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Thread: Humbly asking your advice

  1. #1

    Default Humbly asking your advice

    Good day all,

    My name is Tye
    & I am a 1st time entreprenuer,

    I have spent the last 14 years working as a custom fabricator.
    With a long term goal of building a wide range of skills I moved around in my trade.
    Doing everything from oilfeild support products (Portable offices, Gen-sets, Skidshacks, Trailers, etc)
    Down to TIG welding aluminum aircraft parts. (mainly exhaust parts)

    In trying to find a way to apply my skills in a way that is more rewarding & to also fill what I see as a hole in our local marketplace,
    I have started a business offering industrial design & custom fabrication services.
    I have also partnered up with another fabricator, allowing us to get into a larger workshop, expanding our production capabilities.
    He specializes in wrought iron railing, gates & security bars.

    What in your opinions, is the best way to get our business in front of the right people on a limited budget?

    Any advice or opinions are welcome as my experience is mainly on the fabrication & production management side.

    Thanks in advance.
    Tye.

  2. #2

    Default

    ^Edmonton is interesting, because a lot of the more successful companies keep a very low profile, so it isn't easy to find them. Id suggest working on your network, get involved in things like Nisku Business Association, attend trade events, try to meet and greet as many people as you can, and build your Linkedin profile with each person you meet. Your accountant or lawyer might have connections as well. The good thing about Edmonton is once you make a connection, decisions / jobs can happen fast, and it's possible to grow rapidly if you do a great job. Good luck.
    Last edited by moahunter; 18-07-2016 at 07:09 PM.

  3. #3
    I'd rather C2E than work!
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Strathearn, Edmonton
    Posts
    4,089

    Default

    You can cold call some of the construction companies ask to talk to their estimating department, get on their bid lists.
    All it takes is one yes and one successful job and they keep calling back and your name starts to get out there.
    I don't know about contacting some architects, seems like some of your possible work is custom decorative or artistic.

  4. #4

    Default

    Get used to hearing no when it comes to cold calls and don't let that negatively effect you. Keep in mind the one person telling you no may not be the decision maker. Go above their head if they are setting up road blocks. Sometimes getting past the secretary is an issue... Research their company, ask for the person you think you need like you have a meeting, call other locations for information you aren't getting from people, drop names when you do this so they let their guard down a bit. The bigger the company the harder it is to get in front of the right people.. It can pay off to contact regular employees first to get a run down on who's who.

    I did a lot of cold calling for a friends start up company for a while. In one case I got the face to face meeting with a ceo of a multi billion dollar a year company because I had the same first name as their meeting. Sometimes it's just about luck... Other times it's persistence. I had one company that knew me by name because I would call them so often.

  5. #5
    I'd rather C2E than work!
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Strathearn, Edmonton
    Posts
    4,089

    Default

    If there is a business association for your type of work that could be helpful as well.

  6. #6

    Default

    Thanks for the replies guys.

    Nice to hear that I'm at least pointed in the right direction.

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