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Thread: Freakin Magpies

  1. #1
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    Default Freakin Magpies

    As I sat at my friends place,he counted 17 of these evil winged pests in one tree. Asking how he stand the noise and mess,he asked what else can one do?They have dove at both my pets and myself with no nests anywhere close by.The garbage is strewn and they kill anything smaller than themselves That said, I looked online and saw several traps,all humane. I see how they work, however, I am the skeptic. Has anyone else heard of or eliminated any of these winged demons using a trap?I'm ready to get one and see how effective they are.
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    I don't know, but wouldn't a plastic owl parked in your tree keep the magpies at bay?
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  3. #3

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    The one benefit of having a neighborhood chronically over run with half feral or abandoned cats is we have significantly less of a magpie problem and you see dead ones all over the place. Basically if a cat gets one magpie, other magpies try to save it and they get it too. We once discovered a pile of 4 magpies all took out by one cat at one time. Cat didn't even eat them, just sport kill.

    So we have lots of cats roaming around shitting all over the place and there is NOTHING you can do to keep them out of the yard or garden. But less Magpies, mice, squirrels etc. Although cat fights at 3-4am (always when it is) are considerably more disruptive than anything the magpies do. Haven't once had magpies attack our garbage but you can't put a bag out without 3 cats trying to get at it instantly. people in the whole neighborhood have to store their garbage in garage until garbage day or build a gated garbage enclosure as we have done. The only thing worse than roaming cats would be Raccoons.
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    All things considered magpies are not bad if one has to have pests around as long as their numbers don't make them a flock. They are a darned sight better than over fertile pigeons and the whitewash they leave behind. Raccoons while cute incessantly rummage through garbage / compost containers, dig up gardens, love to eat Koi and squat in attics.
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  5. #5

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    Magpies are kind of funny. They seem to be the most uncoordinated birds and occasionally have accidents or get in magpie squabbles and its like Flying Tom and Jerry circus. Free entertainment. We don't mind them much and hardly any ****. They aren't prodigious shitters like seagulls, pigeons. with Magpies theres virtually no sign of them being around except the squawking noises they make which are even funny. its hardly what I consider a nuisance species.
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  6. #6

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    My father hates them because they attack calves' eyes and steal dog food on the farm. I like them in the city, though, as they are actually pretty to look at with their iridescent feather, and as noted have interesting personalities.

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    Really surprised the cats are getting your magpies Replacement. In my neighbourhood the magpies taunt and attack the cats and I never see the cat get the bird. There's always a swarm of them over every cat around and you can tell exactly where the cats are by the squawking. As soon as cat gets on a fence, a magpie will start pecking their *** and when the cat jumps around another will be pecking him from the other side. The magpies around here seem to be driven away by the ravens during the summer and then the owls take over the hood in October.

  8. #8

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    Our neighborhood had a lot of magpies at one time, but our neighbor's cat (an adopted stray) caught and killed 4 of them within a month, and our magpies all seemed to disappear. We notice the songbirds a lot more instead of the squawks now, which is very nice.

    Depends on the cat, I guess.

  9. #9

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    When we move in 14 years ago there were lots of cats and few magpies, then the outdoor cat population dropped and we had more magpies for a while. now we're somewhere in between.

    I've heard of cats taking out a whole squad of Magpies as they each come to investigate the first casualty, but I've also heard of clans of magpies harassing cats effectively enough that they're chased to shelter.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krokwalk View Post
    Really surprised the cats are getting your magpies Replacement. In my neighbourhood the magpies taunt and attack the cats and I never see the cat get the bird. There's always a swarm of them over every cat around and you can tell exactly where the cats are by the squawking. As soon as cat gets on a fence, a magpie will start pecking their *** and when the cat jumps around another will be pecking him from the other side. The magpies around here seem to be driven away by the ravens during the summer and then the owls take over the hood in October.
    The standard housecat gets intimidated by magpies typically. As mentioned we have some cats in our neighborhood that are either feral or are wild. Or many that are past domestic lineage that are born in the wild, live in the wild, with no owner. Such animals become much more adept at hunting. They become more aggressive. The catfights in our neighborhood are something else. The real fur flying variety. You can pick up clumps, see damaged, hurt cats, these are not standard domestics running around only that people let roam. Some of these cats we have are bad news. Also essentially why people shouldn't let standard cared for kitty roam around as sometimes those cats get hurt badly. We've had some instances where we had to locate an owner due to a cat requiring vet care. We've had to even intervene in our yard where it was quite clear a literally defenseless cat was being attacked by another dominant cat.


    So the magpies get surprised occasionally here when they are dealing with a more aggressive cat. Cats would be no match for owls or ravens but they can do in a magpie. The magpies think this not to be the case because most cats they deal with in a city are domestics. I like magpies and I hate to see it but sometimes I see them messing with the wrong cat and I wish they could differentiate. They don't. I shoo them away if I see this occurring but it doesn't help. Same cat or type of cat probably gets them.
    Last edited by Replacement; 07-08-2018 at 02:07 PM.
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    I know what you mean about feral cats. When I first moved back to Edmonton in the early eighties I rented a house that had a broken window in the basement and a band of feral cats with several newborns / very tiny fur balls. I dressed in leathers and eventually I caught all the cats to take to the SPCA except for one of the tiny ones. This guy could actually run across the ceiling and when I eventually did capture him by sealing off doorways he bit through an industrial set of welding gloves and drew copious amounts of blood. He could not have weighed more than about 8 ounces.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by howie View Post
    I don't know, but wouldn't a plastic owl parked in your tree keep the magpies at bay?
    I have tried that.Along with a pellet pistol. If they were not so aggressive, I'd say no big deal. I spoke with several neighbors and they all want them gone as they as well are having their pets attacked. Sounds like the trap will be forth coming.
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  13. #13

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    You need to place the owl out in the open and up high where it's clearly visible and has nothing dark behind it. Firstly because this is what real owls do when searching for prey, and secondly because the magpies will definitely spot it. Trust me this works very very well for all birds except crows, they just don't give a f.... lol

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    The place I used to work at (recently retired kind of) placed plastic owls on perches at all the entrances to the warehouse. They also used some kind of electronic predator bird call device but the pigeons they were trying to keep out were back within a couple of weeks and they had to resort back to hiring someone to trap and dart them every couple of months.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krokwalk View Post
    I know what you mean about feral cats. When I first moved back to Edmonton in the early eighties I rented a house that had a broken window in the basement and a band of feral cats with several newborns / very tiny fur balls. I dressed in leathers and eventually I caught all the cats to take to the SPCA except for one of the tiny ones. This guy could actually run across the ceiling and when I eventually did capture him by sealing off doorways he bit through an industrial set of welding gloves and drew copious amounts of blood. He could not have weighed more than about 8 ounces.
    Over the decades we've made a habit of adopting roaming kitties or their litter but at any given time have kept the numbers to a maximum of 3. If we have 3 we're filled up. We once got a 4th. Was a mistake from the start as this guy was too wild, Would literally run back and forth upside down on our insulated duct cold air intake in the basement. Also got in the recroom once and tried running upside down on the drop ceiling. Which caused it to drop...

    To say that this fellow was too wild for captivity of any kind was understatement. We let him go as he did not acclimatize to be an indoor cat. All the others did. I should mention he had a crazed excited look almost all the time. It was like he was turned to 11. Even the other cats were not comfortable.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

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