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  • #16
    I didn't have much first-hand experience with a computer until windows 95 came out when I was in high school. But I remember my Dad working at one of the province's data centres in the Neil Crawford building in the early 90s. A huge cooled room with row after row of server racks. It was one of largest government data centres at the time (around 400gb) and cost a couple million to build. I wondered if they even imaged that 25 years later you'd be able to put the whole thing on a $50 portable usb drive that fits in your hand.

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    • #17
      My old boss put the power cables in the old City Hall for the first voting computer. He always said that the xxxxing cables were huge.
      Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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      • #18
        While not really that old compared to some stuff, one of our guys at work found a computer running Windows NT 4 the other day. It was still being used as a regular workstation, and did not have a specific purpose, was just never replaced.

        The other thing that stands out was our first CD-Rom drive. I think it ran off the soundcard, as it all came in a bundle. But the thing I remember the most, was the size of the box it came in. The box was about 3 feet long, 2 feet tall, and about a foot deep. The box was mostly foam for packing. Was just massive. Now IF you buy an optical drive, you're lucky if you get a box.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by lobbdogg View Post
          While not really that old compared to some stuff, one of our guys at work found a computer running Windows NT 4 the other day. It was still being used as a regular workstation, and did not have a specific purpose, was just never replaced.

          The other thing that stands out was our first CD-Rom drive. I think it ran off the soundcard, as it all came in a bundle. But the thing I remember the most, was the size of the box it came in. The box was about 3 feet long, 2 feet tall, and about a foot deep. The box was mostly foam for packing. Was just massive. Now IF you buy an optical drive, you're lucky if you get a box.
          haha, yeah, I remember my parents had to upgrade our 386DX with a "multimedia pack" or whatever that had a soundcard and CD-ROM drive so I could play SimCity 2000 way back in the day. I don't remember exactly how much it cost, but it was probably close to or around a thousand bucks.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Edmonton PRT View Post
            ... He always said that the xxxxing cables were huge.
            For a minute I didn't realize you were self-censoring, I was thinking huge xxx cables yup people still need extra bandwidth to handle all the porn they were surfing.

            I was told "washing machine" hard drives typically left the bottom and top sides of the platters empty because they were most likely to be exposed to dust, only the middle sides of the platters were used.

            PS: IBM used to use "Arizona Road Dust" during their testing phases for earlier hard drives. And one company was sending back Memorex disk packs because they were dinged up, only to find out their employees were playing hockey with them as the pucks and brooms for sticks.

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            • #21
              In my large edmonton high school I jumped ahead of my grade level to take computing 30. I think there were only eight students in the class! All Chess Club types.
              I still have a stack of punchcards laying around somewhere...


              Later we had one of these at home... Used CPM2.2 (it was an early 'mobile' computer.)





              Some years later I was able to use Javelin Plus software. Used Lotus 123 daily but Javelin for big jobs. Multi-dimension views of data, pivot table like views, etc. Too bad it failed, it crashed the hardware of the day. Lotus IMPROV was sort of a knockoff that appeared later. Quantrix is about the only thing like it available today. I still don't care much for Excel in comparison to the now long gone Javelin.

              Watch the 10 minute mark:
              https://archive.org/details/Business1985

              "Products/Demos: Wordstar 2000, WordPerfect 4.1, Lotus 123, Javelin, ParadoxPC File/R
              This movie is part of the collection: Computer Chronicles"

              On Javelin:
              "Then there was the year Microsoft's new Windows spreadsheet, Excel, was up against start-up Javelin Software's Javelin spreadsheet for InfoWorld Product of the Year. Although Excel was a beautiful extension of the existing spreadsheet concept, Javelin had imaginative features, says Michael McCarthy, InfoWorld reviews editor from 1984 to 1990 and current publisher of IDG's San Francisco-based Web Publishing Inc., producers of JavaWorld and SunWorld. "I persuaded InfoWorld to give Javelin Product of the Year," McCarthy says. "At the InfoWorld dinner at Comdex, when they gave out the award for Product of the Year and Excel came in second, Bill Gates got up and stomped out of the room in front of everybody in a spectacularly rude manner." "Backstage: InfoWorld's movers and shakers By Scott Mace http://archive.infoworld.com/pageone...ackstage.shtml

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Javelin_Software

              .
              Last edited by KC; 12-03-2014, 10:42 AM.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by AShetsen View Post
                I learned programming around 1983 on the IBM or Amdahl mainframe at the U of A that ran something called the Michigan Terminal System.

                (The first shot is the terminals. The second shot is of hardware that I never got to see, but I do remember the set of operating manuals in each terminal room in the old General Services Building and Assiniboia Hall -- that's the volume above -- I think it may have been actually the thickest single book in the world.)


                http://terminals.classiccmp.org/wiki...n_AJ_510-1.jpg



                (http://www.eecis.udel.edu/~mills/gallery/pic/ibm67d.jpg)
                We may have been in the same classes. Did you take FORTRAN 77 or APL? All I remember from my stint in the computing science program was walking to another building to pick up hard copies of my runs and then seeing yellow everything as I drove home at 2am.
                Last edited by KC; 12-03-2014, 10:24 AM.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by EveB View Post
                  When I started my word processing service (after several years of using typewriters), I got me a Kaypro II which I used until it cratered. After that, to keep me working, the professors I was working for gave me their accounts so I could work in the computer rooms. I was doing math typesetting using LaTeX on terminals similar to the previous post and batching them into the processing room so that I could get dot matrix feeds in my box.

                  Eve
                  Eve, is any of what you posted in English?
                  j/k
                  He who posteth too much, should moveth out of his parents basement and get a life.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by bpeters View Post
                    Originally posted by EveB View Post
                    When I started my word processing service (after several years of using typewriters), I got me a Kaypro II which I used until it cratered. After that, to keep me working, the professors I was working for gave me their accounts so I could work in the computer rooms. I was doing math typesetting using LaTeX on terminals similar to the previous post and batching them into the processing room so that I could get dot matrix feeds in my box.

                    Eve
                    Eve, is any of what you posted in English?
                    j/k
                    English is banned from this thread. Acronyms and tech speak only - batch style preferred.

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                    • #25
                      01010101000101010101010100001001011011110
                      00010111010100100110010011001010001010010
                      01110111010101001010011001100101001100111
                      Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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                      • #26
                        Shift right double logical
                        Did my dog just fall into a pothole???

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by KC View Post
                          We may have been in the same classes. Did you take FORTRAN 77 or APL? All I remember from my stint in the computing science program was walking to another building to pick up hard copies of my runs and then seeing yellow everything as I drove home at 2am.
                          Fortran.

                          $run *watfiv scards=assig1.for sprint=*print*

                          with the data in the same input file at the end, separated by some job-control gobbledegook (all I remember is the // at the start of the lines).

                          Submitted every other Saturday at midnight online, then a walk through the snow past the old SUB in its unmodified international-style, with CJSR playing weird, weird music...
                          Last edited by AShetsen; 12-03-2014, 09:34 PM.

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                          • #28
                            Almost forget. - Big honkin daisy wheel printers and 11" x 17 city bock long paper (I striated sheet per box). With tear off perf'd side strips.

                            Then $7,000 apple laser printers for the home office...

                            Then cheap but impossible to read dot matrix printers.

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                            • #29
                              And Space Age Font

                              See Pressure Differential. And Protein Store

                              http://catacombs.space1999.net/main/cguide/umsign.html

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                              • #30
                                And who could forget the "good old days" when passwords were - easy to remember...

                                Launch code for US nuclear weapons was as easy as 00000000
                                Excerpt:

                                "For nearly 20 years, the secret code to authorize launching U.S. nuclear missiles, and starting World War III, was terrifyingly simple and even noted down on a checklist.

                                From 1962, when John F Kennedy instituted PAL encoding on nuclear weapons, until 1977, the combination to fire the devastating missiles at the height of the Cold War was just 00000000.

                                This was chosen by Strategic Air Command in an effort to make the weapons as quick and as easy to launch as possible,..."

                                http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-00000000.html

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