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Thread: Future threats to Alberta's economic sectors

  1. #1

    Default Future threats to Alberta's economic sectors

    I thought I'd start a thread to look at what potential factors, issues, developments - in the future - might slow or prevent various sectors in Alberta's economy from recovering or thriving in the future.


    Here's one, oil related POS (Piece of Speculation) article:
    When I take a moment to think about it I see that even it doesn't likely property assess the risk because electrics could hit certain high-consumption demands first so the curve could look very different.


    Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

    With all good technologies, there comes a time when buying the alternative no longer makes sense. Think smartphones in the past decade, color TVs in the 1970s, or even gasoline cars in the early 20th century. Predicting the timing of these shifts is difficult, but when it happens, the whole world changes

    ...
    Yesterday, on the first episode of Bloomberg’s new animated series Sooner Than You Think, we calculated the effect of continued 60 percent growth. We found that electric vehicles could displace oil demand of 2 million barrels a day as early as 2023. That would create a glut of oil equivalent to what triggered the 2014 oil crisis.

    ...
    http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-ev-oil-crisis/
    Last edited by KC; 27-08-2016 at 08:16 AM.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    I thought I'd start a thread to look at what potential factors, issues, developments - in the future - might slow or prevent various sectors in Alberta's economy from recovering or thriving in the future.


    Here's one, oil related POS (Piece of Speculation) article:
    When I take a moment to think about it I see that even it doesn't likely property assess the risk because electrics could hit certain high-consumption demands first so the curve could look very different.


    Here’s How Electric Cars Will Cause the Next Oil Crisis

    With all good technologies, there comes a time when buying the alternative no longer makes sense. Think smartphones in the past decade, color TVs in the 1970s, or even gasoline cars in the early 20th century. Predicting the timing of these shifts is difficult, but when it happens, the whole world changes

    ...
    Yesterday, on the first episode of Bloomberg’s new animated series Sooner Than You Think, we calculated the effect of continued 60 percent growth. We found that electric vehicles could displace oil demand of 2 million barrels a day as early as 2023. That would create a glut of oil equivalent to what triggered the 2014 oil crisis.

    ...
    http://www.bloomberg.com/features/2016-ev-oil-crisis/
    Prepare for increased electricity prices when this becomes a viable option. Not only cause power companies can and will get you just cause but also due to the fact that they'll have to improve things like transformers in neighborhoods as they were never designed to handle the extra load that people plugging in cars at the same time will demand.

  3. #3

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    ^I'm worried about the impact of the carbon tax / accelerated coal phase out. You would have to be crazy doing a major manufacturing or processing expansion in Alberta right now, knowing that one of your key critical inputs, electricity, may triple in price just like it did in Ontario (which is killing manufacturing there). That's just not competitive against the US and China where economic polices aren't being driven by eco nuts (they talk the talk, but are smart enough to not implement the talk, unless it impacts a foreign country like Keystone XL).
    Last edited by moahunter; 29-08-2016 at 04:56 PM.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moahunter View Post
    ^I'm worried about the impact of the carbon tax / accelerated coal phase out. You would have to be crazy doing a major manufacturing or processing expansion in Alberta right now, knowing that one of your key critical inputs, electricity, may triple in price just like it did in Ontario (which is killing manufacturing there). That's just not competitive against the US and China where economic polices aren't being driven by eco nuts (they talk the talk, but are smart enough to not implement the talk, unless it impacts a foreign country like Keystone XL).
    And what insight can you recommend as a path forward?

  5. #5

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    Any threats that may be flying under the radar?

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