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Thread: Best Before Dates

  1. #1

    Default Best Before Dates

    I always thought this was a waste of money and a drain on an economy. However all this overproduction and waste might be of very rare value someday should we suffer a major continental drought.

    What does the "best before" date on food packaging really mean? | The Current with Anna Maria Tremonti | CBC Radio

    "Ever had milk the day after the date? Scares the hell out of you, doesn't it? The spoon is trembling as it comes out of the bowl. It's after the day, we're taking a big chance (as though the spoon were talking) I smell it, you smell it, what is it supposed to smell like. Smelled like milk to me".
    Comedian Jerry Seinfeld

    http://www.cbc.ca/thecurrent/episode...g-really-mean/



    Harvard study finds food expiration labels are misleading | Reuters

    "(Reuters) - Americans throw out billions of pounds of food every year because they falsely believe "sell-by" and "best-before" dates on package labels indicate food safety, researchers have found...."


    http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/...98H15F20130918
    Last edited by KC; 04-10-2013 at 10:07 AM.

  2. #2
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    Some foods that are very high in salt or sugars for example honey last almost forever, others like raw seafood a day or two.

    A good site to check out is ...
    http://www.eatbydate.com/

  3. #3

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    Some friends are extreme examples of that.. family of 4 - two adults, two under the age of 4.

    Shop at Costco, buy food en masse, throw away food as soon as it hits its expiry date because "Best Before."

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    Yes, it depends entirely on the food. You don't want to be eating old seafood unless you're an expert in storing the stuff and even then. But I find milk sometimes goes bad before the expiration and sometimes lasts after. It's the sniff test which is authoritative here. Canned goods may become "less good" but unless the can starts to look like it's ready to explode, it's probably perfectly edible. Etc. Etc.

    I grew up in a poor household. If something was edible, you ate it.

    Eve

  5. #5
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    For the most part, the only product I never mess with regarding the best before date, is milk. Sometimes a couple days after the expiry it may still be good, but I'm not gonna take that gamble.

    Otherwise if it is within reason out of date, I will usually eat it.

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    Top_Dawg doesn't eat much dairy, but he's careful with the little he does eat.

    Nevertheless, the only time he ever got food poisoning was from canned soup.

    Woke up in the middle of the night and just barely got his snout in the shitter.



    Violent pukefest.

    Borked up enough to fill a KFC bucket.

    To boot, he had to go to the rock quarry in the morning to get something done, despite feelin' like ten pounds of **** in a five pound bag.

    Did it and focked off 'round mid-morning.

    Had a few suds and that seemed to fix'im up.

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    I've had milk in the fridge that was a couple of weeks past the expiry date and there was nothing wrong with it. Other times, it's gone bad within a week. It depends on the fridge temperature and the room temperature as well. I think if a room is warm, the fridge works harder but may be a little warmer inside than if it were cooler in the kitchen.

  8. #8

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    Switched to almond milk a few years ago, no more spoiled milk problems.

    I laugh at expiry dates on things like eggs and yogurt - they're usually good for months after. It's absurd to me that there are expiry dates on things like chips, and it saddens me knowing that retailers throw them out because people won't buy them. As if a Dorito goes bad a day after the best before date.
    "Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from religious conviction" - Blaise Pascal

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    Though I did open up a tube of plain Greek yogurt only to find a thick film of dark green mould on it. I didn't even know that was possible. I didn't even check the best before date though because it seemed irrelevant.

    And I have eaten eggs that were months in the fridge. As long as they don't behave strangely in the frypan they're fine.

    Eve

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    i would think best before dates are probably more for legal litigation reasons.
    ya the stuff could last longer but are companies going to risk a lawsuit over it?

    also have to add that best before dates are only for unopened products, after opening all bets are off.
    be offended! figure out why later...

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    It's my understanding that Best Before Date is what it is...the date up to when the product is in its freshest and best state. It isn't necessarily the dates when products automatically start rotting and changing color, though that may be true for daily and meat products. For canned products I think its more like how long before the can itself may start to decompose.
    “You have to dream big. If we want to be a little city, we dream small. If we want to be a big city, we dream big, and this is a big idea.” - Mayor Stephen Mandel, 02/22/2012

  12. #12

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    Of course, those in business disregard the rules... Yummy.

    I'm glad I like my meat well done.



    CBC INVESTIGATES
    Grocery store secrets: Best-before dates tampered, workers claim
    Marketplace investigation found grocery store tricks to sell old food
    By Megan Griffith-Greene / Marketplace, CBC News Posted: Nov 06, 2015 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Nov 06, 2015 7:41 AM ET

    "One insider also says his store took meat that had gone brown from sitting out, and dipped it in blood to make it look redder. Others said they would take mouldy fruit off custard tarts, replace it and glaze it to make it look fresh.

    In each of these cases, food was put out with new best-before dates that significantly extended the shelf life.

    Food treated this way can harbour microbes that can make you sick, says Keith Warriner, a microbiologist at the University of Guelph. ..."

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/loblaw...ring-1.3306395


    Older story out of Kelowna. Interesting about Goof Off - I'll have yo get some.

    "We now have a specialized stamp that looks more like the manufacturers’ stamps,” he says."
    ...
    "She says it was made clear to her that nothing was to be thrown out, no matter how old."
    http://globalnews.ca/news/1893039/ke...before-labels/
    Last edited by KC; 06-11-2015 at 08:17 AM.

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    For the most part they're stale dates marking when the quality of the product may start to decline. I typically only worry about meats, seafood, and mayonaise. The only milk in the house is used by the wife for her coffee and the kids for their cereal, so I let them worry about it.

    "For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, and wrong"

  14. #14

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    ^Yup, "Best Before" denotes when the freshness starts to decline, not when the product is unsafe to eat. "Expiration" dates denote the latter.

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/best-b...know-1.3006858

  15. #15

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    A few generations on and all the lessons of the Great Depression are long forgotten. We won't even talk about the environmental impact -which is like digging ditches and filling them in again - or worse. Create plastic and other packaging, fill it up with food - then send it to the landfill.


    Here's how much food Walmart throws away over 12 days

    Marketplace finds discarded food well before the best-before date; retailer calls it unfit to consume
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani

    On one trip, Marketplace staff found 12 waist-high bins full of food. After Walmart was contacted, it locked up the bins behind the stores where the food was fo


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/mark...aste-1.3814719


    A $31B problem: How Canada sucks at reducing food waste

    Other countries crack down on discards, so why are we so far behind?
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani, CBC News Posted: Oct 26, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 26, 2016 5:07 AM ET

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cana...aste-1.3813965


    Something here for Alberta?

    Tax credit helps farmers donate, but lots of food still wasted
    'Are we anywhere near where we need to be? No,' said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia
    By Stephanie vanKampen, CBC News Posted: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT Last Updated: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT


    Nova Scotia's largest network of food banks has seen both a jump in the number of farmers donating and in donations of fresh produce, a spokeswoman says.

    More farmers likely are taking advantage of a new tax credit established by the province in May, said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia.

    The tax credit gives a farm 25 per cent of the market value of all fresh produce donated to organizations, such as Feed Nova Scotia, which supplies food banks across the province.
    ...
    Melvin suggested farmers could work directly with charitable groups to bring the cost of food down for food banks, while giving farmers a market for their product.

    For example, if a food bank needed to buy produce, it could go to a farmer directly and pay a fraction of the price the grocery store charges
    ...

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...lvin-1.3804344

    Makes one wonder if the cost of food and hence the cost of living in the north and in remote communities couldn't be a LOT cheaper if some sensible coordination was used. Further, maybe the government's northern allowances could then be reduced.
    Last edited by KC; 28-10-2016 at 10:42 PM.

  16. #16
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    Been keeping tabs on this. Pathetic. At home, I lose my mind when I throw out the last little bit of a cheese smokie.

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    A few generations on and all the lessons of the Great Depression are long forgotten. We won't even talk about the environmental impact -which is like digging ditches and filling them in again - or worse. Create plastic and other packaging, fill it up with food - then send it to the landfill.


    Here's how much food Walmart throws away over 12 days

    Marketplace finds discarded food well before the best-before date; retailer calls it unfit to consume
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani

    On one trip, Marketplace staff found 12 waist-high bins full of food. After Walmart was contacted, it locked up the bins behind the stores where the food was fo


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/mark...aste-1.3814719


    A $31B problem: How Canada sucks at reducing food waste

    Other countries crack down on discards, so why are we so far behind?
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani, CBC News Posted: Oct 26, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 26, 2016 5:07 AM ET

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cana...aste-1.3813965


    Something here for Alberta?

    Tax credit helps farmers donate, but lots of food still wasted
    'Are we anywhere near where we need to be? No,' said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia
    By Stephanie vanKampen, CBC News Posted: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT Last Updated: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT


    Nova Scotia's largest network of food banks has seen both a jump in the number of farmers donating and in donations of fresh produce, a spokeswoman says.

    More farmers likely are taking advantage of a new tax credit established by the province in May, said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia.

    The tax credit gives a farm 25 per cent of the market value of all fresh produce donated to organizations, such as Feed Nova Scotia, which supplies food banks across the province.
    ...
    Melvin suggested farmers could work directly with charitable groups to bring the cost of food down for food banks, while giving farmers a market for their product.

    For example, if a food bank needed to buy produce, it could go to a farmer directly and pay a fraction of the price the grocery store charges
    ...

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...lvin-1.3804344

    Makes one wonder if the cost of food and hence the cost of living in the north and in remote communities couldn't be a LOT cheaper if some sensible coordination was used. Further, maybe the government's northern allowances could then be reduced.
    I'm not blowing a horn for Walmart but I think these investigations sometimes just look at stuff and take it at face value. For all they know some of that food in the bins could have been compromised by a spill or split open when fallen off a shelf or unloaded from a wagon. In the case of lettuce or other types of veggies and fruit. If they are sitting in a cold place and they freeze some of that produce just wilts or shrivels. Maybe the food was in the bins before the best before date but that does not say it was just thrown away for no reason.
    "The man who does not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read." –Mark Twain

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gemini View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by KC View Post
    A few generations on and all the lessons of the Great Depression are long forgotten. We won't even talk about the environmental impact -which is like digging ditches and filling them in again - or worse. Create plastic and other packaging, fill it up with food - then send it to the landfill.


    Here's how much food Walmart throws away over 12 days

    Marketplace finds discarded food well before the best-before date; retailer calls it unfit to consume
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani

    On one trip, Marketplace staff found 12 waist-high bins full of food. After Walmart was contacted, it locked up the bins behind the stores where the food was fo


    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/mark...aste-1.3814719


    A $31B problem: How Canada sucks at reducing food waste

    Other countries crack down on discards, so why are we so far behind?
    By Melissa Mancini, Nelisha Vellani, CBC News Posted: Oct 26, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 26, 2016 5:07 AM ET

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/cana...aste-1.3813965


    Something here for Alberta?

    Tax credit helps farmers donate, but lots of food still wasted
    'Are we anywhere near where we need to be? No,' said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia
    By Stephanie vanKampen, CBC News Posted: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT Last Updated: Oct 14, 2016 7:15 AM AT


    Nova Scotia's largest network of food banks has seen both a jump in the number of farmers donating and in donations of fresh produce, a spokeswoman says.

    More farmers likely are taking advantage of a new tax credit established by the province in May, said Karen Theriault of Feed Nova Scotia.

    The tax credit gives a farm 25 per cent of the market value of all fresh produce donated to organizations, such as Feed Nova Scotia, which supplies food banks across the province.
    ...
    Melvin suggested farmers could work directly with charitable groups to bring the cost of food down for food banks, while giving farmers a market for their product.

    For example, if a food bank needed to buy produce, it could go to a farmer directly and pay a fraction of the price the grocery store charges
    ...

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...lvin-1.3804344

    Makes one wonder if the cost of food and hence the cost of living in the north and in remote communities couldn't be a LOT cheaper if some sensible coordination was used. Further, maybe the government's northern allowances could then be reduced.
    I'm not blowing a horn for Walmart but I think these investigations sometimes just look at stuff and take it at face value. For all they know some of that food in the bins could have been compromised by a spill or split open when fallen off a shelf or unloaded from a wagon. In the case of lettuce or other types of veggies and fruit. If they are sitting in a cold place and they freeze some of that produce just wilts or shrivels. Maybe the food was in the bins before the best before date but that does not say it was just thrown away for no reason.
    Watch the ?Market Place episode. It's all thrown out for a reason. I.e. One orange in a bag is bad and the whole bag goes. It's efficient.

  19. #19

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    I work in food retail, so I could go into a department by department presentation of why and how food gets thrown out at retail.

    It boils down, however, to four things: (1) food is perishable; (2) customers won't buy deteriorated food; (3) charity won't accept it; (4) ordering less means allowing visible holes in the displays, and entails more customer complaints.

    This is just the reality. And then you think of the waste in the backstage from harvest to wholesale delivery...

    Food in Canada is cheap and disposable. Deplore it all you like, but most people simply will not accept anything other than the freshest and best-class stuff in whichever store they shop at.

    And that's not a complaint against anyone. It's just how things work.
    Last edited by AShetsen; 29-10-2016 at 12:25 AM.

  20. #20

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    im sorry but ive done a lot of volunteer work at different drop in centers around the city and they regularly pick up this non desirable food.

    Most of it is undesirable bread and other baked goods... if this could be expanded they would take it 100 percent.

  21. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    im sorry but ive done a lot of volunteer work at different drop in centers around the city and they regularly pick up this non desirable food.

    Most of it is undesirable bread and other baked goods... if this could be expanded they would take it 100 percent.
    Food banks do not take expired bread or baked goods. And that's where a lot of the shrink comes from. They do not take wilted produce. They certainly don't take meat trimmings. There's most of the daily retail waste.
    Last edited by AShetsen; 29-10-2016 at 01:26 AM.

  22. #22

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    In this latest Marketplace investigation there were bins and bins full of food. Much of it was unexpired* which was the point of their show.

    Moreover, they are doing more here for the 'conservative' movement and economic efficiency than hundreds of right leaning politicians producing reams of paper and propaganda about this or that little tax or expenditure ever does. It should be debated in depth and sensible solutions found to reduce all this waste.



    *Though I have a problem with calling something "bad" just a day after a "best before" date. Is it still not "good" or "great"?

    If a best before date is going to be used, a second 'discard by' date should be required in order to reduce this truly massive cost to our society. The current practices are simply moronic and the people that think something that is no longer "best" and so landfill the item, are idiots.)
    Last edited by KC; 29-10-2016 at 09:24 AM.

  23. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by AShetsen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    im sorry but ive done a lot of volunteer work at different drop in centers around the city and they regularly pick up this non desirable food.

    Most of it is undesirable bread and other baked goods... if this could be expanded they would take it 100 percent.
    Food banks do not take expired bread or baked goods. And that's where a lot of the shrink comes from. They do not take wilted produce. They certainly don't take meat trimmings. There's most of the daily retail waste.
    Did i mention a food bank? There are places that would gladly take nearly expired food. The one drop in center ive done a lot of work with purposely stops in at stores near them to get any food they can for the homeless.

  24. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AShetsen View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by gwill211 View Post
    im sorry but ive done a lot of volunteer work at different drop in centers around the city and they regularly pick up this non desirable food.

    Most of it is undesirable bread and other baked goods... if this could be expanded they would take it 100 percent.
    Food banks do not take expired bread or baked goods. And that's where a lot of the shrink comes from. They do not take wilted produce. They certainly don't take meat trimmings. There's most of the daily retail waste.
    Did i mention a food bank? There are places that would gladly take nearly expired food. The one drop in center ive done a lot of work with purposely stops in at stores near them to get any food they can for the homeless.
    Well, Walmart realized the perception, if not realizing the actual reality, of what they were doing was so bad that they say they are going to do something about it.

    Of course it could just be a ploy like, I believe it was Tim Hortons plus other coffee shops, pulled by saying they were recycling when they were actually just landfilling cups.


    MARKETPLACE UPDATE

    Coffee cups: 3 months later, are they being recycled at Tim Hortons and Starbucks?
    Marketplace finds questions remain over whether coffee cups end up in landfill
    By Megan Griffith-Greene / Marketplace, CBC News Posted: Jan 29, 2016 5:00 AM ET Last Updated: Jan 29, 2016 5:03 AM ET


    After a CBC Marketplace investigation last fall revealed that cups collected by some Starbucks and Tim Hortons stores for recycling are being sent to landfill, questions remain about what the coffee chains are actually doing with all those used containers.

    And further investigation raises doubt about whether Wasteco, a private garbage hauler hired by the chains for some Toronto stores, actually recycles coffee cups at all.

    "Coffee cups will not be recycled," a salesman from Wasteco who was not aware he was speaking with a journalist told a Marketplace producer. "That's the reality, dear. That is real."

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/coff...ucks-1.3424361
    Last edited by KC; 29-10-2016 at 06:20 PM.

  25. #25

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    ...

    The towering food waste problem
    The food waste problem isn't going away. So what are grocers doing to remedy this widespread-and costly-dilemma? And what's causing it in the first place?
    By Jered Stuffco/Illustration by Pete Ryan | November 10, 2015



    Kalmanovitch, owner of Edmonton’s Earth General Store, a small shop that sells organics and other environmentally conscious products, speaks to a common industry mentality that simply doesn’t make sense to him:

    “The industry has this idea that if there are five mouldy bananas in a case, they’ll turn around to the supplier, make a claim for it and throw the case out,” he says.

    That thinking doesn’t fly at his store, which is staffed by what Kalmanovitch calls “anti- wasters.” Rather than toss less-than-perfect food, the store hosts dinners cooked with scraps alongside the city’s Alder Food Security Society as part of its efforts to cut waste.

    http://www.canadiangrocer.com/top-st...-problem-59481
    Interesting (see below). It's not just an environmental waste. Financially, it's a massive missalllocation of capital.

    What a waste - Macleans.ca
    http://www.macleans.ca/society/life/what-a-waste/
    Last edited by KC; 29-10-2016 at 07:07 PM.

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