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Thread: Kamloops - buying advice

  1. #1
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    Default Kamloops - buying advice

    Hey I'd like to hear some opinions from some people here who know or are from Kamloops.

    I know just a little bit about the city from when I lived in Kelowna and had friends in Kamloops, but my information is a good 9 years old already.

    I'm looking a 0.25 ac riverfront property in Brocklehurst on the North Shore. When my friends lived there they quite liked the area and it was very much transitional at the time, does anyone have any current opinions or experience?

    Are riverfront properties in Kamloops considered desirable? It's in a 20 year flood plane zone. I always try to find properties that are marketable for sale or rent even in a poor economy.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    Don't buy anything in a flood plane anywhere. But particularly in very hilly and arid areas that are prone to flash floods. The Kamloop area is semi arid desert classification afairc. Such typography, and ground does not absorb water well. When there are problems with an abundance of water (rare) in these areas its very problematic when it does occur. 20 years may sound like a lot, and I think that kind of thing is typically understated. The flood could happen um, right now, oh wait it is happening right now.. could be a reason those properties are on sale. Some of them are under water as we speak. Is your question serious?


    http://bc.ctvnews.ca/more/photo-gall...oops-1.1928950

    As far as the 20 year stuff goes heres the last time they had a major problem, 2014, 3yrs ago.


    http://bc.ctvnews.ca/more/photo-gall...oops-1.1928950

    Seems to me Kamloops is a disaster town. Driving through there it seems like it as well. Plus scorching heat, no shade, can't grow hardly anything, and blow transmissions on a regular basis getting in and out of town. How could anybody choose to live in Kamloops? A place that have automotive garages situated on most every hilltop for all those blown hoses, overheated engines, shot transmission. Place is a nightmare for Truckers. The whole region is. I try to plan around even stopping for gas in Kamloops so I don't have to. The turnoffs are ****** as well. Once turned off to get to a gas station without realizing that the highway there had a turnout but no re-entry at that point. lol. With no gas stations being conveniently pull out located. You have to leave the road, then try to find your way back. Now I get gas in Clearwater. Fill right up to the brim so I have enough to get to Vancouver.
    Last edited by Replacement; 19-05-2017 at 01:29 PM.
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    ^Definitely avoid anything in a floodplain anywhere, but otherwise Kamloops isn't _that_ bad. Yes, it is a semi-desert that is too hot in the summer, but it is no worse than anywhere else in the SW interior. It is cooler and wetter than Osoyoos, and that is a popular tourist destination. Just make sure you have central AC, don't try to grow a lawn, and remember to water your vegetable gardens and fruit trees (mmm..peaches and apricots). The climb out of the valley to go west is no worse than the grades further along the Coquihalla. If your car can't make it up the hill, it needed fixed anyways. The highway layout sucks for tourist services, especially when arriving on highway 5 rather than highway 1 (my gas stop is Barriere or Merrit, usually cheaper than Clearwater) but at least you can get through relatively quickly (unlike, say, Kelowna).

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    20 year flood plain means there's a 5% chance every year that it could flood. Houses of all ages in Edmonton flood just with the rain every year and that isn't covered under insurance. I had a house once upon a time in SW Edmonton with a new weeping tile system that didn't cut it and many people in my area were flooded - at least insurance would cover a river flood. I mean there's multi-million dollar properties all over BC on various types of waterfront and I'm assuming that kind of property always comes with a flood risk.

    I actually like the weather in the area - and my question was to do more with people having specific neighborhood knowledge of Kamloops rather than city opinions although I highly appreciate the opinions about the 20 year floodplain.

    Thanks again.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Downtown View Post
    Hey I'd like to hear some opinions from some people here who know or are from Kamloops.

    I know just a little bit about the city from when I lived in Kelowna and had friends in Kamloops, but my information is a good 9 years old already.

    I'm looking a 0.25 ac riverfront property in Brocklehurst on the North Shore. When my friends lived there they quite liked the area and it was very much transitional at the time, does anyone have any current opinions or experience?

    Are riverfront properties in Kamloops considered desirable? It's in a 20 year flood plane zone. I always try to find properties that are marketable for sale or rent even in a poor economy.

    Thanks in advance.
    Kamloops likely has the hottest, sunniest summers of any city in Canada with a population over 50,000 or so, and the winters are among the mildest. Nice if you're in to that kind of weather.

    The likelihood of flooding in buying a north shore home in Brocklehurst should definitely be looked in to. So should odors from the Domtar pulp mill directly opposite on the south shore. I'm sure some of the locals might say that's the smell of money .

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    Thanks for all the advice.

    Like some folks I romanticize the idea of having a chunk of land next to some water in BC and not paying in the 7 figures for it - I'll take a good look at the floodplains and maybe ask some folks working in their yards when I go have a look.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    ^Definitely avoid anything in a floodplain anywhere, but otherwise Kamloops isn't _that_ bad. Yes, it is a semi-desert that is too hot in the summer, but it is no worse than anywhere else in the SW interior. It is cooler and wetter than Osoyoos, and that is a popular tourist destination. Just make sure you have central AC, don't try to grow a lawn, and remember to water your vegetable gardens and fruit trees (mmm..peaches and apricots). The climb out of the valley to go west is no worse than the grades further along the Coquihalla. If your car can't make it up the hill, it needed fixed anyways. The highway layout sucks for tourist services, especially when arriving on highway 5 rather than highway 1 (my gas stop is Barriere or Merrit, usually cheaper than Clearwater) but at least you can get through relatively quickly (unlike, say, Kelowna).
    Its the gradient of the climb, and how continuous it is out of Kamloops going west that is the problem. Anybody that has pulled a trailer with anything but the most powerful rig knows the experience. Climb, climb, climb all the while checking your gauges.. Driven all through the country and Kamloops is the worst for a steep and continual gradient with no end. Truck drivers HATE Kamloops. Just getting out of Kamloops is worse than the Coquihalla. Worse than Obed summit. Actually the drive to Radium is really bad as well, probably worse. But at least that Kootenay National Park area is beautiful.

    Maybe I'm not one for desert environments but I find Kamloops as butt ugly as the name. just can't stand the place. Osoyoos, no better.

    It would take a shitload of water use to try to have a reasonable garden in Kamloops.

    Either no rain or flashflooding.

    Plus you're dealing with poisonous snakes, spiders, and termites. Terrible place to have a house imo.
    "if god exists and he allowed that to happen, then its better that he doesn't exist"

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Downtown View Post
    20 year flood plain means there's a 5% chance every year that it could flood. Houses of all ages in Edmonton flood just with the rain every year and that isn't covered under insurance. I had a house once upon a time in SW Edmonton with a new weeping tile system that didn't cut it and many people in my area were flooded - at least insurance would cover a river flood. I mean there's multi-million dollar properties all over BC on various types of waterfront and I'm assuming that kind of property always comes with a flood risk.

    I actually like the weather in the area - and my question was to do more with people having specific neighborhood knowledge of Kamloops rather than city opinions although I highly appreciate the opinions about the 20 year floodplain.

    Thanks again.
    The Kamloops version of flooding, where the river or water is right up to the house would only be found in Edmonton in the flats. Riverdale so on, and only in the worst possible storms with the banks seeping. Dealing with water coming right up to your door is a completely different thing and concerns with foundations destroyed, house drifting off, rendered uninhabitable etc. About the extent of "flooding" in Edmonton is a sewer back up in a basement or water entering. Quite often due to people not properly maintaining eaves and downspouts or not having a properly sloped gradient leading water AWAY from the house.

    My own opinion is that people that buy property on flood plains shouldn't be able to be insured. I actually don't know how they even are accepted. But in anycase decisions like that drive up costs for all homeowners. These are avoidable calamities. Flood plains are knowns. Stay away.

    Nor is this occasional, nor is it every 20 yrs. Kamloops has had at least 4 huge flood events since 2012. This seems almost an annual event in the town. But each time they act like "its never been like this here" Its as if theres some local scam trying to downplay how often this occurs. I think in my lifetime I've heard "disaster area" around 20 different times regarding Kamloops.

    Kamloops, as well as having stifling heat in the summer has virtually no wind, and so whatever pollution, smog, smoke from forest fires, slash burning, or the pulp mill just hangs over the town and valley like a continual fog. Hot and some of the worst air quality found anywhere in Canada. I feel like I'm in a smoky, smelly, hot forest fire whenever I'm in the place. Also remember driving through there lots in the days before AC.
    Last edited by Replacement; 20-05-2017 at 01:22 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Its the gradient of the climb, and how continuous it is out of Kamloops going west that is the problem. Anybody that has pulled a trailer with anything but the most powerful rig knows the experience. Climb, climb, climb all the while checking your gauges.. Driven all through the country and Kamloops is the worst for a steep and continual gradient with no end. Truck drivers HATE Kamloops. Just getting out of Kamloops is worse than the Coquihalla. Worse than Obed summit. Actually the drive to Radium is really bad as well, probably worse. But at least that Kootenay National Park area is beautiful.
    The Kamloops hill is 10 km of maximum 6% grade, with a total elevation gain of 370 m (from 350 m at the bottom to 720 m at the scale). https://www.google.ca/maps/@50.66576...7i13312!8i6656
    The eastbound approach to the Coquihalla summit is 20 km of up to 8.5% grade, with a total elevation gain of 850 m (400 m to 1250 m). http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/dri...de-profile.pdf
    My experiences are consistent with the numbers. My Outback can pull my boat out of Kamloops at the 100 km/h speed limit with no problems, but I can't do more than 85 km/h on the steepest grades of the eastbound approach to the Coquihalla summit, and I before I added an extra transmission cooler I had to go even slower to avoid overheating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Maybe I'm not one for desert environments but I find Kamloops as butt ugly as the name. just can't stand the place. Osoyoos, no better.

    It would take a shitload of water use to try to have a reasonable garden in Kamloops.

    Either no rain or flashflooding.

    Plus you're dealing with poisonous snakes, spiders, and termites. Terrible place to have a house imo.
    I'm not a big desert fan either. I don't get why Osoyoos is crawling with Lower Mainlanders in the summer when they have to so many nicer places to visit closer to home, and the only reason to go to Kamloops as a tourist is the abundance of cheap motels. However, as a place to live Kamloops probably offers one of the better combinations of reasonably priced housing and reasonable prospects of employment in BC, and any vegetable garden I would find manageable (no more than about 10 m^2) wouldn't require an unreasonable amount of water.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Its the gradient of the climb, and how continuous it is out of Kamloops going west that is the problem. Anybody that has pulled a trailer with anything but the most powerful rig knows the experience. Climb, climb, climb all the while checking your gauges.. Driven all through the country and Kamloops is the worst for a steep and continual gradient with no end. Truck drivers HATE Kamloops. Just getting out of Kamloops is worse than the Coquihalla. Worse than Obed summit. Actually the drive to Radium is really bad as well, probably worse. But at least that Kootenay National Park area is beautiful.
    The Kamloops hill is 10 km of maximum 6% grade, with a total elevation gain of 370 m (from 350 m at the bottom to 720 m at the scale). https://www.google.ca/maps/@50.66576...7i13312!8i6656
    The eastbound approach to the Coquihalla summit is 20 km of up to 8.5% grade, with a total elevation gain of 850 m (400 m to 1250 m). http://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/dri...de-profile.pdf
    My experiences are consistent with the numbers. My Outback can pull my boat out of Kamloops at the 100 km/h speed limit with no problems, but I can't do more than 85 km/h on the steepest grades of the eastbound approach to the Coquihalla summit, and I before I added an extra transmission cooler I had to go even slower to avoid overheating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Replacement View Post
    Maybe I'm not one for desert environments but I find Kamloops as butt ugly as the name. just can't stand the place. Osoyoos, no better.

    It would take a shitload of water use to try to have a reasonable garden in Kamloops.

    Either no rain or flashflooding.

    Plus you're dealing with poisonous snakes, spiders, and termites. Terrible place to have a house imo.
    I'm not a big desert fan either. I don't get why Osoyoos is crawling with Lower Mainlanders in the summer when they have to so many nicer places to visit closer to home, and the only reason to go to Kamloops as a tourist is the abundance of cheap motels. However, as a place to live Kamloops probably offers one of the better combinations of reasonably priced housing and reasonable prospects of employment in BC, and any vegetable garden I would find manageable (no more than about 10 m^2) wouldn't require an unreasonable amount of water.

    One doesn't drive the Coquihalla having to stop at stop light and Start trying to accelerate again up a hill. I find the Coke quite easy as you can draft from one hill to the next, its not a continual climb. Kamloops at river is 300m above sea level. Theres a point on highway 5 not far out of town where its already got close to 1000M. That's in incredible climb in a short space and from a standing stop. Add that incredible heat in Kamloops and its bad on radiators and fan belts as well.

    My experience is opposite of yours. I seldom have trouble keeping speed on Coquihalla. But I get to a crawl pulling a trailer on that hill out of Kamloops. Probably because I can build speed and in anticipation of the upcoming climbs on the coke which one can't do from a stopped start in Kamloops. I think that's the major difference and also gridlock traffic up and down that hill. When pulling a trailer nothing more excruciating than bumper to bumper traffic on a crawl going up or down a steep hill
    Last edited by Replacement; 20-05-2017 at 09:12 AM.
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    Place is a nightmare for Truckers
    Agreed.

    Runaway Truck Smashes Into Autos; 5 Dead October 28 1989

    KAMLOOPS, British Columbia (AP) - A flatbed truck loaded

    with steel beams barreled out of control Friday on a steep

    hill, smashing through several vehicles and killing five

    people, authorities and witnesses said.


    Gordon Davies, medical director at Royal Inland Hospital,

    said the truck hit several vehicles before smashing into

    a retaining wall outside the hospital and bursting into

    flames.


    The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said 12 people were hurt

    and 13 vehicles were involved in the accident. Four people

    were admitted to the hospital, one in critical condition,

    Davies said.


    "One station wagon was sheared in half, with the rear half

    under the truck," Davies said.


    Coroner Bob Graham said the man driving the truck, three

    women and a preschool child were killed.


    Witnesses said the truck smashed through a line of cars

    backed up at a stoplight in front of the hospital about

    10:55 a.m.


    "I just don't believe it. I saw him coming and I tried

    to pull out of the way," said David McGregor, who narrowly

    escaped being hit.


    "I looked in my rear-view mirror and saw this huge flatbed

    truck barreling through cars. They were just exploding as

    he hit them," McGregor said. "All I knew is he was going

    really fast and he couldn't stop and he just went through

    like they were Tinker Toys."


    Warren Cameron said he was driving down the hill when he

    looked in his rear-view mirror and saw the truck bearing

    down on him. He managed to change lanes just in time.

    "He missed my rear bumper by inches," Cameron said. "Then

    he hit a pickup truck and killed that lady. Then he hit

    several more cars and dragged one them underneath.

    "Then it exploded. There were bodies all over the place."

    Cameron said rescuers managed to drag one girl, about 3

    years old, from a car just before it blew up.



    Kamloops, at the junction of the North and South Thompson

    rivers, is about 150 miles northeast of Vancouver and 100

    miles north of the U.S. border.
    http://www.tulsaworld.com/news/runaw...984b595de.html
    Last edited by Kitlope; 20-05-2017 at 05:00 AM.
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  12. #12

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    I remember that. Alberta Report, or whatever it was called at the time had a detailed accounting of the driver's actions in that crash. It was a riveting account of a guy speeding out of control trying to avoid hitting people.

    I imagine the worst thing about floods is that it's hard to estimate just how bad one could be and when the worst flood could hit.

  13. #13

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    Yeah, Truckers have a hard time with that hill going either up or down. Not too many entrances to cities contain runaway truck lanes in town. That's pretty disconcerting to see and also that traffic gets backed up in that area. That's unfortunately a disaster waiting to happen and although the Coquihalla has several similar runaway lanes they are not located in gridlock city traffic regions.

    The thing is one expects this type of thing on the Coquihalla and the well publicized elevation changes, road conditions etc are well documented and reported. Everybody recognizes that as a highway involving significant elevation climbs. Most people don't even seem to know about the Highway 5 vertical climb just outside of sprawling Kamloops.

    I remember that tragedy as well. Its why its some white knuckle driving down that hill or up it. Its just a nightmare being backed in traffic when you know tons of trucks are coming down that hill behind you all the time.
    Last edited by Replacement; 20-05-2017 at 08:58 AM.
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  14. #14

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    @ Titanium48

    Just click on the map on highway 5 as it exits Kamloops region. Around 15-20K out of town and the elevation on highway 5 constantly increases changes from 338M around the river to a crazy 1350M summit not far out of town. The exact elevation at Stake lake on highway 5 within 20Km from Kamloops is an insane 1353 meters. higher than Coquihalla Summit. Its the worst climb/hill in the region and hardly gets talked about.

    http://en-ca.topographic-map.com/pla...mloops-377320/

    Just a crazy region to drive in and tons of accidents too.
    Last edited by Replacement; 20-05-2017 at 10:51 AM.
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