olds from 2006 had their children's educational attainment studied in 2016, leading to your confusion. You linked the two sentences/bullet points together, when they're to be taken separately. Maybe the post's formatting removal of the bullet points lead to that, I don't know. But the sentence stands on it's own quite clearly.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Stereotype Accuracy: A Displeasing Truth | Psychology Today

                          https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/b...pleasing-truth



                          African visitors least likely to obtain Canadian visas

                          “ These decisions are made by highly trained officers who carefully and consistently assess each application equally against the same criteria, as laid out by Immigration, Refugees and Protection Act."...”

                          https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottaw...lers-1.5369830
                          Last edited by KC; 26-11-2019, 09:57 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I have no ******* idea of your reference point...

                            Please elaborate?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              ^^^Marcel's point above is spot on. To illustrate using a different example. From the point of effective service delivery it's important to know that the McCauley neighbourhood has one of the highest poverty rates in the city. But that doesn't mean everyone in McCauley is poor and is in need of such services.

                              My neighbour Theresa Spinelli (owner of the Italian Centre) lives in McCauley and she's not poor. Neither am I nor are many of my neighbours.

                              To get back to topic at hand, the reasons why the children of immigrants tend to have higher educational attainment than the children of third generation or more Canadians have been extensively researched. To once again briefly quote from the Statistics Canada report I cited above:

                              In general, immigrant parents have higher expectations and aspirations for their children than parents born in this country and do everything they can to pass this ambition onto them (Feliciano and Lanuza 2015). This intergenerational transmission of objectives is thought to be easier since the children of immigrants often have a stronger sense of obligation toward their family than children of non-immigrant parents (Hardway, Fuligni and Witkow 2004).Note 11

                              Furthermore, within certain immigrant communities, the fact that children do well in school and graduate from university maintains, and even increases, the family’s status and level of prestige, which could also influence the parents’ and children’s motivation (e.g., Somerville and Robinson 2016).
                              Last edited by East McCauley; 28-11-2019, 05:23 PM.

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