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Thread: Elm trees

  1. #1
    C2E Hard Core Contributor
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    Default Elm trees

    A couple of weeks ago I listened to Stuart McLean, broadcasting the Vinyl Cafe from Winnipeg.
    One of the points he made about Winnipeg is that they have the largest collection of Elm trees in
    the world. I thought Edmonton held that distinction.

    Can anyone clarify?
    Fly Edmonton first. Support EIA

  2. #2
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    Default

    I thought that Edmonton held that record as well.
    Almost always open to debate...

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by 24karat View Post
    One of the points he made about Winnipeg is that they have the largest collection of Elm trees in
    the world.
    You would think there would be an elm forest somewhere with more trees.

  4. #4
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    Default

    I would imagine that Winnipeg has a much larger collection of older neighbourhoods from that era.

  5. #5
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    Default

    I think Edmonton's is the largest DUTCH ELM free urban forest.

  6. #6
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    Default

    i hope that very cold snap in winter halted those damn bugs from killing more trees.

  7. #7

    Default

    This quite informative... particularly the resistance section

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dutch_elm_disease

    This was another sad situation...
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_chestnut
    "It is estimated that the total number of chestnut trees in eastern North America was over 3 billion,... can be found in Sherwood, Oregon, since much of western North America is still free of blight. American Chestnut thrives as far north as Revelstoke, British Columbia."

    ..."The intrinsic and economical value of returning the American Chestnut tree to its former place in the Eastern forest is incalculable. ...It is thought that panic logging during the early years of the blight may have unwittingly destroyed trees which had resistance to this disease and thus aggravated this calamity."
    Last edited by KC; 05-06-2008 at 11:43 PM.

  8. #8

    Default

    Interesting...

    'Extinct' elms found in Queen's garden in Edinburgh - BBC News

    Dr Max Coleman, of the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE), told the BBC's Good Morning Scotland radio programme: "That's the most striking thing about this story. It seems very odd on the face of it that these massive trees, that are probably the most photographed trees in the grounds of the palace, have gone unrecognised until now.
    "I think the reason is that firstly they were never common, these Wentworth elms. If you pull your tree book off the shelf to try and look them up, you won't find Wentworth elm listed in the books.

    "Secondly, and probably more importantly, there are relatively few people these days that are familiar with elm trees and unfortunately the reason for that is that since the 1970s we've lost somewhere between 25 and 75 million elms across the UK as a whole due to Dutch Elm Disease."

    http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-...-fife-37543803

  9. #9

    Default

    About the elms in Edmonton, we have many ash trees also. I can not say how much ash, but where I live right now in McCauley most of the trees are ash. The most distinguishable difference, elms have very nice vase look while ash's have less groomed look, on my block I have ash, elm, and now an oak tree they just planted 25feet from my house on the boulevard. I was told by a tree trimmer when I lived in westmount, Edmonton used to have maples planted and were replaced mostly with the elms way back. There is a tree in westmount that even has a heritage plaque not sure the species but the trunk is over 4feet wide

  10. #10

    Default

    Really hardy maples that will grow big have been rare. My uncle had a huge one in Belgravia, it was notable enough that seeds and cuttings were collected to see if it could be the start of a new hardy cultivar.

    Most of our maples, besides the scrubby Manitoba's, are Norway or Japanese variety's that don't get very big, not the silver and sugar maples of eastern Canada.
    There can only be one.

  11. #11

    Question

    I think it was the Edmonton horticultural society that planted silver maple street trees in about 1910 or 1920 down across from where High Street is. I think many are still there and are huge trees. Somewhere on or between 124 and about 126th? Streets
    Last edited by KC; 09-10-2016 at 10:01 PM.

  12. #12

    Default

    ^^ MacEwan Downtown has several silver maples, on 106 Street.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

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