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Scanning old family photos, negatives, film?

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  • KC
    replied
    Totally agree with what he says at the end.

    Unlocking secrets from old camera film
    30 AUGUST 2019|PHOTOGRAPHY

    The Rescued Film Project aims to develop all the world's unprocessed camera film.
    https://www.bbc.com/reel/video/p07lg...en-photographs

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    replied
    GOOGLE'S PHOTOSCAN APP IS A NIGHTMARE FOR YOUR OLD PHOTOS. HERE'S WHY.
    July 17, 2018 Alison Taylor

    https://www.picturesandstories.com/news/





    Seven Deadly Sins of Digitizing Photos - Live (Sort of) from RootsTech — Pictures and Stories

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=...&v=_a8RYfA6B7E

    https://www.picturesandstories.com/n...from-rootstech
    Last edited by KC; 27-01-2019, 06:49 PM.

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  • Marcel Petrin
    replied
    If you're fine with terrible quality, I guess.

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  • moahunter
    replied
    Facebook is the ultimate photo archive.

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    replied
    Originally posted by Drumbones View Post
    Shoeboxes are very handy
    Online sharing with relatives is also handy. Most of the photos of my departed family are held by other relatives, and I have photos of their departed family members.


    Super 8 home movies can be super important, archivists say

    Saskatoon film lovers encourage people to preserve their old films
    By Kim Garrity, CBC News Posted: Oct 17, 2014


    "If you have memories stored on eight-millimetre or Super 8 (two popular home movie formats) archivists and film lovers in Saskatoon want you protect and preserve your film stock.

    "They're original historical documents," says Cheryl Avery, an archivist at the University of Saskatchewan. "You see the everyday [and] they're candid, so when you're looking even at a street scene or a parade ... it tells you something quite a bit about how we were living then as a community." ..."


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...-say-1.2803443

    Tips on Archiving Family History, Part 2
    JUNE 5, 2013


    "A. Stacie, the problem with JPEGs is that the codec, the program that is used to encode the digital stream of data, systematically discards some data to compress the file. This is known as lossy compression. A large amount of image information is actually discarded from the original TIFF in order to produce a smaller image file for sharing and Web viewing. This information can never be regained once it is lost. If your goal is to have digital files that can serve as long-term surrogates for the original photographs, then the TIFFs are extremely important to keep. You’ll also find that if you have the desire to print anything from the JPEGs, it will be difficult to produce a large, high-quality print."


    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/05/bo...otos.html?_r=0
    Last edited by KC; 29-04-2015, 11:15 PM.

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  • Drumbones
    replied
    Shoeboxes are very handy

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  • Kitlope
    replied
    There's also Jeet Video on the southside. I've got a few old 8mm tapes I need digitized and I've looked into getting them done here.

    http://www.jeetvideo.ca/

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    replied
    Interesting...

    Third of adults admit keeping their most valuable papers in a shoebox | Daily Mail Online

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ments-box.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Legacy
    replied
    I have an Epson V700 that has slide snap-ins.. did a pretty decent job with all the slides my Dad gave me to scan.

    Leave a comment:


  • edmontonenthusiast
    replied
    Honestly, for anything standard, aka 35mm or 120 (like if a relative had an old Brownie, that would probably be using 120 film), it's probably best to do yourself. Not sure about the Canon scanners, but the Epson and Plustek ones are great, and if you can snag a Nikon Coolscan, you'll probably be very pleased as well. It's relatively low maintenance, you can do other things while the negs are being scanned.

    But if you don't want to tackle it yourself, or you have some odd film sizes, like it seems you do, Don's or McBain would probably be your best bet. I know a while back Black's had a deal for scanning old negatives, but that might have just been for 35mm film. And 24karat is right, no matter what, it's going to cost you to get someone else to do it.

    Originally posted by 24karat View Post
    No matter who you call, it's going to cost you, when you figure how many hors a technician will have to spend on the project. Scanning slides and negatives is time-consuming, as every bit of dust must be removed, otherwise the dust gets scanned too. I have the same scanner as you do, and it does a great job.

    If you don't want to do it yourself, I'd suggest McBain Camera.
    Digital ICE can alleviate this somewhat. But yeah, dust can be a real PITA.

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    replied
    I'll have to check with them to see if they can handle the variety of formats. Anyone else?

    The scanner... Yeah, it was my second choice to an Epson V700/750, but normally hundreds of dollars less and then I saved more when I got the CanoScan on sale!

    As for the cost of scanning, I can only see the cost going up as fewer and fewer people do it. And the longer they stay in boxes, the less information I can gain on them from surviving relatives. Pay up, digitize, distribute to relatives and family history (and other history) isn't lost forever.

    I.e. On one batch of old negatives I see ships, planes, horses and carts, train wrecks, a steam tractor, a logging operation, military people, workers, the legislature with little trees around it, log buildings, and loads of people, possible relatives I've never seen pics of before. It's cool - like a treasure hunt.
    Last edited by KC; 29-03-2013, 07:39 PM.

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  • 24karat
    replied
    No matter who you call, it's going to cost you, when you figure how many hors a technician will have to spend on the project. Scanning slides and negatives is time-consuming, as every bit of dust must be removed, otherwise the dust gets scanned too. I have the same scanner as you do, and it does a great job.

    If you don't want to do it yourself, I'd suggest McBain Camera.

    Leave a comment:


  • KC
    started a topic Scanning old family photos, negatives, film?

    Scanning old family photos, negatives, film?

    Can anyone recommend a high quality local shop to get some of our old family photos, negatives, slides and super-8 and older film converted to digital? The slides, negatives and photos are of several different sizes.

    Self-scanning? I have a CanoScan 9000F but getting decent quality out of just the few little old photos I tried was a real challenge so I think I'll just use it on the newer snapshots (1960s on.)

    Plus I have a bunch of old negatives 70x120-150 mm in a James Ramsey Limited developer envelope from here in Edmonton.
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