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rat free alberta is no more and it was discovered in calgary

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  • #61
    Alberta will never been totally free from rats because there are many rats that were never discovered in isolated places.
    Edmonton Rocks Rocks Rocks

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    • #62
      No. My family are mostly farmers and acreage dwellers. From the coulees near Drumheller to dairy farmers Leduc to pigeon lake and acreage dwellers from bashaw to Hinton and no, there are no rats to be seen. Sorry to disappoint you. Some do come in but they are immediately iradicated. Try it. Phone 911 and tell them you saw a rat, there will be cops, fire dept, county guys, city guys, sheriffs and wildlife guys. It will be a Big deal and it will be gone. This isn’t why you had to leave Alberta is it jag? Lol. (joking)😵
      Last edited by Drumbones; 28-08-2018, 07:31 PM.
      Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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      • #63
        Originally posted by jagators63 View Post
        Alberta will never been totally free from rats because there are many rats that were never discovered in isolated places.
        Not that I’ve ever heard but maybe some encroachment could occur on the BC border in the mountains, but not likely on the Saskatchewan border.

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        • #64
          Another benefit:


          Rats and pigeons 'replace iconic species' - BBC News


          "We show around the world that when humans modify habitats, these unique species are consistently lost and are replaced by species that are found everywhere, such as pigeons in cities and rats in farmland," said Dr Tim Newbold, a research fellow at University College London.
          Rats, mice, sparrows and pigeons are examples of species with wide ranges that do well when natural habitats are replaced with farmland and cities, he said.
          However, the "narrow-ranged losers" include animals and plants which may have great cultural value, such as...”

          https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46440396

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          • #65
            Another benefit:


            Rats and pigeons 'replace iconic species' - BBC News


            "We show around the world that when humans modify habitats, these unique species are consistently lost and are replaced by species that are found everywhere, such as pigeons in cities and rats in farmland," said Dr Tim Newbold, a research fellow at University College London.
            Rats, mice, sparrows and pigeons are examples of species with wide ranges that do well when natural habitats are replaced with farmland and cities, he said.
            However, the "narrow-ranged losers" include animals and plants which may have great cultural value, such as...”

            https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-46440396

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            • #66
              https://business.financialpost.com/o...in-big-trouble
              Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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              • #67
                Alberta has never truly been fat free and that’s never been the point, in my opinion. Rats get in, we deal with them swiftly. You can’t put up a wall and keep them out. This isn’t Trump’s America.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by jagators63 View Post
                  Alberta will never been totally free from rats because there are many rats that were never discovered in isolated places.
                  Don't know where you get your facts but we have no rats breeding here in Alberta. Whenever rats come into the province, they are eradicated.





                  http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/All/agdex3441

                  Rat awareness poster from the 1950s.
                  Last edited by Edmonton PRT; 08-12-2018, 02:22 PM.
                  Advocating a better Edmonton through effective, efficient and economical transit.

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                  • #69
                    Saskatchewan:


                    Total annihilation | Vue Weekly
                    2013
                    “In Edmonton, we haven’t had a confirmed rat—I don’t think we’ve had a confirmed rat this year. But we will. We’ll get one shortly. It’ll either be a pet rat or one that comes in somewhere. We expect three or four in Edmonton and half a dozen in Calgary,” Merrill says. “The rat-free status means that we don’t have an existing population of rats in Alberta. To maintain that, any time a rat comes in, we quickly annihilate it.”

                    The Saskatchewan border may become less of an issue in the future as Saskatchewan makes progress in becoming rat-free itself. Some municipalities have already attained this and more are expected. BC, on the other hand, will not have an easy time.

                    “They’re a coast province and the rats come in on ships. It’s a never-ending battle. Rats are difficult to contain when they jump off ships,” Merrill says.

                    ...”

                    http://www.vueweekly.com/total_annihilation/


                    Rats found in 2nd western Saskatchewan town

                    September 8, 2009

                    Maple Creek is about 40 kilometres from the border with Alberta, a province that bills itself as rat-free.

                    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saska...-town-1.830651
                    Saskatchewan declares war on rats
                    By Sean Pratt FOLLOW
                    Published: October 26, 2000


                    “Rats scuttled onto the Prairies half a century ago. The first colony was discovered on a farm near Alsask, Sask., in the summer of 1950.

                    Alberta immediately responded by setting up a rat control program and has been vigilant about keeping the province “rat free” ever since.

                    Alberta Agriculture spends $350,000 a year on its efforts to keep the vermin from setting up shop on Alberta farms. Rat control officers patrol a 29-kilometre-wide strip along the Saskatchewan border looking for infestations.

                    Saskatchewan was slower to react, initiating its rat control program in 1972. By then it was too late.

                    The scavenger was prevalent throughout the province. Pest control officers say the rat population has surpassed the human population.”

                    This year they will focus their efforts on a 40-kilometre-wide strip along the Alberta border. The plan is to get that area rat free and then slowly move east in similar increments. Rat-free status could take more than 10 years to accomplish.
                    ...

                    He estimates that rats cause between $15 and $20 million in damage to Saskatchewan farms each year.
                    ...



                    https://www.producer.com/2000/10/sas...s-war-on-rats/
                    Last edited by KC; 08-12-2018, 06:04 PM.

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                    • #70
                      Please change the title of this thread to ‘Alberta remains rat free’
                      Just enjoying another day in paradise.

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                      • #71
                        How Alberta remained rat-free
                        Province employed 250 pest control officers in 1968
                        CBC Archives · Posted: May 01, 2019 11:30 AM ET | Last Updated: 8 minutes ago


                        “..."We get out there just as quick as possible and destroy it," he said, noting that Albertans had been "pretty well educated" to report any stray rats.

                        In neighbouring Saskatchewan, rat-control efforts were less co-ordinated, and it showed.

                        "Saskatchewan ... is losing about $25 million a year to the rodent enemy," said Warren.

                        'General indifference' next door’
                        ...”


                        https://www.cbc.ca/archives/how-albe...free-1.5116832
                        Last edited by KC; 01-05-2019, 09:38 AM.

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                        • #72
                          Great promo for Alberta!!!!

                          Plus shows return on investment could be about 90 to 1.

                          BBC - Capital - How these cities became rat-free zones


                          “In many ways brown rats, also known as Norway rats, are remarkable. They are fantastically prolific breeders, with quick gestation periods and big litters of babies. They eat almost anything – domestic rubbish, rotting meat, grain – and live everywhere people live. They can chew through metal, swim long distances, survive 50ft (15m) falls, emerge from your toilet and, it turns out, feel empathy.

                          Originally native to northern China, these rats have spread across every continent except Antarctica. As numerous other species decline, rats appear to be thriving – most obviously in our cities. They’re seen as one of the world’s most invasive species, harming native wildlife populations, damaging property, contaminating foodstuffs and transmitting diseases.”



                          “Except if you are in Alberta. Home to the cities of Calgary and Edmonton, and with a population of about 4.3m, Alberta is famous for oil, national parks and ice hockey. But it also has a lesser-known claim to fame: it’s the only part of the world with significant urban and rural populations that does not have a breeding rat problem.

                          So how did an area the size of Texas achieve a feat unparalleled anywhere in the world? Was it luck or the result of strategic genius? And what’s Alberta gained from keeping rats out?” ...”



                          “ The rat control programme itself costs less than C$500,000 (US$372,000) annually, covering salaries for Merrill, six rat control zone officers and bait. It seems like a wise investment; back in 2004, the Alberta Research Council (ARC) estimated that the annual cost of having rats would be C$42.5m (US$31.6m). “


                          http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/201...rat-free-zones



                          “The ARC estimated that if each farm had 20 rats and each household one rat, then the rat population of Alberta would be 2.1m.”

                          Last edited by KC; 24-05-2019, 01:11 PM.

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