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Thread: Is it time to licence and restrict all boats to assigned lakes and rivers

  1. #1

    Default Is it time to licence and restrict all boats to assigned lakes and rivers

    Since we're facing incredibly costly invasive species risks does Alberta have to think about measures to prevent their spread among our bodies of water? So, should anyone with a boat have to restrict its use to a pre-assigned water body.

    i.e. if you have a cabin on pigeon lake, your boat has to stay there. If you have a boat in a city or town you have to get a lake specific license to use it only in that one water body in that season. If you want to move it somewhere else mid season you need to get it cleaned and 'treated'.


    Mussels close in on Alberta irrigation districts
    Posted Nov. 17th, 2016 by Barb Glen

    “If it does get into the upper St. Mary’s or gets into the upper Milk River … it’s a game changer. (There’s no) stopping it from getting into all the irrigation systems and water treatment plants basically from Cardston east to Medicine Hat.”

    Alberta government estimates show invasive mussels could cost the province $75 million in damages annually. The irrigation industry alone could see $8 million in annual costs to combat the mussels.

    http://www.producer.com/2016/11/muss...ion-districts/
    More on costs in general...
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0321195037.htm
    Last edited by KC; 17-11-2016 at 08:28 PM.

  2. #2

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    I think they should try to tackle the problem other ways. In fact boats and boat motors may stop mussels from taking hold as they may like still waters to proliferate.
    Like mosquitoes, they don't like churning water so they don't lay eggs in it. Mussels may not spawn.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    I think they should try to tackle the problem other ways. In fact boats and boat motors may stop mussels from taking hold as they may like still waters to proliferate.
    Like mosquitoes, they don't like churning water so they don't lay eggs in it. Mussels may not spawn.
    You'd need a lot of boats in a lake to make a difference.

  4. #4
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    Default

    ^^^ I think that would be going too far for Alberta while Alberta, BC and Saskatchewan are still free of invasive mussels, but Montana should be considering something like that now. The reservoir where they were found is not a direct threat (it is not upstream of anything in Canada and it is unlikely a boat would get through the international border without being inspected and decontaminated if necessary), but western Montana has St Mary lake (which drains to the Oldman river and could contaminate the entire South Saskatchewan) as well as the Koocanusa reservoir on the Kootenay river.

  5. #5

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    They should find some mussels that carry a fatal disease. Infect the mussels and hope they die off. Or, try to render the males or females sterile although it seems their mating habits are pretty complicated.

    http://molluskconservation.org/MUSSE...roduction.html
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  6. #6

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    ^ good idea.

    Also I would say the time to restrict watercraft to one body of water is long overdue, obviously.
    Let's make Edmonton better.

  7. #7

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    Monitoring update:


    Keeping Invasive Mussels Out of Alberta, One Boat at a Time
    October 15, 2015
    21
    If you are a boat owner in Alberta you have a role to play in protecting our lakes and rivers, as well as our water infrastructure, from infestation by zebra or quagga mussels.

    Zebra and quagga mussels attach to any hard surface and grow like a carpet. They colonize dams and irrigation systems and are a significant physical nuisance for infrastructure. We have over seven thousand kilometers of irrigation canals and pipe in Alberta, all of which could be damaged by an infestation of zebra mussels.

    Quagga mussels on the other hand can also attach to soft surfaces and therefore pose a threat to an even wider set of environments and infrastructure. What’s more, the quagga mussels can survive and reproduce at very low temperatures, which means it will take more than our Alberta winters to scare them away.


    Mussels from inspected boat



    UPDATE (2017/06/02): We have hired 60 boat inspection staff this season and have expanded the boat inspection stations to 11 fixed locations and two roving crews in response to the infestation of a Montana reservoir by invasive mussels. This summer we will monitor about 73 lakes and reservoirs across the province and in addition 22 irrigation canals will also be monitored by Alberta Agriculture and Forestry.

    http://environmentalmonitoring.alber...oat-at-a-time/

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