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  • #61
    Originally posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
    To the original post, discrimination is OK when it's relevant.

    For lowering the voting age I have some reservations. Are we also going to lower the eligibility age for holding office? Does it make sense for people who can not hold office to vote for those who will hold office. I will acknowledge the age of 18 is arbitrary I think if we were to lower it for voting it would be worth considering lowering the age of majority in general.
    One option, lower it but give them 1/2 a vote.
    1/8 a vote if a Bieber fan.

    Top 10 Subtler Forms of Discrimination
    http://listverse.com/2011/09/24/top-...iscrimination/


    ~
    Last edited by KC; 25-09-2014, 06:45 PM.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by KC View Post
      Originally posted by Paul Turnbull View Post
      To the original post, discrimination is OK when it's relevant.

      For lowering the voting age I have some reservations. Are we also going to lower the eligibility age for holding office? Does it make sense for people who can not hold office to vote for those who will hold office. I will acknowledge the age of 18 is arbitrary I think if we were to lower it for voting it would be worth considering lowering the age of majority in general.

      One option, lower it but give them 1/2 a vote.
      1/8 a vote if a Bieber fan.

      Top 10 Subtler Forms of Discrimination
      http://listverse.com/2011/09/24/top-...iscrimination/


      ~
      I got a kick out of hearing this...


      Democracy Hacks: Should children have a vote?
      Wednesday, December 10, 2014

      Excerpt:
      "He points to historic restrictions on voting that allowed only men, and in some cases only men who owned property, to cast a ballot. He says allowing children a say in the political process could be seen as the next evolution of our electoral system.

      How would it work?..."

      http://www.cbc.ca/the180/excerpts/20...n-get-to-vote/




      Below the "Three-Fifths Compromise" was applied to slaves - an abhorrent measure also referred to as: "three fifths a man". By allowing children a fraction vote as I've toyed with, you'd have a three-fifths a full citizen issue. If applied without bias beyond age, and as a transitional rating, this might be acceptable though still discriminatory towards the "under-aged".

      Three-Fifths Compromise
      excerpt:
      "The debate was over if, and if so, how, slaves would be counted when determining a state's total population for legislative representation and taxing purposes. The issue was important, as this population number would then be used to determine the number of seats that the state would have in the United States House of Representatives for the next ten years, and to determine what percentage of the nation's direct tax burden the state would have to bear. The compromise was proposed by delegates James Wilson and Roger Sherman."

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three-Fifths_Compromise
      Last edited by KC; 23-12-2014, 10:22 PM.

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      • #63
        At about the 7 minute mark. The problem with underage voting...

        Comedy...

        Kevin Bridges on Scottish Independence

        https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=bRIQL4lvIqU

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        • #64
          With so much bitter truth splashing around the forum recently, heated debates and whatnot, here is a bit of entertaining read for this afternoon to cool off.

          Hiring Hot Nannies:

          But, we're delighted to report, there are definitely those who very much do want a hot nanny. Julie Swales tells of the unnamed but 'definitely A-list' Hollywood family who ask nannies to interview in bikinis - because they don't want the paparazzi to be able to distinguish between staff and family when they are on the beach. And it happens in the UK too: 'We'll often get photographs of the family, with their brief of wanting someone who'll fit in - and they're all gorgeous! They actually want someone good-looking,' explains Louise Taylor of Kensington Nannies. Although one mother said her nanny agency was very stern when she asked 'them to send me photos because I only wanted pretty ones. They said obviously they could not as it was not appropriate and that I was the first ever to ask this, as most wives insisted on unpretty nannies.' While an actress laughingly remarks that 'it's safer to get someone so hot that she's out of my husband's league', a Goldman Sachs wife explains: 'My nanny does the school run, and attends all the parent-teacher stuff that I can't - she's a face for our family, and I need her to be beautifully presented.'
          Source

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          • #65
            Originally posted by FamilyMan View Post
            With so much bitter truth splashing around the forum recently, heated debates and whatnot, here is a bit of entertaining read for this afternoon to cool off.

            Hiring Hot Nannies:

            But, we're delighted to report, there are definitely those who very much do want a hot nanny. Julie Swales tells of the unnamed but 'definitely A-list' Hollywood family who ask nannies to interview in bikinis - because they don't want the paparazzi to be able to distinguish between staff and family when they are on the beach. And it happens in the UK too: 'We'll often get photographs of the family, with their brief of wanting someone who'll fit in - and they're all gorgeous! They actually want someone good-looking,' explains Louise Taylor of Kensington Nannies. Although one mother said her nanny agency was very stern when she asked 'them to send me photos because I only wanted pretty ones. They said obviously they could not as it was not appropriate and that I was the first ever to ask this, as most wives insisted on unpretty nannies.' While an actress laughingly remarks that 'it's safer to get someone so hot that she's out of my husband's league', a Goldman Sachs wife explains: 'My nanny does the school run, and attends all the parent-teacher stuff that I can't - she's a face for our family, and I need her to be beautifully presented.'
            Source
            Rare as it is, once in a while parents ask for a nanny that will be good for the kids.

            Comment


            • #66
              As a capitalist, I am not sure if using "discrimination" neutrality applies here. Better for him to stick to the core argument he makes against government measures.

              Business Insider, 16 Mar. 2016

              Fast-food CEO says he's investing in machines because the government is making it difficult to afford employees

              "They're always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there's never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case," says Puzder of swapping employees for machines.

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by FamilyMan View Post
                As a capitalist, I am not sure if using "discrimination" neutrality applies here. Better for him to stick to the core argument he makes against government measures.

                Business Insider, 16 Mar. 2016

                Fast-food CEO says he's investing in machines because the government is making it difficult to afford employees

                "They're always polite, they always upsell, they never take a vacation, they never show up late, there's never a slip-and-fall, or an age, sex, or race discrimination case," says Puzder of swapping employees for machines.
                Nothing new.

                My mother used to talk of the automat that Edmonton used to have downtown, probably in the 1940s or 1950s. I can't think of the name but it's an old idea with new technology.

                Comment


                • #68
                  On acceptability / tolerance of age discrimination:


                  Is Warren Buffett Still Relevant?
                  Apr 26, 2019
                  Laura RittenhouseContributor
                  Leadership Strategy


                  In our society, we categorize people on the basis of gender, race and age. The term “Ageism” was created in 1968 by Dr. Robert Butler to describe the “stereotyping of and discrimination against people because they are old.” And while bias attitudes about race and gender are common, they are also condemned by many. Not so with ageism. Just go to your local Hallmark card seller and see the birthday cards mocking older people.

                  Sure, you have seen (even bought) cards making fun of age-related frailties, and how older people can’t change their minds or are forgetful. How true are these stereotypes?





                  https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurari...till-relevant/


                  April 19, 2019:
                  https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/26/h...ly-health.html



                  Too old for your job, too young to stop working. How ageism can scuttle your retirement plans - National | Globalnews.ca

                  “It’s a phenomenon financial planners are seeing more and more: workers in their mid-50s are laid off or given a buyout package and then run up against a wall trying to find another job.
                  ...
                  https://globalnews.ca/news/5105670/a...career-advice/


                  Ageism may increase people's risk of ill-health, study finds
                  Report suggests link between age-related discrimination and conditions such as arthritis
                  Nicola Davis
                  4 Apr 2019

                  “Examples of recent discrimination included being threatened or harassed in the past year, and ever having been discriminated against by doctors or in hospital.”

                  https://www.theguardian.com/science/...th-study-finds

                  Interesting article below. Since I was a teen and then into the workforce I was always surprised at the prejudice against old people. I knew quite a few “old” people and so I knew that many of them were as or more capable or knowledgeable or skilled or something than many of the people my age.

                  Then during this time discrimination against gays, other religions, etc. became totally intolerable and unacceptable yet some of the very same people calling out racism etc were hypocritically behaving the same way towards old people.


                  Is Ageism the Last Socially Acceptable ‘Ism?’ A New Book Argues Yes | Chicago News | WTTW
                  Nicole Cardos
                  April 25, 2019

                  ...
                  “Temple Rocks makes the case for increased awareness about ageism and age discrimination in her new book, "I'm Not Done: It's Time to Talk About Ageism in the Workplace.” ...”


                  More commonly, it’s the “make them so miserable they will quit” approach, which I’ve discussed previously. This can take many forms, such as excluding an older worker from some meetings all of a sudden, giving younger workers plum assignments, better sales territories, or better technology, and making an older worker feel forced to accept a role that isn’t a good fit. If there is a pattern of such behavior, it can be interpreted as age discrimination.

                  Employers take this approach because they don’t want to fire the older worker and hope that either the older worker will solve the problem for them by quitting. Sometimes they use the “miserable job” as a place to put a worker they deem disposable. More often than not, this is an older employee. One gentleman I spoke with had this happen to him; in the back of ...

                  This type of ageism is often preceded by psychological damage and general diminishment of the person. Back to my ever-so-wise attorney friend Sue Ellen, who observed:
                  ...

                  https://news.wttw.com/2019/04/25/age...ook-argues-yes





                  Don't let anyone get away with ageism, author says | CBC News

                  ...
                  “Applewhite compared the fight against ageism with the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s, when women began comparing notes.
                  Until then, a woman who wasn't heard or hired considered these her own personal problems, when, in fact, they were collective problems that required collective action, she said.

                  "It shouldn't be OK to discriminate on the basis of age any more than on the basis of sexual orientation or the colour of your skin, or anything else about ourselves that we cannot change," she said.

                  If people are turned away from jobs because of age, then it's a political problem that also requires collective action.

                  And seniors aren't the only people who face age discrimination, Applewhite said. The young run into it as well.

                  "It could also be that someone is too young to possibly know their way around a certain task," she said. ...”

                  https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-b...nior-1.4618334
                  Last edited by KC; 28-04-2019, 09:43 AM.

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