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  • Candidate Thomas Hinderks

    This thread is to ask questions of Candidate Thomas Hinderks - Councillor Ward 2.

    All members are asked to allow the Candidate to post first in his or her thread. This is to allow the Candidate ample opportunity to introduce their background, platform, and any other information they may feel is pertinent to this discussion.

    All decorum expected of members in the C2E Ask Forums will be expected here. An addendum is that posters may ask as many questions as they wish, but they are also politely asked to follow any instructions on posting or reply timelines that the Candidate expresses.

    Thank you to all for participating in the 2010 Connect2Edmonton Election Forum!
    Ow

  • #2
    When your ready I will answer as time permits

    Tom

    Comment


    • #3
      Hi Tom, thanks for taking the time to respond to questions here. You may have seen some other comments with people suggesting your knowlege/motivation is limited to one issue. Clearly, being a city councillor requires involvement, study, and decision making in a wide number of areas.

      My question is: please present a vision for a better Edmonton, under the assumption that the City Centre Airport is closed down. You may address Ward 2 issues specifically or comment on broader citywide issues. In the interests of keeping things relevant, why don't we say this is a vision of a better Edmonton in a 5-10 yr. timeframe. In your vision for the future of the city, tell us what's changed, what's gotten better, why people are excited about living in the city, why new people are moving to the city, etc. As stated above the only stipulation of this question is that we are assuming the airport is closed and the land is being used for some other purpose.

      Comment


      • #4
        p.s. this isn't meant to be a "trick" question or attempt to get you to say that the city is somehow better without the airport. The intent of the question is really to leave the airport out of the picture and focus on everything else about the city.

        Comment


        • #5
          Transplanted_Edm

          As I state and am going to quote from my platform my vision with or without the airport is the same.

          To quote
          "Developing Community
          Schools/Affordable housing
          As we have seen in other areas our schools have the potential to be at risk of
          closure due to low enrollment. Some have been closed over the years. To keep this

          from continuing to happen we need to be developing housing and other
          accommodation for young working families. While there are many good examples of
          increasing infill in the form of new duplexes replacing older smaller homes, but we
          need more.

          How can we promote this kind of private investment in a practical manner?
          PropertyTax incentives could be a good start. Encouraging revitalization in select
          areas with restricted incentive timelines. This would gain revitalization, create
          affordable alternative housing, attract new families to the area helping turn the tide
          for our schools and make the community more vibrant and interactive reducing
          crime as a side benefit.

          We also need to monitor and be careful of commercial residential developments
          being uncompleted, Bellwether as an example. A large number of affordable
          residences have been lost while this project is delayed and that damages
          community. Completion dates need to become part of the equation with new
          development to be sure this does not happen again.

          On one hand we must make the commercial administrative process faster and more
          efficient for developers, but we must also see that the commitment and financing
          is in place that these project don’t stop half way through. A system needs
          developed that allows for faster approvals in properly zoned areas and carries
          penalties if the projects are not completed on an agreed time line.

          Crime
          Small word, big problem and it goes beyond statistics…if people in the Ward
          don’t feel safe they are not safe. But simply adding police officers is not going to
          solve the problem.

          So how do we reduce the problem?
          To a very large extent it’s about getting back to working as a community,
          embracing programs like Neighborhood Watch, by looking out for our
          neighbors, using our cell phone and digital cameras when we see something out
          of the ordinary and reporting it, in detail, to our community police stations.
          Crime grows because we don’t work together, we don’t report incidents and we
          don’t gather the information and detail for our police to do their job.

          I truly believe that the EPS does the best job it can, but it takes many hours to
          deal with each incident and if the information and evidence is not there they
          cannot proceed and time is lost. If we as a community do not work with the police,
          gathering images, making notes, calling in tips and working with existing programs
          things will not change.
          Yes we need to increase police presence and work more on the community
          policing model, but we also need to work more as a community with our neighbors
          to make the change we want happen.

          Which is where our Community Leagues become an important part of the
          solution as does the Good Neighbors Programs currently operating through the
          City of Edmonton. Activity breeds activity, crime hates active, cooperating
          communities and working with these partners we have the ability to not only
          reduce the environment crime needs to prosper but to also bring our
          communities to life and meet and work with our neighbors to bring about
          positive change. But it means we must all get involved to determine where we
          want to go and work with each other and these existing programs to achieve the
          goals. No one and no level of government can do it for us, they can help, but we
          have to make it happen.

          Employment
          As I understand it, since 1995 Ward 2 has lost over 5000 jobs from the closure of:
          - The scheduled service and other forced reductions at ECCA
          - SPAR/L-3 Aerospace
          - and movement of many of the rail related jobs

          While retail level employment has increased within the Ward along 137ave
          there has been no replacement of the middle income employment that has been
          lost.

          Why is that?
          Especially when hundreds, up to as many as a thousand jobs are set to be lost with
          the total closure of ECCA.

          It does not matter if the City Centre Airport remains open or is closed these jobs
          must be replaced within the Ward. Firstly to benefit the Ward’s residents and
          second to eliminate as much commuting and the resulting infrastructure costs as
          possible to the benefit of all Edmontonians.

          It is being proposed that should the City Centre Airport close it be developed as a
          residential community of up to 30,000+ with an emphasis on “affordable housing”.

          Where will these residents work?
          A keystone of a smart sustainable community is that residents can live, work and
          play with minimal transportation requirements and preferably in a walkable format.
          I cannot imagine with the focus on “affordable housing” that the downtown core
          will be able to provide the tens of thousands of jobs that will be required to support
          a community of this size. The “affordable housing” focus also leads me to believe
          the residents will be from all facets of industry, office, trades, manufacturing,
          construction.

          Are we building a “SMART” community and then forcing the residents to
          commute to the fringes to gain reasonable employment?


          What is “SMART” about that concept?
          Does that not defeat the purpose? Creating a community that is forced to commute
          to work increases the demands on transportation infrastructure such as roads and
          LRT. It demands the increased use of automobiles, trucks and transit as a method
          of transport just to be able to be employed.

          Ether as an airport or as a redevelopment site there must be a focus on bringing
          long term reasonable and sustainable employment into Ward 2. Right now that is
          missing from everyone’s conversation.

          Rather than simply add to the commuting for employment issue we need to be
          integrating fabricating, manufacturing and high technology industry into the future
          of the ECCA site to create a truly “SMART” community. Building on the heritage of
          the site we have opportunity to create Educational, Historical and Tourism based
          components to create a real North Side destination for both our residents and
          visitors.

          Simply adding another massive residential community is not a “SMART” answer
          for Ward 2 or the City as a whole and a waste of the transportation (rail and road)
          infrastructure already in place."



          I hope that explains my thoughts and vision...if I have not made myself clear please say so and I will try to re express myself.



          Thanks for the question...I appreciate it.



          Tom
          Last edited by Thomas Hinderks; 21-09-2010, 08:51 PM. Reason: fix poor wording...oops

          Comment


          • #6
            Cycling Issues in Edmonton

            Strong, healthy communities need to be people-oriented. When youth can walk or bike to school, and when adults can walk to the grocery store or bike to work or school, neighbourhoods come alive. Safe, pleasant, active and fun: good cycling infrastructure connects neighbours with each other and connects neighbourhoods across the city.

            Whether they ride once or twice a week, only in fair-weather, or ride every day to work or school, cycling infrastructure matters to citizens.

            This infrastructure doesn’t happen by itself. It needs strong support from you. The City of Edmonton has developed a well-designed Bicycle Transportation Plan (BTP). It calls for $10-million to be spent each year for 10 years. The result: a complete, city-wide bicycle transportation network, including connector routes and pathways to get around within your neighbourhood and a city-wide skeleton network, fed by the connector routes. The connector system will be on low-traffic roads, suitable for both transportation and family recreation, while the city-wide network will provide direct corridors for bicycle access that moderately-skilled cyclists will feel comfortable on.

            The Edmonton Bicycle Commuters’ Society is polling candidates to collect their opinions on cycling issues. We are a non-partisan, non-profit society with a 30-year history of working to make cycling accessible to everyone in the city–whether they cycle only a few times a year, 265 bike-friendly days a year, or don’t even own a bike yet. We’ll be posting your responses to these questions, as well as any other responses we receive, without further commentary on our http://cycleedmonton.ca website so that constituents can review and compare candidates.
            1. Do you ride a bicycle? For leisure? Exercise? Commuting? How often?
            2. Similarly, do you walk or take transit? How often?
            3. Do you feel comfortable/safe riding on the road with traffic?
            4. What about your family? If not, why? How would you change bicycle infrastructure to make cyclists feel more safe?
            5. How do you celebrate Bike Month (June) in Edmonton?
            6. The number of cyclists in this city grew over 150% between 1994 and 2005, with over 25,000 trips made daily by bicycle, and we’ve seen even more rapid growth since 2005. Last year, City Council moved to earmark 5% of the Transportation Capital Budget toward Active Transportation Projects. This falls short of the 10% required to complete the bicycle and sidewalk strategies, and delays their completion for 25-50 years. What are your spending priorities in relation to active transportation?
            7. The 10-year Bicycle Transportation Plan calls for bikeways to be constructed across the city, making safe paths within neighbourhoods and connecting them to a City-wide network of bike corridors. Nearly 500 km of bikeways, covering the entire city, can be built for less than the cost of a single overpass. Given that cycling reduces the use of single-occupant vehicles, easing congestion and freeing parking spaces, and builds stronger, healthier communities, and is extremely cost-effective: would you commit to fully-funding the Bicycle Transportation Plan (BTP) if elected?
            8. Which specific departments and branches do you feel have a say in cycling issues? Who needs to be at the table to coordinate an effective strategy?
            9. Edmonton Zoning Bylaw #12800 includes requirements for bicycle parking. Unfortunately, this requirement is minimal, only applies to developments since 2001, and isn’t always enforced, leaving the city with inadequate bike parking. Secure parking facilities are critical for cyclists, as bicycles are easy targets for thieves. About 10 bicycles can be parked in the space of a single car-parking stall. What is your opinion on car & bicycle parking requirements, especially in the downtown and also in new, mid- and high-density redevelopments?
            10. Most cities our size have a municipal education program to help residents, businesses and institutions choose healthy, active modes of transportation. Despite a visible increase in the number of cyclists in Edmonton, the City Transportation branch currently has no education programs for cyclists. How would you (or the administration) encourage more people to choose a bike over a private automobile?
            11. Do you have a recent photo of yourself riding your bicycle? Please send it to us digitally!


            Thank you for taking the time to respond to our questionnaire, and good luck in your campaign!

            Regards,

            Chris Chan
            President
            Edmonton Bicycle Commuters’ Society
            http://edmontonbikes.ca/

            Comment


            • #7
              I've got a couple minutes so I will answer what I can.

              1. Do you ride a bicycle? For leisure?

              Occasionally, my family more often.

              2. Similarly, do you walk or take transit?

              Neither, my distance to work and travel requirements currently make it impractical.

              3. Do you feel comfortable/safe riding on the road with traffic?

              Other than major road ways yes.

              4. What about your family?

              As above.

              5. How do you celebrate Bike Month (June) in Edmonton?

              I do not, June is extremely busy for me in other areas.

              6. The number of cyclists in this city grew over 150% between 1994 and 2005, with over 25,000 trips made daily by bicycle, and we’ve seen even more rapid growth since 2005. Last year, City Council moved to earmark 5% of the Transportation Capital Budget toward Active Transportation Projects. This falls short of the 10% required to complete the bicycle and sidewalk strategies, and delays their completion for 25-50 years. What are your spending priorities in relation to active transportation?

              To be honest I feel the allocation is appropriate at this time, but how can we work partnerships with the bicycling community to create a shared funding model to move faster?

              7. The 10-year Bicycle Transportation Plan calls for bikeways to be constructed across the city, making safe paths within neighbourhoods and connecting them to a City-wide network of bike corridors. Nearly 500 km of bikeways, covering the entire city, can be built for less than the cost of a single overpass. Given that cycling reduces the use of single-occupant vehicles, easing congestion and freeing parking spaces, and builds stronger, healthier communities, and is extremely cost-effective: would you commit to fully-funding the Bicycle Transportation Plan (BTP) if elected?

              To be honest I would not, there are other priorities that will get greater usage by the residents of my area at this time. I also think we need to be realistic about each area’s commuting habits. Ward 2 has a very high volume of residents that need to commute large distances to their employment unfortunately making cycling impractical. Which is why bringing quality employment back into the Ward is so important. Once we are able to achieve that objective then the bicycling master plan becomes a much higher priority.

              8. Which specific departments and branches do you feel have a say in cycling issues? Who needs to be at the table to coordinate an effective strategy? Excellent question!

              Transportation obviously, but also Community Development and Edmonton Economic Development and the Edmonton Police Service and of course the Cycling community.

              9. Edmonton Zoning Bylaw #12800 includes requirements for bicycle parking. Unfortunately, this requirement is minimal, only applies to developments since 2001, and isn’t always enforced, leaving the city with inadequate bike parking. Secure parking facilities are critical for cyclists, as bicycles are easy targets for thieves. About 10 bicycles can be parked in the space of a single car-parking stall. What is your opinion on car & bicycle parking requirements, especially in the downtown and also in new, mid- and high-density redevelopments?

              To start with the obvious we should be enforcing current requirements. Beyond that area specific needs have to be addressed, some areas are going to have a higher need for Bicycle parking (downtown) and should be treated differently than areas with lower needs (Ward 2). I don’t believe a blanket approach will address, fairly, the needs of the areas or cyclists. How can your organization help collect the information that will lead to right requirements for each area?

              10. Most cities our size have a municipal education program to help residents, businesses and institutions choose healthy, active modes of transportation. Despite a visible increase in the number of cyclists in Edmonton, the City Transportation branch currently has no education programs for cyclists. How would you (or the administration) encourage more people to choose a bike over a private automobile?

              Key to my platform in Ward 2 is reducing the need to commute for employment and that to me is key to starting to educate people to make better choices, smaller vehicles, Transit use, Bicycles and of course walking. Working with related groups such as yours in helping educate employers to locate closer to residential communities and encouraging commuting reductions is the first step. Once that is achieved using existing programs such as Good Neighbours and other resources through Community Development in conjunction with advocates such as yourself we can make headway on changes current habits and providing the infrastructure to make those choices viable.

              11.Do you have a recent photo of yourself riding your bicycle? Please send it to us digitally! No sorry I don’t.
              Last edited by Thomas Hinderks; 22-09-2010, 04:18 PM. Reason: spacing

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for the answers Tom (and thanks to Chris for all of your work on an issue most dear to my heart).

                I appreciate that you're giving bike infrastructure some serious consideration. It's difficult to guage community need for bike infrastructure beyond considering how many people live in an area. If there is little or no bike infrastructure in place, it serves to prevent people from riding, so that those who might otherwise do it, can't. I see most people as potential bike commuters, but we've got a long way to go before those people consider it themselves.

                Your ward isn't really that far a commute by bike, if there's a decent route.

                That said, I still maintain we could make much greater use of the infrastructure we have now (mostly roads) if we concentrated more on educating people (cyclists and drivers) as to the rights, responsibilities, and best practices regarding cyclists.

                My question has to do with what you would do if and when the airport is gone. Do you have a vision for that land post airport? I don't really care that much about the issue one way or the other, and I have no problem keeping it as an airport, but I don't see that happening. My great fear is that we redevelop the area but fail to properly take advantage of the opportunity, and end up with more of the same, minus the airport.

                Could you see a permanent road that could be used for Indy, and perhaps converted to winter sport use such as a giant skating trail or ski trail? Any other ideas, sans airport?
                aka Jim Good; "The sooner you fall behind, the more time you have to catch up." - Steven Wright

                Comment


                • #9
                  Evening Jimbo

                  Thanks for the questions and comments

                  " Your ward isn't really that far a commute by bike, if there's a decent route."

                  You would be right if most people in the Ward worked downtown, but far too many are working on the fringes of the city including the Southside...my neighbor as an example commutes 30km each way every day and a high percentage of Ward 2 is facing that.

                  That said I completely agree with you on education on both cycling and making better choices both for the environment and the pocket book.

                  " My question has to do with what you would do if and when the airport is gone. Do you have a vision for that land post airport? I don't really care that much about the issue one way or the other, and I have no problem keeping it as an airport, but I don't see that happening. My great fear is that we redevelop the area but fail to properly take advantage of the opportunity, and end up with more of the same, minus the airport."

                  My vision for the area, with or without the airport (my choice is with) combines much of what you talk about in your question. Yes we can have an auto racing facility for 1-2 major events each year, plus a venue for cycling competitions, skiing and other uses on a scheduled basis. We can have a North end entertainment and outdoor sports/festival area. With an concentration on construction/fabrication and advanced technologies we can have an employment centre that economically fuels great change and maximizes the use of existing heavy transport infrastructure.

                  In addition with a restricted, but fully operating, airport we can cater to industries like Business Jet completions centres and service centres while sharing aerospace technology for use in Wind Turbine, Solar and other alternative developments.

                  As a residential community its just houses, maybe efficient green houses.

                  My vision is a place that creates employment to create infill development in Ward 2 and downtown protecting our schools with increased enrollment, short commutes with the option of high use LRT, cycling, walking to work reducing infrastructure loads and building community. A high employment, high technology centre that creates options of things to do and places to work that showcases what Edmonton can really do.

                  Thanks for the question

                  Tom Hinderks

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You have an anecdote from your neighbour, and I don't doubt that a good number of ward residents commute 30km to work. I know people that commute 100km to work. Anecdotes are just hand-waving. Here are some facts:

                    Weekday Daily Trips, 2005

                    Origin: Northwest
                    Destination:
                    Central: 48,900
                    Northwest: 159,900
                    Northeast: 66,500
                    Southeast: 25,400
                    Southwest: 13,600
                    West: 44,400

                    Total: 358,700

                    That's a pretty similar distribution compared to trips originating in the central region.

                    It's about 13km from 137 Ave and 127 St to West Edmonton Mall, which is about a 35 minute bike ride. Distances would be shorter to the downtown core, but let's not get caught up in arbitrary points--7 to 15km is a fairly average commute distance between these regions.

                    If we accept that cycling trips from NW to NW, West, or Central are reasonable by bicycle, then we're talking about 253,200 of 358,700 daily trips originating in the Northwest are within biking distance.

                    Perhaps the stories you've heard have overshadowed the remaining 71% of your electorate. The residents of Woodcroft, Inglewood, Spruce Avenue, Westwood, Prince Rupert, Prince Charles, Sherbrooke, Dovercourt all reside relatively close to central Edmonton. Where do they shop? Where do they go to school? Where do they work?

                    On average: 11 km from work, 4km from school, 5km from shopping, and 8km from social/recreation activities.

                    You can double-check the facts here.

                    Cycling matters, most especially because we don't see enough of it now thanks in large part to a lack of infrastructure. Education is wonderful and necessary: I'm a certified CANBIKE Instructor and just completed conducting another course last week.

                    But to get the numbers, you need to build the infrastructure. In cities all over the world, including winter cities, as soon as the infrastructure is built, it fills with cyclists.

                    Minneapolis (which has a climate pretty similar to Edmonton) has the second-highest number of bicycle commuters in the US, second to Portland. Ottawa has the highest number of bicycle commuters in North America. Madison, Wisconsin has bike lanes on every major street, and also happens to average below freezing for as many months each year as Edmonton.

                    If you go ride a bike around Montreal, you'll often find yourself slowed down by the sheer number of cyclists using that city's bike lanes. And that city gets a lot more snow than we do, too.

                    I'm hoping to hear some forward-thinking, Mr. Hinderks. What do you think?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good morning

                      A quick response before I have to go to work.

                      "You have an anecdote from your neighbour"

                      No not a single anecdote, dozens from across the Ward.

                      And we are assuming the data you provide still reflects the commuting distances.

                      I do not disagree with the desires you are promoting, just the priority.

                      Putting jobs into the Ward, attracting families, affordable housing, increasing school enrollment, building community and reducing crime as well as cutting commute distances and promoting smarter choices in commuting are my top priorities.

                      That is an ambitious list for a three year term, but if enough advancement is made on those priorities I would be willing to revisit other projects.

                      So again, we don't disagree on the ideas, just the order of priority.

                      Tom Hinderks

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hello Tom

                        Thank you for your official particiapation on the candidate forum.

                        I am aware of course of your position of wishing the airport to remain open, but I would like to thank you for being one of the very few who has approached this topic rationally throughout this very long debate.

                        Anyways two questions I have for you are the following.

                        1. Where do you stand on the expansion of LRT to NAIT and then to St. Albert. Do you feel that there is a need to fast track this and other LRT projects in the city and if so how do you propose to help facilitate this?

                        2. What do you define as major issues that pertain to your ward and to the city?

                        Thank you again for your time.
                        LRT is our future, time to push forward.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
                          Good morning

                          A quick response before I have to go to work.

                          "You have an anecdote from your neighbour"

                          No not a single anecdote, dozens from across the Ward.

                          And we are assuming the data you provide still reflects the commuting distances.

                          I do not disagree with the desires you are promoting, just the priority.

                          Putting jobs into the Ward, attracting families, affordable housing, increasing school enrollment, building community and reducing crime as well as cutting commute distances and promoting smarter choices in commuting are my top priorities.
                          Then I will accept that you have a bias towards a reliance on "dozens of anecdotes" over evidence-backed, rigourous, and recent hard statistics.

                          Your stated priorities: attracting families, increasing school enrollment, building community and reducing crime are all advanced by increasing support for cycling infrastructure. Families want to live in communities where their children can walk and bike to nearby amenities, including school. Communities are strengthened and crime is reduced by getting people outside and active in the community, instead of just speeding through in a car.
                          Last edited by fryingwoks; 23-09-2010, 02:01 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Edmcowboy11

                            If you don't mind I would like to reply to fryingwoks last post before addressing your questions.

                            fryingwoks

                            "Then I will accept that you have a bias towards a reliance on "dozens of anecdotes" over evidence-backed, rigourous, and recent hard statistics."

                            You should likely reassess your if you and your organization are looking to win allies.

                            Maybe if you understand how I arrived at my point of view and the decision to run we will have a better understanding.

                            Running for a political position was not on my "bucket list", but after giving serious thought to my concerns in Ward 2 I spent months talking with many dozens of residents through out the Ward about their concerns. To my surprise overwhelmingly they were the same as mine.

                            I then looked at what the known candidates prior to my announcement were addressing and again to my surprise few were addressing the common concerns shared by myself and those I had spoken with. This is what lead to my campaign platform which I consider my priorities if elected, you can view it on this thread.

                            http://www.connect2edmonton.ca/forum...290#post318290
                            post #36

                            No one brought bike paths up as a concern or issue in the Ward.

                            That said I do think beyond the current rather daunting list of priorities that bicycling and bike paths are part of the overall solution which I why I support the current initiatives and would not support reducing them, but based on the issues and priorities residents of the Ward have expressed I am not about to move your initiative up the priority list until the other objectives are reached.

                            If I am elected however I am open to discuss City of Edmonton and Edmonton Bicycle Commuters’ Society partnerships:
                            1) To further education on cycling
                            2) To speed implementation of the bike paths you are promoting
                            3) Implement suggestions and ideas into new developments

                            So I am not closing the door on options, nor I am I in opposition to your goals but they are not in the top priorities at this time.

                            I hope this leads you to better understand of my point of view and how I have arrived at it...if it does not that is unfortunate.

                            Thank you for the questions and responses.

                            Tom Hinderks

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Edmcowboy11

                              Thanks for the questions

                              "1. Where do you stand on the expansion of LRT to NAIT and then to St. Albert. Do you feel that there is a need to fast track this and other LRT projects in the city and if so how do you propose to help facilitate this?"

                              Expansion of the LRT to NAIT is in progress and while I disagree with some details I support the plan as it now stands including the timing.

                              Going from NAIT to St Albert I do have concerns.
                              The location of the line and station puzzle me with relation to the airport lands when no determination of a plan for development has been forward...I would have thought that would be needed before laying out the line route.

                              So far I can find no agreement to be able to cross the CN yards, I stand to be corrected. If there is not just how do we plan to cross? Over/Under and how will this effect the route?

                              At the top end where it curves to St Albert I again have questions of the route as it seems to cater to St Albert residents rather than those in Ward 2/3.

                              So fast tracking with these questions, particularly those regarding the development of the airport lands makes me very hesitant to recommend fast tracking the route till they are answered.

                              Overall the concept of fast tracking in other Wards I can support if the dollars are attainable and the community supports the planning.

                              I believe long term a well thought out LRT/Transit system is important to the city but lets not forget other methods of reducing commuting issues such as reducing commute distances for employment, encouraging smaller cars and other smart choices so education is also important.

                              "2. What do you define as major issues that pertain to your ward and to the city?"

                              Jobs...long term sustainable house buying employment, it fuels everything in my platform from protecting schools through increased enrollment, affordable housing infill in Ward 2 and downtown. For more see my platform as noted in the above post

                              Diversification...Jane Jacobs book, Economies of Cities", as I read the parts I have had time to digest so far, points clearly that "the city" is to be the economic driver of a region, right now we are not doing that. We are being driven by the oil sands and the oil business and now is the time and opportunity to get serious about change and start moving to bring new and more industry to Ward 2 and Edmonton as a whole returning us to be being the economic driver and stabilizing the employment base.

                              Marketing Edmonton...detail in my platform but frankly right now we do a lousy job and the image we present is not the one of the City I know and it reflects in how we are perceived across the world and the kind of business we can attract and retain.

                              I hope that answers your questions, if not please comment and I will try to fill in the blanks.

                              Thanks again

                              Tom Hinderks

                              Comment

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