Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

One of a gem - The McLeod

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Komrade
    replied
    Great building inside. My friend has a Bachelor Pad in there. Still a lot of original details it seems.

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    replied
    Some history here. Unfortunately they only provide one old interior photo. An image search on google provides lots of similar exterior photos but I’d like to see more of the old interior of our old historic buildings.

    The McLeod History - The McLeod
    https://www.themcleod.ca/the-mcleod-history/


    One old construction shot here but from a distance.

    McLeod Building - Wikipedia
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McLeod_Building
    Last edited by KC; 24-07-2018, 08:20 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Alex.L
    replied
    i wish people would stop painting over the old painted billboards on these buildings.

    just leaving them there would add so much character to downtown

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeZ
    replied
    Actually, the issue is the lack of tradesmen and the prohibitive cost to do the type of stone facade as found on the Mcleod.

    Since the leaky condo fiascos, architects once skilled in detailing and design of masonry, no longer do so, its left to building envelope engineers that have no interest in the conductive thermal breaks inherent in such design.

    Without anyone specifying it, the tradesmen dwindle to the point that hardly anyone practices the trade, and potential new comers to the industry can't find training to do it.

    Our trade schools then convert to teaching medical transcription, public realtions, and other such programs, which students of, ironically, earn less than a skilled tradesmen. The last "true" stone mason I'm aware of, before his death, commanded virtually any price he wanted to do true stonework, like chimneys in banff and jasper, elaborate pools on affluent homes, etc.

    Developers interested in rate of return, aren't interesting in projects that take years to execute, cost more and require importation of workers familiar with the trade to complete. The added costs of doing so impact the lease rate, and make them uncompetitive against their competition.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arliss
    replied
    Originally posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
    Originally posted by Arliss
    Students of architecture would understand that buildings of this type usually have a steel skeleton with a facade that can have a variety of appearances.
    uh, students of architecture would understand that buildings constructed around the turn of the century like the McLeod, Phillips and others have little or no steel in them because it wasn't a widely used building material until sometime around the World Wars.

    I'm not overly familiar with the McLeod so maybe there is a fair amount of steel in it, but I'd be surprised. Phillips on the other hand is entirely wood and masonry.

    My point was the STREETSCAPE that these buildings created, and why modern architecture cannot or will not duplicate it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marcel Petrin
    replied
    Originally posted by Arliss
    Students of architecture would understand that buildings of this type usually have a steel skeleton with a facade that can have a variety of appearances.
    uh, students of architecture would understand that buildings constructed around the turn of the century like the McLeod, Phillips and others have little or no steel in them because it wasn't a widely used building material until sometime around the World Wars.

    I'm not overly familiar with the McLeod so maybe there is a fair amount of steel in it, but I'd be surprised. Phillips on the other hand is entirely wood and masonry.

    Leave a comment:


  • MylesC
    replied
    I was just in a friend's place earlier today in the Cambridge and was gazing out their windows straight at the deocration around the top of the building.

    Truly a gem in our City.

    Leave a comment:


  • hosshumard
    replied
    I used to own a place in the 7th Street Lofts and since it and the McLeod are both Gene Dub projects, the crew that was finishing up the Lofts was also working on the McLeod.

    They said that the McLoed were a horror show to renovate...lots of nasty suprises during the renos, can't imagine Gene made much money on it.

    That said, I think it's a beautiful building and was certainly worth fixing up....although I can't say I've actually ever been inside....

    Leave a comment:


  • Arliss
    replied
    Students of architecture would understand that buildings of this type usually have a steel skeleton with a facade that can have a variety of appearances. Since this building looks nice and has an attractive street presence, one has to wonder why it has not been duplicated more often, and why we have absolutely horrific junk that probably costs just as much as the nicer versions. I suspect the architecture schools are not concentrating on pleasing designs and rather on soviet-style mega-blocks. I can't imagine why.

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeZ
    replied
    Somewhat of a misleading title to this thread no? Its not "one", as the Mcleod is a slightly altered, stripped down copy of the Paulsen Building, in keeping with the frugal nature of the original owner. We Edmontonians like to copy...Mcleod, Rexall Place....etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • kcantor
    replied
    this is about as close to the original view you can currently get from google earth:

    Leave a comment:


  • Voice
    replied
    When you see that old car off to the side it really gives the date of construction some meaning. That was a long time ago. I'm sure glad it wasn't torn down like so many others. It would be great to see that old photo and a new one side by side.

    Leave a comment:


  • IanO
    started a topic One of a gem - The McLeod

    One of a gem - The McLeod

    A photo I took from a spectacular book of Edmonton in 1914.

Working...
X