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Old 30-10-2013, 02:34 PM   #1
Sonic Death Monkey
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Default Alberta is getting another area code: 825

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgar...code-1.2288581

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Just four years after a third prefix was introduced to Alberta, the province is getting a fourth. The CRTC announced Wednesday that starting April 9, 2016, new telephone numbers anywhere in the province may be preceded by 825.

The Canadian Numbering Administrator, which regulates area codes, says the current 403, 780 and 587 prefixes will run out of numbers by July 2016.
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Old 30-10-2013, 03:35 PM   #2
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I wonder how the Pizza 73 jingle would go?

Dial 8-2-5-4-7-3-7-3-7-3...
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Old 30-10-2013, 03:59 PM   #3
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Why are they not doing Calgary and Edmonton area codes...
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Old 30-10-2013, 04:03 PM   #4
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The better question is, why is "long distance" even a thing anymore?
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Old 30-10-2013, 04:05 PM   #5
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^ its really not... we still need 10 digit numbers
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Old 30-10-2013, 04:48 PM   #6
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will they also increase the dial opportunity - auto hang up span at the same time?
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Old 30-10-2013, 05:58 PM   #7
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I already get treated like a 2nd class citizen with a 587 number. I feel extra bad for the 825ers.
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Old 30-10-2013, 11:54 PM   #8
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What was the point of the 780 changeover when new area codes come in that are province wide?
I hear you about the 587 thing.
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Old 31-10-2013, 12:11 AM   #9
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I could be wrong, but I think it was simply an old disruptive way of doing things (780) was discontinued in favor of a better, non-disruptive way of doing things (587).
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Old 31-10-2013, 12:29 AM   #10
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The funny thing is that while the old changeover of 403 phone numbers was disruptive (and discriminatorily costly) introducing the new numbers into northern or southern AB only would not have been disruptive.
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Old 31-10-2013, 07:24 AM   #11
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What happens when North America / Caribbean runs out? There are only 999 codes aren't there? Oh, I googled, we should be OK:

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Here some basic math on the numbers available. According to the FCC, it turns out that each area code in the US has approximately 8 million numbers available. Currently there are about 660 area codes available in North America, with over 300 areas currently in use. Thus, there is approximately 5.3 billion potential numbers available, based on 660 area codes. Thats a lot of numbers.

So why the problem. The problem in the past has been that telco providers bought telephone numbers in 10,000 blocks. Thus if a provider only used 100 numbers, there were 9,900 numbers that went unused. Well, they finally got smart and pooled the unused numbers. Therefore, the short answer is that we are not in immediate danger of running out of phone numbers. Although I still question why we haven’t moved to a more DNS-based structure to deal with these hard to remember, 10 digit numbers, that in many ways are very personal and private to us.
http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/sunnyah...phone-numbers/

Last edited by moahunter; 31-10-2013 at 07:26 AM..
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Old 31-10-2013, 08:53 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by edmonton daily photo View Post
^ its really not... we still need 10 digit numbers
I understand that we need more area codes. But you specifically asked why not have Edmonton and Calgary area codes. My point was that we shouldn't need separate area codes, because long distance should be a thing of the past. Which it still isn't.
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Old 31-10-2013, 09:31 AM   #13
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^ Regardless of how calls are charged, I still think it would be useful to have a correlation between area codes and geographical areas. Overlays only make sense to me once a single city or metropolitan area needs more than one area code.
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Old 31-10-2013, 09:38 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Marcel Petrin View Post
The better question is, why is "long distance" even a thing anymore?
One of my work irritants happens when I send reminder faxes to various facilities. I don't have an internal map of which small towns are "local" and which are "long distance". So I will send a fax dialing "1" and the ***** robot will scold "That number is a local number, you don't have to dial "1"". Well, if the system knows it's a local number, it knows where the fax is going. Why can't it just dial the wretched thing and send my fax on its way?

I agree. The difference between long distance and local for most of us is fading fast especially with 10-digit local dialing.

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Old 31-10-2013, 09:47 AM   #15
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The whole point to dialing 1 is to acknowledge that you will be charged long distance
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Old 31-10-2013, 09:52 AM   #16
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Except when I dial an unnecessary "1" then I am still acknowledging the willingness to pay the charge even though no charge will in fact happen.

Because of the nature of my work, the majority of my faxes and calls are long distance.

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(who remembers when long distance calls were a Really Big Deal and people would be pulled out of meetings to answer them.)
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Old 31-10-2013, 10:22 AM   #17
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Actually, I'm pretty sure that at least with a land line if you dial a 1 unnecessarily, the call won't go through either. Cell phones work a bit differently with the whole "1" and long distance dialing.
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Old 31-10-2013, 12:33 PM   #18
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Forget area codes, it's annoying that we can't "call" email addresses, Facebook profiles, etc as easily as a phone number. Who needs a phone number? People should be calling Chmilz, not some arbitrary number associated to Chmilz. Luckily things like Skype, Facetime, and a multitude of other services are working towards that end, but it's not good enough.
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Old 31-10-2013, 12:34 PM   #19
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^^ It's a carrier setting to allow the call to continue with a warning or not to proceed and force you to redial. The wired phone system and dialing rules are certainly old fashion and havent changed much in 30 years outside of adding new area codes, but it wont ever change...more likelyjust die off at some point (land lines at least... ). Eventually sip and voip will take over

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ten-digit_dialing

Quote:
"Standard" dialing[edit]

Traditionally, after the advent of area codes, the phone system allows callers to dial only the local portion of the phone number they wanted to reach, as long as the called number was in the same area code as that of the caller. For example, a person whose full national phone number was 212-555-7890 was able to call a number located at 212-555-3456 by simply dialing 555-3456. The phone system infers that the desired number was in the same area code, and connects the call accordingly. This is now known retrospectively as 7-digit dialing.
In this case, it is only necessary to dial the area code for a domestic call when the area code of the called number was different from that of the calling number. The phone system requires the caller to dial a "1" before the area code and number, to indicate to the phone system that the call will require a connection to another area, as trunk prefix.
"1" is also the country code for the North American Numbering Plan including United States and Canada, and therefore must likewise be dialed before the area code for international calls made to these countries.
Typically such calls were long distance calls. It used to be that a call to a different area code was by definition a long-distance call, but the significant growth in the number of area codes – and the shrinking of the areas they occupy – since that time has invalidated this assumption.
In Canada and some regions of the United States, dialing a "1" before an area code where the outgoing call is in the same service area results in an automated recording indicating that the call being made is local and a "1" is not necessary, even if the area codes are different. This is common in areas where overlays are being used. Phone companies have also warned that dialing "1" when it is unnecessary could result in long distance charges being made even when they otherwise would not have been charged.

Last edited by Medwards; 31-10-2013 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 31-10-2013, 05:08 PM   #20
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I remember when long distance was expensive and people would employ strategies to reduce costs. Someone would yell out, "John, long distance call," and John would run to the phone.

Or, people would arrange in advance that they'd call collect for Mary upon arriving at a destination. Mary was a made-up name and they'd refuse the call, but would get the message.

I also remember when you couldn't own your own phone. They were all rented. My dad got his hands on one and installed it illegally, swearing us to secrecy. I'm old.
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Old 31-10-2013, 05:21 PM   #21
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Anyone remember party lines? We still had them in the country back in the eighties; it was one of my mother's favourite pass-times to spy on the neighbours's conversations
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Old 31-10-2013, 05:30 PM   #22
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Anyone remember party lines? We still had them in the country back in the eighties; it was one of my mother's favourite pass-times to spy on the neighbours's conversations
When I was growing up out past Stony Plain we had one, or I guess technically half of one.
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Old 31-10-2013, 05:35 PM   #23
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That was still in used up to late 80S. If you wanted gossip, you just pick the phone and listen in on the neighbors lol. I didn't live in the rural but had lots of fiends that did.
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Old 01-11-2013, 01:56 AM   #24
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I already feel sorry for my friends with 587. Whenever you go to a store that asks for your number (safeway, princess auto) the cashiers always punch in 780 without asking. Must get annoying to have to correct them every time.

And some stores still haven't updated their systems to 10 digits. I was returning something to Canadian Tire the other day and their computers still use 7 digit numbers.
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Old 01-11-2013, 03:38 AM   #25
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There was a discussion in some other thread here about the practicality of owning a land line in the ever increasing wireless world.

Disregarding the monthly costs (ie. if you can afford a land line AND a cell phone), how often do folks communicate through a land line versus their cell/smart phone/tablet?

My guess is 90% of all personal communication is done through wireless. I know when I got a cell, gradually everyone that mattered in my life called my cell. Conversely I call/text my friends and family's cell number, heck I don't even remember their home numbers.

Just like the answering machine and the pay phone, eventually the land line will become obsolete. The only usage currently would be for commercial and government communication.

My point is it would not be necessary to add a new area codes, if you can free up "white pages" phone numbers and apply it to your cell number.
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Old 01-11-2013, 06:53 AM   #26
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I'm quite surprised on how fast after getting 587 area code that they need to get yet another.

For as long as I can remember, it was 403 and 780. Guess it just shows how fast Alberta is growing.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:12 AM   #27
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The main argument raised for keeping a landline at home is robustness. It stays working during a power outage and does not get swamped if too many people try using it all at once.

On the other hand during power outages my phone still gives me access to the Internet so I can find out what's happening, cell coverage and capacity is rising, and phone battery life is getting very long and not hard to conserve.

I figure eventually landlines will primarily be for businesses where people need a phone on their desk.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:29 AM   #28
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Another thing to consider is that phone numbers are used for a lot more 'behind the scenes' than just providing a dial tone for a client.

Virtually every hard-wired internet connection is associated with a directory number of some sort. They're not all dialable though. It's just how the system was built, and it would be prohibitively expensive for any company, let alone all of them, to revamp in order to free up previously in-use numbers.
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:48 AM   #29
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I still use my land line for my interwebs connection at home. I also keep it for personal info purposes - by giving out my land line number instead of my cell # to various companies, my land line gets all the robocalls and telemarketers! My friends and family contact me via cell #
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Old 01-11-2013, 08:56 AM   #30
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An 825 number would suck big time, people would think you have one of those free call 800 numbers, or worse yet, that you work for a telemarketer.
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Old 01-11-2013, 10:52 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Alex.L View Post
Another thing to consider is that phone numbers are used for a lot more 'behind the scenes' than just providing a dial tone for a client.

Virtually every hard-wired internet connection is associated with a directory number of some sort. They're not all dialable though. It's just how the system was built, and it would be prohibitively expensive for any company, let alone all of them, to revamp in order to free up previously in-use numbers.
So what exactly would make this more than just a software and accounting change? Our allocation of phone numbers is obviously very inefficient, as a home landline, personal cell, work landline and work cell for every single Albertan would only require two area codes worth of numbers (16 million).
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:07 AM   #32
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Not every number that falls under an area code is usable (think 780-911-xxxx). That doesn't exist. I believe the same goes for 780-800, 866, 411, 311, 211, blah blah blah). So the number is considerably less than 8 million per area code.

It would be a software change, but that's a lot more complicated than it sounds. It's not like adding 2 extra digits to the year so things don't crash in the year 2000. It would mean reprogramming millions of customers' in literally dozens of internal systems per company in addition to re-engineering all of those programs so that they recognize and work with whatever new indicator is chosen. Literally millions and millions of dollars worth of programming.

The less expensive, less intrusive, less of a pain in the *** option is very clearly just adding another area code.

If we could go back in time and change how the telcos allocate phone numbers and how they bill, provision and provide service to clients, I would be all over that. Unfortunately that's not realistic at all...so this is how it is.
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Old 01-11-2013, 11:39 AM   #33
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Originally Posted by Titanium48 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex.L View Post
Another thing to consider is that phone numbers are used for a lot more 'behind the scenes' than just providing a dial tone for a client.

Virtually every hard-wired internet connection is associated with a directory number of some sort. They're not all dialable though. It's just how the system was built, and it would be prohibitively expensive for any company, let alone all of them, to revamp in order to free up previously in-use numbers.
So what exactly would make this more than just a software and accounting change? Our allocation of phone numbers is obviously very inefficient, as a home landline, personal cell, work landline and work cell for every single Albertan would only require two area codes worth of numbers (16 million).
Not every number is in use in any area codes. Phone companies buy up blocks of numbers for their use and then assign numbers out of those blocks to their customers. Some cases, telcos buy up blocks of numbers for certain areas/groups/businesses, but those areas may never use all those numbers, but those numbers are reserved for a area/group/business and can't be touched, even though they are not in use. For example, my work is expanding, and we ran out of numbers (we had 780-xxx-3400, 780-xxx-3500, 3600, 3700), so we bought xxx-2900 as well, but we only use the first 10 of those numbers so far in the 2900 series... but the rest are allocated to us for future use....

Also, use of telephone numbers has skyrocketed in the past couple of decades, and even more so recently with the coming of the mobility age. Smart Phones, tablets, laptops all can have sim card in them, and if you want data over 3g/lte, you need a phone number as well.

I myself have a cell phone and work phone, and that's it.... I consider my case fairly rare.

Others I know have a fax number, home number, cell number, number for their 3g data plan on their tablet, an on-call cell phone for work, and a work number.

Other not so commonly known uses of phone numbers, security systems, some cctv systems at remote locations, data lines for meter reads, and even some newer cars have built in 3g/lte receivers... those will need numbers too in order to send data over those networks...
Hotels all have various numbers in all their rooms, and then theres meeting rooms and conference lines in every business. Receptionist phone numbers, waiting room phones, etc etc etc

Last edited by Medwards; 01-11-2013 at 11:46 AM..
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Old 02-11-2013, 03:06 AM   #34
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I've also noticed more and more medium and large-sized companies opting to get rid of central office number with extensions controlled by a receptionist / computer, in favour of individual numbers for every office and cubicle. I'm sure that eats up a bunch of numbers.

Although I thought the days of telecoms buying up big blocks of numbers was in the past now though. I may be wrong about that. I just thought they had moved on to pooling numbers.
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