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Thread: Lest we forget: November 11, 11:11 a.m.

  1. #1

    Default Lest we forget: November 11, 11:11 a.m.

    In Flanders Fields

    By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD (1872-191
    Canadian Army

    IN FLANDERS FIELDS the poppies blow
    Between the crosses row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below.

    We are the Dead. Short days ago
    We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
    Loved and were loved, and now we lie
    In Flanders fields.

    Take up our quarrel with the foe:
    To you from failing hands we throw
    The torch; be yours to hold it high.
    If ye break faith with us who die
    We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
    In Flanders fields.

  2. #2

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    In Remembrance

    To those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice, to those left behind and to those still fighting we express our heartfelt thanks and sincere appreciation.

    Thank you is not enough but please know that we will never forget.

  3. #3
    C2E SME
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    For the Loyal Edmonton Regiment soldiers who fought in Ortona during the Christmas of 1943...

    For the Edmonton soldiers who serve in Afghanistan today...

    To all Canadian soldiers who have served Canada in war and peacetime...

    I (and many others) thank you for everything that you have done for keeping Canada a free and democratic nation. We will never know the full price that you paid for our freedom.

  4. #4

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    Lest we forget.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  5. #5
    C2E Long Term Contributor
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    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  6. #6

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    I went to the cenotaph for the ceremonies today.

    It has become very easy to see all around and to understand what they fought against 75 years ago.

    Swastikas on windows are not just so 1938.

  7. #7

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    After the Air Canada ban on wearing poppies, I heard someone on the radio the other day saying that remembrance day is about all the things we have today as a result (freedoms, democracy, etc.). It was very much focused on ourselves and the lives lost and I don't think it went to the depth and breadth of the meaning of Remembrance Day. I think that the actual lives lost and our gains are only part of it.

    Another part of it is that when thousands upon thousands of young soldiers and others died, often their futures as well as future family lineages died with them. People of the day not only suffered the tragedy of lost living family members, but they also lost futures that otherwise would have been. So many parents must have been expecting their child to grow up and then have family and so on and on. So many futures were not only erased of existence, so many yet to be born futures were also wiped out of any potential existence. Grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, etc. that could never be. The deaths of so many back during the various wars means that all around us today, we are missing bodies, or in some sense souls, that should be standing before us, but simply aren't. They not only gave up their lives but in many, many cases they gave up their children's, and children's children's lives.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    After the Air Canada ban on wearing poppies, I heard someone on the radio the other day saying that remembrance day is about all the things we have today as a result (freedoms, democracy, etc.). It was very much focused on ourselves and the lives lost and I don't think it went to the depth and breadth of the meaning of Remembrance Day. I think that the actual lives lost and our gains are only part of it.

    Another part of it is that when thousands upon thousands of young soldiers and others died, often their futures as well as future family lineages died with them. People of the day not only suffered the tragedy of lost living family members, but they also lost futures that otherwise would have been. So many parents must have been expecting their child to grow up and then have family and so on and on. So many futures were not only erased of existence, so many yet to be born futures were also wiped out of any potential existence. Grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, etc. that could never be. The deaths of so many back during the various wars means that all around us today, we are missing bodies, or in some sense souls, that should be standing before us, but simply aren't. They not only gave up their lives but in many, many cases they gave up their children's, and children's children's lives.
    This is a nice thought.

    However, all memorials, including war memorials, are not for the dead but for the living.

    Over time previous wars that may have been genocidal, that shed enormous blood, that redrew borders and destroyed nations and marked epochs, have been forgotten utterly, or, if not totally, then still to the point that certainly people do not line up for a solemn two minutes of silence. Whether or not these wars were won or lost is not the issue, nor the number of dead; but what they were fought over is inconvenient or simply meaningless, and so they are not remembered. There are in Canada no commemorations of the Northwest Rebellion or the Boer war. The war of 1812 is remembered but somehow apologetically, after all who wants to remind the powers that be that we burned the white house down? As for the Seven Years War, it is remembered, or was when I was in elementary school, simply as a struggle of titans that died on the battlefield and gave rise to something that evolved into ur-Canada -- a story so muddled as to be incoherent.

    I am not decrying this state of affairs.

    Nor am I condemning anyone who fails to commemorate the wars we commemorate, or pay respects to the dead. Any more than I am praising anyone who does commemorate. To do either would be far too self-serving.

    People who fail to commemorate do so, for a fact, because the war being remembered means little or nothing to them.

    That it does not does not condemn them. No one cries for the dead in the Seven Years War.

    If something happens to make anyone see an old war in a new and more importantly a significant light, they will commemorate it. They will commemorate it because it means something to them.

    Because they are the living. They will commemorate the dead because they are the living.

    Until this year I never paid attention to World War II because I thought that what the troops who fought it were tools of two sides, both equally bad. This year I changed my mind. And so I went.

    However, I still believe that the children-of-children aspect of it, although a little sobering, is not really germane. We do not worry about the children of children of children of Dresden or Hiroshima -- nor of the troops who fought on the other side, with ideas of patriotism and military valor scarcely distinguishable from ours. So let's not get carried away.

    Instead, if it means anything to us, let us remember that we commemorate decent people who died for the sake of doing the decent thing -- and their comrades who survived, and, we earnestly pray, kept doping the decent thing.

    Surely that is enough.
    Last edited by AShetsen; 11-11-2016 at 09:47 PM.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by AShetsen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    After the Air Canada ban on wearing poppies, I heard someone on the radio the other day saying that remembrance day is about all the things we have today as a result (freedoms, democracy, etc.). It was very much focused on ourselves and the lives lost and I don't think it went to the depth and breadth of the meaning of Remembrance Day. I think that the actual lives lost and our gains are only part of it.

    Another part of it is that when thousands upon thousands of young soldiers and others died, often their futures as well as future family lineages died with them. People of the day not only suffered the tragedy of lost living family members, but they also lost futures that otherwise would have been. So many parents must have been expecting their child to grow up and then have family and so on and on. So many futures were not only erased of existence, so many yet to be born futures were also wiped out of any potential existence. Grandchildren, nieces, nephews, cousins, etc. that could never be. The deaths of so many back during the various wars means that all around us today, we are missing bodies, or in some sense souls, that should be standing before us, but simply aren't. They not only gave up their lives but in many, many cases they gave up their children's, and children's children's lives.
    This is a nice thought.

    However, all memorials, including war memorials, are not for the dead but for the living.

    Over time previous wars that may have been genocidal, that shed enormous blood, that redrew borders and destroyed nations and marked epochs, have been forgotten utterly, or, if not totally, then still to the point that certainly people do not line up for a solemn two minutes of silence. Whether or not these wars were won or lost is not the issue, nor the number of dead; but what they were fought over is inconvenient or simply meaningless, and so they are not remembered. There are in Canada no commemorations of the Northwest Rebellion or the Boer war. The war of 1812 is remembered but somehow apologetically, after all who wants to remind the powers that be that we burned the white house down? As for the Seven Years War, it is remembered, or was when I was in elementary school, simply as a struggle of titans that died on the battlefield and gave rise to something that evolved into ur-Canada -- a story so muddled as to be incoherent.

    I am not decrying this state of affairs.

    Nor am I condemning anyone who fails to commemorate the wars we commemorate, or pay respects to the dead. Any more than I am praising anyone who does commemorate. To do either would be far too self-serving.

    People who fail to commemorate do so, for a fact, because the war being remembered means little or nothing to them.

    That it does not does not condemn them. No one cries for the dead in the Seven Years War.

    If something happens to make anyone see an old war in a new and more importantly a significant light, they will commemorate it. They will commemorate it because it means something to them.

    Because they are the living. They will commemorate the dead because they are the living.

    Until this year I never paid attention to World War II because I thought that what the troops who fought it were tools of two sides, both equally bad. This year I changed my mind. And so I went.

    However, I still believe that the children-of-children aspect of it, although a little sobering, is not really germane. We do not worry about the children of children of children of Dresden or Hiroshima -- nor of the troops who fought on the other side, with ideas of patriotism and military valor scarcely distinguishable from ours. So let's not get carried away.

    Instead, if it means anything to us, let us remember that we commemorate decent people who died for the sake of doing the decent thing -- and their comrades who survived, and, we earnestly pray, kept doping the decent thing.

    Surely that is enough.
    Excellent points. However, those who lost relatives likely do think of what might have been. That sentiment applies to all young loss, such as those dying in car accidents, due to sickness, etc, so you may be correct that we as a population neither generally don't think of that lost potential nor wish to commemorate such loss.

  10. #10

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    The Fallen of World War II

    "An animated data-driven documentary about war and peace, The Fallen of World War II looks at the human cost of the second World War and sizes up the numbers to other wars in history, including trends in recent conflicts."



    https://player.vimeo.com/video/128373915

    http://www.fallen.io/ww2/
    Last edited by KC; 22-11-2016 at 06:19 PM.

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