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Ripped off on new build townhome - inspectors? Does Edmonton have any?

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  • Ripped off on new build townhome - inspectors? Does Edmonton have any?

    my experience with a brand new townhome by Park Homes http://www.parkhomewoes.xyz

    Several large issues. Contacted city. Only response I got was they inspected the rough plumbing at some point. They stop at rough in stage and dont come back. Wonder if anything is really getting inspected. The company itself Park Homes, a division of Pemcor which is a company of 2 guys from Vancouver and San Diego seem very willing to pull any stunt and breach contract. My question is why if someone is going to scam people all over Edmonton, shouldn't they at least be from Edmonton?

    We see so much building spreading out, what will come of it? Projects of nasty caving in structures 10 years down the line that Edmonton cant afford to clean up? Spread for spreads sake with no standards wont end well thats for sure.

  • #2
    I went to your webpage but didn't see much of a story about your experience with Park Homes. I take it that it was the tile in your bathroom that had come loose. What were the large issues?

    I would expect that the city did several more inspections than just the rough in plumbing.

    Comment


    • #3
      Are you asking that COE inspect finishes in every home built?

      Comment


      • #4
        I thought this is exactly the type of liability related thread that C2E doesn't want. Pretty sure I'm not far off on that.

        Why open an account here yesterday, and start a thread here, defaming a company, when you were not even a member of this board and this is your first post here?


        Seems like you might be using the board, for no benefit of the board (only peril) and to no discerned purpose.

        Doesn't seem to me like spamming this is your best option.
        "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

        Comment


        • #5
          You haven't really stated all the problems you've been having.
          If it's a new build, its automatically covered by warranty. Contact them. It's like insurance for builders, so a claim will not look good.

          A falling tile isn't really worth the effort to put a webpage like this and expose yourself to a lawsuit, but to each their own.

          Every new build should have had the full city inspections including plumbing, electrical rough in and finals, insulation, framing, grading, occupancy, etc etc. They'll all be on file with the city.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by nobleea View Post
            You haven't really stated all the problems you've been having.
            If it's a new build, its automatically covered by warranty. Contact them. It's like insurance for builders, so a claim will not look good.

            A falling tile isn't really worth the effort to put a webpage like this and expose yourself to a lawsuit, but to each their own.

            Every new build should have had the full city inspections including plumbing, electrical rough in and finals, insulation, framing, grading, occupancy, etc etc. They'll all be on file with the city.
            Lawsuit? You can say things that are TRUE all day long. This company PARK HOMES knew of deficiencies BEFORE I took possession. Fixing them was in the contract. They made effort to appear to be fixing them then did not. Thats breach of contract and its them who broke the law. My new home then became something I had to fight about for weeks and a constant work zone.

            I find it odd people are coming here saying "a loose tile". Whats your agenda? WHo are you with? BEcause it 3 bathroom floors of loose tile. Not one tile or two tiles. Also, substrate not screwed down per requirements. A plumbing oing covered in Tuck tape with abs glue on top of Tuck Tape which was leaking. A shower arm that was not installed correctly which caused leak down thru ceiling.

            This is all going on the site for those who care to read. Look at Park HOmes past in the reviews all over the web. They dont care about "not looking good" on insurance claims. Its quite obvious but then - you have to actually read what those people wrote in the past all over the web, which I link to on the site. WHich normal people will and Park Homes damage control reps will try and downplay here.

            More people need to speak up when they are ripped off and the city needs to actually inspect and stop issuing permits to bad builders who rip people off year after year. My situation is not unique.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Replacement View Post
              I thought this is exactly the type of liability related thread that C2E doesn't want. Pretty sure I'm not far off on that.

              Why open an account here yesterday, and start a thread here, defaming a company, when you were not even a member of this board and this is your first post here?


              Seems like you might be using the board, for no benefit of the board (only peril) and to no discerned purpose.

              Doesn't seem to me like spamming this is your best option.
              I've notified Admin about the OP.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by nobleea View Post
                You haven't really stated all the problems you've been having.
                If it's a new build, its automatically covered by warranty. Contact them. It's like insurance for builders, so a claim will not look good.

                A falling tile isn't really worth the effort to put a webpage like this and expose yourself to a lawsuit, but to each their own.

                Every new build should have had the full city inspections including plumbing, electrical rough in and finals, insulation, framing, grading, occupancy, etc etc. They'll all be on file with the city.
                Warranty doesn't help if you can't get the builder to come fix it. A friend of mine had issues with cracking tiles and incorrect grading in his yard. They kept saying they were too busy to come fix it. When he threatened to take them to court they said "good luck, we have good lawyers.".

                Comment


                • #9
                  Just as an aside I can never comprehend why so many people prefer signing on for unbuilt new homes as opposed to resales that are more of a known element. Further on established homes so much of the work is already done. Landcaping, fencing, garage, deck, etc. From a cost pov alone resales is always the logical way to go.


                  Is there some phobia about living in a home others have lived in? I don't get it.

                  I could see people opting for new home purchase if they had to. With ample real estate stock on the market of better homes, neighborhoods why do they opt to live in some far off space with often poor transportation and services.
                  "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    A good resource to look at for defects and remedies can be found here.

                    All rough grades have to be surveyed by a qualified surveyor and the municipality then evaluates the report and approves it or not. If it has been approved the homebuilder isn't responsible for something that may subsequently back grade.

                    As per the Municipal Affairs Performance Guide linked to above:

                    1.12 Ground has settled around the home or along utility lines.
                    Acceptable Performance Condition:
                    Settling or subsidence of ground around the home or along utility lines is not a defect.
                    Warranty Coverage:
                    This is not a defect.
                    Claim Response:
                    None.
                    Remarks:
                    The homeowner is responsible for surface water management to ensure water does not affect the home or the neighbouring property. Any landscaping elements installed by the homeowner should not adversely affect drainage patterns established by the builder.


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DanC View Post
                      Are you asking that COE inspect finishes in every home built?
                      Not every, but if there was a percentage of randomly chosen builds that were inspected, it would help. Finding one means looking into it further and imposing large penalties or fines. This would make builders ensure quality and not cut corners.

                      Originally posted by Replacement View Post
                      Just as an aside I can never comprehend why so many people prefer signing on for unbuilt new homes as opposed to resales that are more of a known element. Further on established homes so much of the work is already done. Landcaping, fencing, garage, deck, etc. From a cost pov alone resales is always the logical way to go.


                      Is there some phobia about living in a home others have lived in? I don't get it.

                      I could see people opting for new home purchase if they had to. With ample real estate stock on the market of better homes, neighborhoods why do they opt to live in some far off space with often poor transportation and services.
                      Further away from traffic congestion, noise, and people who bought cheap old rundown homes. I used to live in Terwillegar, and thanks to the LRT, it brought some undesirable people who traveled to the area to stand on intersection medians holdings signs begging for money, walking up and down the line of cars knocking on windows at red lights. It first started at the corner of 111th st and 23 ave and started spreading to other main intersections. I guess downtown is too full, they don't get any business, so they freely take the LRT to other areas now.

                      The newer areas are better designed for the most part with regards to street layout (loops not grids) and more parks, and bike paths that aren't on a road. I'd love a late 80's or 90's home if it's in a nice neighborhood and it's been remodeled. Newer designs are open concept of kitchen/dining/family room, where the older ones mostly have separate rooms. It's nice to be in the kitchen and not apart from guests or family. Newer homes are also better insulated and already have high efficiency furnace, hot water and windows.

                      Of course BRAND new homes have problems as well, especially when built during a boom and corners are cut. I personally don't care that much as long as the neighborhood is nice and the house is open concept. My house was built in 2010 and it's fine, but if we were to move, it would be either a nice established 80'-90's neighborhood that's still in good shape with high property values, or an acreage out of town.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Replacement View Post
                        Just as an aside I can never comprehend why so many people prefer signing on for unbuilt new homes as opposed to resales that are more of a known element. Further on established homes so much of the work is already done. Landcaping, fencing, garage, deck, etc. From a cost pov alone resales is always the logical way to go.
                        Well, with a new house YOU get to pick everything. From the kitchen doors and countertops, to the wall colors and carpet. It's all done, and it's done the way you want it. That's a big appeal to a lot of people, especially people who aren't handy. When we bought our house it was structurally great, but we spent time and money making cosmetic upgrades (new tile here and there, painted walls, new carpet) before we moved in.
                        They're going to park their car over there. You're going to park your car over here. Get it?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Gord Lacey View Post
                          Originally posted by Replacement View Post
                          Just as an aside I can never comprehend why so many people prefer signing on for unbuilt new homes as opposed to resales that are more of a known element. Further on established homes so much of the work is already done. Landcaping, fencing, garage, deck, etc. From a cost pov alone resales is always the logical way to go.
                          Well, with a new house YOU get to pick everything. From the kitchen doors and countertops, to the wall colors and carpet. It's all done, and it's done the way you want it. That's a big appeal to a lot of people, especially people who aren't handy. When we bought our house it was structurally great, but we spent time and money making cosmetic upgrades (new tile here and there, painted walls, new carpet) before we moved in.

                          We viewed 50 homes at least before purchase and reviewed tons through 1-2yrs before getting what we wanted at the price we wanted. thus getting good price, good neighborhood, and nicer than the typical house at the pricepoint. We actually bought the house we liked. unlike show homes older stock offers a much wider range of tastes and styles. jmo


                          I'm handy though so don't mind reworking remodelling the things we didn't like. But we bought 30yrs ago and because we bought a well constructed home (it was fully inspected and also further inspected by us) we knew what we had, and never really wanted to move since. We bought a house we could grow into and that had presense, as well as potential.


                          I find whether it is new home buys or resales people are far too casual about what they buy and do not research nearly enough. People are oddly impulsive about one of the most important purchase decisions in their lives. home is important to me.
                          Last edited by Replacement; 05-09-2018, 03:19 PM.
                          "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Oddly impulsive! So you're saying spending $450-550k on something you looked at for 10 to 15 minutes with your realtor is impulsive? I think I've seen people spend more time looking at a dinner menu.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SP59 View Post
                              Oddly impulsive! So you're saying spending $450-550k on something you looked at for 10 to 15 minutes with your realtor is impulsive? I think I've seen people spend more time looking at a dinner menu.
                              Maybe my syntax or grammatical structuring is poor. It is. In the sentence Oddly is deadwood, redundant, and confused the intended meaning of the sentence.

                              I'm simply saying people are too impulsive, generally, with home purchases.
                              "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

                              Comment

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