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Edmonton's Energy Transition Strategy

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  • #16
    ^ Not really. The net CO2 emissions from agriculture are a result of fossil fuel combustion. For plants, this includes production and distribution of agrochemicals, planting and harvesting, and processing and transportation of crops. Processing and transportation inputs also apply to meat production, but the big problem with raising animals for food is that they need to be fed many times more calories than can be harvested as meat, so the primary inputs for growing their feed are multiplied. The cost penalty of a broadly based carbon tax will thus be multiplied as well, which should increase the cost of meat relative to plant-based foods and encourage consumers to adjust their diets accordingly.

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    • #17
      Update

      http://sirepub.edmonton.ca/sirepub/c...6014710226.PDF


      Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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      • #18
        Edmonton to become first Canadian city to lead 'big' energy program
        June 2, 2017
        Media are invited to join Councillor Scott McKeen, Percy Woods, CEO of BOMA Edmonton and Sidney Waskiewich, Senior Director at Qualico Commercial as they launch a new City program aimed at helping large buildings reduce their energy use.

        Date: Monday, June 5, 2017
        Time: 10 a.m.
        Location: EPCOR Tower, 10423 - 101 St, Edmonton (NE side of lobby)

        Councillor McKeen and other speakers will be available for interviews and questions.


        Media contact:
        Becky Machnee
        Communications Advisor
        City of Edmonton
        780-944-0420


        Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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        • #19
          The rebirth of District Energy?

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          • #20
            It is coming... Enmax driven.


            Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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            • #21
              Edmonton becomes first city in Canada to lead big building energy program

              June 5, 2017
              The City is launching a voluntary Large Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure program (LBERD) aimed at transforming Edmonton’s large buildings. This is the first municipally-led program of its kind in Canada. It will provide building owners with valuable information about their building energy performance and help them take advantage of Energy Efficiency Alberta programs and incentives for upgrades to heating, cooling and lighting systems. Energy efficient buildings are critical to achieving Edmonton’s energy efficiency and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets.

              “People don’t realize that buildings contribute 39 per cent of Edmonton’s GHG emissions and 42 per cent of our energy consumption. A 10 per cent reduction in energy use of just one large building would be equivalent to taking 22 cars off the road for one year,” says Lisa Dockman, Senior Project Manager for the Energy Transition Strategy. “The Government of Canada’s Pan Canadian Framework for Clean Growth and Climate Change indicates that labelling of building energy use will be regulated nationwide as early as 2019. This program will help Edmonton’s building owners prepare for future regulation and take advantage of existing government incentives.”

              “High-performing green buildings and excellence in energy performance are top of mind for most building owners and operators,” says Percy Woods, CEO of BOMA Edmonton. “Many large building owners and managers already engage in building energy reporting and benchmarking as part of their BOMA BEST certification. Our programs together will help the City reach more buildings and its environmental targets.”

              As part of its own leadership in GHG reductions, the City is committing to have 20 City-owned buildings, including City Hall, participate in the program in the first year. Large building owners and property managers can learn more and sign up for LBERD by visiting edmonton.ca/energybenchmarking. The Large Building Energy Reporting and Disclosure program is one of the many actions that the City is taking to implement the Energy Transition Strategy which moves Edmonton towards the goal of being an energy sustainable city.


              For more information:

              edmonton.ca/energybenchmarking

              Media contact:

              Becky Machnee
              Communications Advisor
              City of Edmonton
              780-944-0420


              Ottawa-Edmonton-Vancouver-Edmonton

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              • #22
                while i wish them luck, as with many things the devil will be in the details and the execution...

                it needs to be much more in-depth than simply dollars and/or consumption per building or even per square foot per building if there is going to be value for the private sector that they can benchmark.

                if the numbers are going to have any relevance, you need to know how they are measured, i.e. you need to know:

                which boma standard is being used;
                whether total gross building areas are available;
                whether parkades are included or not;
                whether lobby areas are included or not;
                whether there are any after hours uses (i.e. retail or call centres);
                whether there are any high consumption uses occupying portions of the building (i.e. computer centres or data farms); etc.

                without knowing all of these things and others (such as occupancy levels in the building during the reporting period), then it will be a nice pr gesture but the data won't be transparent enough for the benchmarks to have any real world meaning or applicability. looking at the consumption numbers for century place vs chancery hall as an example would have little value without the details. and it's nice to know city hall will be included in the program but i'm not sure that city hall will ever be able to serve as comparable for many other buildings.
                "If you did not want much, there was plenty." Harper Lee

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