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Heritage and History There are literally dozens of museums, large and small, that tell the history of Edmonton and area yet you rarely see anything on the forum about them. This forum is C2E's attempt to fix that error. History is the foundation we build our future on and our community, like a home, needs a strong foundation to last. Rather than allow it to be overwhelmed, ignored or left to the persistent few lets create a section where it has it's own voice. Working with the area Museums and Edmonton Heritage Council C2E could create a history/heritage section that would give voice and story to the amazing and exciting history of Edmonton and allow smaller museums to have a voice and promote themselves to the community.


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Old 09-04-2012, 12:57 AM   #1
North Guy66
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Default This Day in Journal History

When the Edmonton Journal revamped their style recently, it introduced a new feature on page A2 called This Day in Journal history. It reprints a news story on this particular day that happened decades ago.

I love this feauture because it brings back memories and recalls Edmonton's history.

I will start with April 8, 1963:

Quote:
$11 flights to Calgary

Pacific Western Airlines’ air-bus service between Edmonton and Calgary costs travellers $11 one-way.

The new PWA service offered a minimum of frills for the passengers.
They had to carry their own luggage aboard, buy tickets during the one-hour flight from a ticket agent/cabin attendant, and move quickly through a 10-minute airport check-in time.

PWA flights departed from Edmonton Municipal Airport.

Officials said the reduction in driving time and check-in time for travellers would reduce serious objections to air travel.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/trave...546/story.html
If it costs $11 to fly to Calgary, imagine how less the cost of gasoline was back in 1963??
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Old 09-04-2012, 01:58 PM   #2
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I'm just curious about what were the "serious objections to air travel" that's mentioned. It was long before I arrived here, but well before 1963 I don't recall any objections to air travel back in the UK. In fact, it was a time when inexpensive package holidays to various continental resorts were really beginning to ramp up.
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Old 09-04-2012, 07:24 PM   #3
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I'm just curious about what were the "serious objections to air travel" that's mentioned. It was long before I arrived here, but well before 1963 I don't recall any objections to air travel back in the UK. In fact, it was a time when inexpensive package holidays to various continental resorts were really beginning to ramp up.
Good question. Maybe hurting small communities between the cities? Safety or noise pollution?
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Old 09-04-2012, 08:27 PM   #4
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Here's the full index of This Day in Journal History stories:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/history/index.html


* New City Hall in the 1950s:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/busin...974/story.html

* Hey, remember when Edmonton had powerful representation in the House of Commons? Thanks, Anne McLellan:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...512/story.html

* Oh noes! 2% Alberta sales tax!
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/busin...442/story.html
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:44 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by howie View Post
I'm just curious about what were the "serious objections to air travel" that's mentioned. It was long before I arrived here, but well before 1963 I don't recall any objections to air travel back in the UK. In fact, it was a time when inexpensive package holidays to various continental resorts were really beginning to ramp up.
Good question. Maybe hurting small communities between the cities? Safety or noise pollution?
Hi KC. I can't see those suggestions as being impediments to air travel then or now. Still plenty of small rural communities. Safety and noise pollution really only come into play in fairly close proximity to airports. Commercial aviation had been around 40 years or so prior to 1963. Surely it wasn't viewed by the general public as some kind of new fangled thing. Still scratching my head about this.

Mr. Hinderks, any ideas about this "objections" business?
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Old 09-04-2012, 09:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KC View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by howie View Post
I'm just curious about what were the "serious objections to air travel" that's mentioned. It was long before I arrived here, but well before 1963 I don't recall any objections to air travel back in the UK. In fact, it was a time when inexpensive package holidays to various continental resorts were really beginning to ramp up.
Good question. Maybe hurting small communities between the cities? Safety or noise pollution?
Hi KC. I can't see those suggestions as being impediments to air travel then or now. Still plenty of small rural communities. Safety and noise pollution really only come into play in fairly close proximity to airports. Commercial aviation had been around 40 years or so prior to 1963. Surely it wasn't viewed by the general public as some kind of new fangled thing. Still scratching my head about this.

Mr. Hinderks, any ideas about this "objections" business?
Tell you what I know.

Bear in mind the Jet age of air travel was just dawning, the speed, comfort, reliability of the aircraft and scheduling was no where near what it was to be even 10years later.

As a percentage of income cost where fairly high and passenger capacity low by today's standards.

Fly on a piston engine airliner...it's darn noisy! Heat, too much or too little this was long before jet engines provided "bleed air" heating and AC was not on the plate yet.

The top A/C of the day were ether Second World War designs or derivatives of them. Narrow, low ceilings, loud.

You were flying basically 1/2 the height you do today at best...so you were not going over the weather...you were going through, rough, nasty.

Accidents, while not common, were not unheard of compared to today where its a major deal if there is a minor incident.

In this environment the AirBus was a big break through.

Cheap, easy and a short flight geared to the business traveler that needed to hit Edmonton and get home.

PWA did an amazing job of creating the current system of domestic travel with the AirBus and as the equipment improved (Turbo props, Jets, wide fuselages) it just worked better and the increasing volume meant the prices stayed low, routes expanded first Provincially then Western region and eventually beyond.

Remember at that time Edmonton was the Provincial powerhouse and the traffic was coming here and returning.

Neat stuff
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:15 PM   #7
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Well, I can see some pretty valid reasons in there, Tom, but expectations were less then. The first flight I ever took was in 1967 on a (long gone British Eagle airine) Vickers Viscount and I thought it was wonderful. That said, I wonder if I'd feel the same way now. And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.

BTW, is that a Viscount pictured in the Journal article? Looks pretty similar to this lay eye.
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:30 PM   #8
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Well, I can see some pretty valid reasons in there, Tom, but expectations were less then. The first flight I ever took was in 1967 on a (long gone British Eagle airine) Vickers Viscount and I thought it was wonderful. That said, I wonder if I'd feel the same way now. And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.

BTW, is that a Viscount pictured in the Journal article? Looks pretty similar to this lay eye.
DC-4 in the Journal pic...some might think a DC-6 but the windows give it away.

Howie
By 1967 the game had already changed dramatically with the penetration of both Turbo props and Jets into the travel market.

I flew the Viscount as a kid and had the chance to do it again in the 80s, much more like flying today than flying in the 40s, 50s and early 60s.

Look up an AVRO Lancasterian on the internet or an AVRO Tudor it will give you a Viscount equivalent built in England.

Air Canada was the big user of the Viscount in North America BTW.

Quote:
And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.
Wasn't a slow start here, Canada was hauling more freight and passengers than Europe but Turbo Props and Jets were not as easy to adapt to our market and the availability of Piston engine airliners, ground equipment and spares was much easier here for the big pistons than turbines.

Traveling was because you had too...not for fun.

- Our distances were greater
- Temperatures more extreme
- Runways shorter and very often rougher if paved at all up North

These factor meant expensive

Europe is
- Pretty much short haul
- Great runways
- More temperate

Made transition to Turbo props and Jets easier and short haul high load made it easier for the tourist market sooner.

So while we didn't get to the high volume tourism till later Canada was hauling Cargo and moving people like crazy for other reasons.

Look up the "Distant Early Warning Line" or "The Pine Tree Line" huge projects all air supported, crews moved that way too!
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Old 09-04-2012, 10:50 PM   #9
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Cheers, Tom. I'm always impressed with your depth in this subject.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:46 PM   #10
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Thanks
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:47 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by howie View Post
Well, I can see some pretty valid reasons in there, Tom, but expectations were less then. The first flight I ever took was in 1967 on a (long gone British Eagle airine) Vickers Viscount and I thought it was wonderful. That said, I wonder if I'd feel the same way now. And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.

BTW, is that a Viscount pictured in the Journal article? Looks pretty similar to this lay eye.
DC-4 in the Journal pic...some might think a DC-6 but the windows give it away.
Actually, that's a DC-6 in the Journal pic.

The DC-4 has round windows, but the DC-6 has square windows. That plane in the pic has square windows.

I was tempted to say DC-7 (PWA did have a few of those in its fleet), but the DC-7 has four-bladed props, while the DC-6 has only three-bladed props. Once again, the plane shown in the pic has only three blades per prop.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:16 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by howie View Post
Well, I can see some pretty valid reasons in there, Tom, but expectations were less then. The first flight I ever took was in 1967 on a (long gone British Eagle airine) Vickers Viscount and I thought it was wonderful. That said, I wonder if I'd feel the same way now. And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.

BTW, is that a Viscount pictured in the Journal article? Looks pretty similar to this lay eye.
DC-4 in the Journal pic...some might think a DC-6 but the windows give it away.
Actually, that's a DC-6 in the Journal pic.

The DC-4 has round windows, but the DC-6 has square windows. That plane in the pic has square windows.

I was tempted to say DC-7 (PWA did have a few of those in its fleet), but the DC-7 has four-bladed props, while the DC-6 has only three-bladed props. Once again, the plane shown in the pic has only three blades per prop.
Mike

I beg to differ, you are right on the window change but have the aircraft mixed up I do believe.

The DC-4 was unpressurized and had the square windows.

The DC-6 was pressurized and had the rounded windows.
The reason was to eliminate the sharp corners on the windows as they were a point where fatigue cracks would start (discovered in the DH Comet accidents.) on pressurized aircraft, and why today's airliners still have rounded windows not square.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeK View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thomas Hinderks View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by howie View Post
Well, I can see some pretty valid reasons in there, Tom, but expectations were less then. The first flight I ever took was in 1967 on a (long gone British Eagle airine) Vickers Viscount and I thought it was wonderful. That said, I wonder if I'd feel the same way now. And all that booming UK-continent business was conducted on turboprops of one sort or another, so I still don't fully get the slow start to the business here.

BTW, is that a Viscount pictured in the Journal article? Looks pretty similar to this lay eye.
DC-4 in the Journal pic...some might think a DC-6 but the windows give it away.
Actually, that's a DC-6 in the Journal pic.

The DC-4 has round windows, but the DC-6 has square windows. That plane in the pic has square windows.

I was tempted to say DC-7 (PWA did have a few of those in its fleet), but the DC-7 has four-bladed props, while the DC-6 has only three-bladed props. Once again, the plane shown in the pic has only three blades per prop.
Mike

I beg to differ, you are right on the window change but have the aircraft mixed up I do believe.

The DC-4 was unpressurized and had the square windows.

The DC-6 was pressurized and had the rounded windows.
The reason was to eliminate the sharp corners on the windows as they were a point where fatigue cracks would start (discovered in the DH Comet accidents.) on pressurized aircraft, and why today's airliners still have rounded windows not square.
No, I do not have the aircraft types mixed up at all when it comes to the windows.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_DC-4
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_DC-6

PWA DC-4: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Pacif...30ffebf939c9c7

PWA DC-6: http://www.airliners.net/photo/Pacif...7dc872bfb8e517

Also, the fuselage of the plane in the Journal pic is a little too long to be that of a DC-4. In fact, it's a DC-6B, an all-passenger variant with no cargo doors and a slightly lengthened fuselage at 105 ft 7 in - this is actually slightly longer than the 737-200 or even the 737-600! PWA had at least a few of both aircaft types in its fleet.

However, it is stated in PWA's reunion site (http://www.pwareunion.com/) that the DC-4 was used on the Airbus route between Edmonton and Calgary, but I think also that the DC-6 was likely also often used on that route. There are several pics of the DC-6 in a.net showing the DC-6B at YXD (in fact, all of them!). You will also find pics of both the DC-4 and the DC-6 in the Aircraft section of pwareunion.com site as well.

But you're right in that the DC-6 was pressurized, while the DC-4 was not.

I've definitely heard about the De Havilland Comet disasters off Italy in 1954 and how they led to the changes towards windows with rounded corners as is the case with many modern aircraft, or sticking to ovoid windows like with the Fokker F28.
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Last edited by MikeK; 11-04-2012 at 01:08 AM..
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Old 11-04-2012, 11:07 AM   #14
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Mike K

My error....at least I was right someone had them mixed!

PWA used both 4s and 6s from here even after the 737s hit.
Eldorado even longer
Buffalo still uses them today

A number of our members flew 4s and 6s for PWA and then on to Hercs and 737s

Amazing stuff
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Old 16-04-2012, 10:39 AM   #15
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So if you guys are now finished arguing about airplanes, some more interesting entries:

Muttart opens in 1976:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...026/story.html

Principal Plaza (now CWB tower) opens in 1981:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...837/story.html

Agricom opens in 1984:
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...746/story.html
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Old 16-04-2012, 02:36 PM   #16
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I love this addition to the Journal.

I don't subscribe but might buy more copies if the front page referenced some of these stories.

or even a teaser - What happened on ____ 1976?
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Old 23-04-2012, 12:15 PM   #17
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Remember how great we felt when the LRT was up and running?

Quote:
April 22, 1978: Edmonton’s LRT off and running

The new LRT began running, making Edmonton the first city in North America with a metropolitan population of fewer than one million to build a modern light rail transit system.

The original line was 6.9 kilometres long, running from Belvedere Station to Central Station.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...700/story.html
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Old 25-04-2012, 02:06 PM   #18
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April 25, 1906...Battle of Alberta begins...

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...753/story.html

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After a lengthy debate in the legislature, Edmonton was named the permanent capital city of Alberta, an honour that had provisionally been granted by Parliament.

Premier Alexander Rutherford stated that, under the Alberta Act, Edmonton was to be the capital until the legislature decided otherwise, and promised that he would see that the House would have a chance to decide the issue during this session.

The Hon. Mr. Cushing raised the motion that the capital be transferred to Calgary and said: “That in the opinion of this house, the seat of government of the province should be fixed permanently at the city of Calgary. Calgary has been and is now the largest business centre in the province and will continue to be.”

Cushing’s motion was seconded for the capital to be moved, but only for half the distance — to Red Deer. No one rose to second the amendment. Banff was also put forward as a candidate, but to no avail.

When the motion was put to a vote, eight members voted for Calgary and 16 for Edmonton. Red Deer and Banff received no votes.
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Old 25-04-2012, 02:08 PM   #19
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^ Imagine how the makeup of Alberta would be now if Calgary was named the capital city back in 1906?
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Old 25-04-2012, 02:31 PM   #20
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^ Calgary would probably be right behind Vancouver in terms of size and Edmonton would be the third-largest city on the prairies after Winnipeg. MAYBE a half million people.

Sure glad it didn't happen.
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Old 25-04-2012, 07:56 PM   #21
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“That in the opinion of this house, the seat of government of the province should be fixed permanently at the city of Calgary. Calgary has been and is now the largest business centre in the province and will continue to be.”
Was this true? Have they always been "the largest business centre in the province" even through the 50's/60's/70's?
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Old 26-04-2012, 10:33 AM   #22
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April 24, 1950: Alberta signs on Trans-Canada Highway
Edmontonians lobby for Yellowhead route
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...861/story.html

April 26, 1974: Mayor Dent hails provincial plan for comprehensive river valley recreation park
Capital City Park from legislature to Beverly Bridge
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...905/story.html
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Old 09-05-2012, 01:38 PM   #23
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Quote:
May 9, 1989: Getty redeems himself in Stettler weeks after losing city riding

Premier Don Getty swept to victory in a byelection in Stettler just weeks after suffering a humiliating loss in his former Edmonton riding during the provincial election.

On March 20, Getty lost to Liberal Percy Wickman in the Edmonton-Whitemud riding, a Tory stronghold for 18 years.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/1989+...917/story.html
This was the first time I voted in a provincial election.

In hindsight, what was Getty thinking to be running against the popular former city councilor Percy Wickman?
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Old 09-05-2012, 01:55 PM   #24
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LOL, Getty on attempt #2:

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“The other parties came in here and brought their big guns and we stomped them,” Getty said.
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Old 09-05-2012, 01:55 PM   #25
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^^ Are you joking? Getty was the Edmonton-Whitemud MLA since 1967 until then. Did you really expect him to switch ridings because the opposition ran a strong candidate against him?
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Old 09-05-2012, 02:04 PM   #26
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In hindsight, what was Getty thinking to be running against the popular former city councilor Percy Wickman?
Wickman was a great candidate, no doubt, but did Getty really have a choice? He won Edmonton-Whitemud by 60%-21% over the NDP candidate when he returned to politics in 1985, and won re-election a year later by 58%-30%. It would've been quite the sign of weakness for him to abandon his constituency for higher ground in advance of the 1989 vote.

Also, that was kind of a fascinating general election result, with the Liberals and NDP clocking in at 29% and 26% province-wide, respectively.

Here's some archival election night footage from CBC (worth a watch!): http://www.cbc.ca/archives/categorie...for-getty.html
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Old 09-05-2012, 02:06 PM   #27
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Okay, my bad. For some reason I thought Wickman was the incumbent.
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Old 09-05-2012, 02:28 PM   #28
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Getty was the Edmonton-Whitemud MLA since 1967 until then. Did you really expect him to switch ridings because the opposition ran a strong candidate against him?
Quote:
Also, that was kind of a fascinating general election result, with the Liberals and NDP clocking in at 29% and 26% province-wide, respectively.
Whitemud was a Tory stronghold for 18 years. You'll figure Getty, as the PC Party leader, would win slamdunk in 1989. Something must of soured in Whitemud.

Was Percy Wickman that much more of a better candidate? Why did the voters of Whitemud reject electing Alberta's next premier as their representative?
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Old 09-05-2012, 02:42 PM   #29
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Getty was never all that popular of a dude, and the economy was pretty weak under his reign. Wickman just seemed to capture voter disgust pretty well. One stunt in particular is memorable: Wickman famously held a mock "debate" against a giant rubber chicken after Getty refused to debate him: http://blogs.edmontonjournal.com/201...irl-flashback/
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Old 12-06-2012, 03:36 PM   #30
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Here's an interesting one:

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...380/story.html

June 12, 1981: City doubles size by expanding boundaries


Quote:
The provincial cabinet came to a decision that more than doubled Edmonton's size, making it Canada's largest city in area.

The new boundaries expanded in all directions: about five kilometres to the south, four kilometres to the west, plus a large section to the northeast, between Edmonton and Fort Saskatchewan.

Edmonton gained control of parts of Strathcona County's major industrial area, but not the entire refinery row area.

St. Albert and Sherwood Park retained their independence, while a metropolitan planning commission was created.

Mayor Cec Purves reacted to the decision, saying: "I'm pleased the government has addressed the issue and we can all get on with planning for the future.

"The government has recognized the need for more land and has given us enough for the next 40 or 50 years.

"That's what we set out to achieve, and we're very happy with that."

"It cost the taxpayers $10 million and the democratic process was circumvented," Social Credit MLA Walter Buck said.

Buck felt that premier Peter Lougheed should have sat down with representatives from the affected municipalities years earlier to iron out a decision.

The boundary changes took effect Jan. 1, 1982.
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Old 13-06-2012, 03:15 PM   #31
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I always wondered how and when Edmonton's city boundaries became what they are today...
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Old 15-06-2012, 11:47 AM   #32
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June 15, 1993: Klein Tories win big majority

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...867/story.html

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Edmonton voters snubbed the ruling Conservatives and embraced the opposition. The Liberals, led by former Edmonton mayor Laurence Decore, won all 18 Edmonton ridings.

“We didn’t lose Edmonton, we came close to winning it, and I will always support Edmonton,” Klein said. “This city will always be a very, very important part of our province.”
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Old 15-06-2012, 12:01 PM   #33
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Here's an interesting one:

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...380/story.html

June 12, 1981: City doubles size by expanding boundaries


Quote:
The provincial cabinet came to a decision that more than doubled Edmonton's size, making it Canada's largest city in area.

The new boundaries expanded in all directions: about five kilometres to the south, four kilometres to the west, plus a large section to the northeast, between Edmonton and Fort Saskatchewan.

Edmonton gained control of parts of Strathcona County's major industrial area, but not the entire refinery row area.

St. Albert and Sherwood Park retained their independence, while a metropolitan planning commission was created.

Mayor Cec Purves reacted to the decision, saying: "I'm pleased the government has addressed the issue and we can all get on with planning for the future.

"The government has recognized the need for more land and has given us enough for the next 40 or 50 years.

"That's what we set out to achieve, and we're very happy with that."

"It cost the taxpayers $10 million and the democratic process was circumvented," Social Credit MLA Walter Buck said.

Buck felt that premier Peter Lougheed should have sat down with representatives from the affected municipalities years earlier to iron out a decision.

The boundary changes took effect Jan. 1, 1982.
I remember one summer shortly after the boundary change, attending a youth-camp sorta thing with kids from all over the province, and those of us from the Edmonton area were being bussed home. We passed some piece of land near St Albert, and a kid who was from St. Albert said "This land here used to be a real mess, until Edmonton annexed it and then it got cleaned up".

I always thought that must've been kind of an embarrassing thing for someone from St. Albert to admit.
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Old 19-06-2012, 12:50 AM   #34
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June 16, 1926: City gets Canada's first municipal airport

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The federal government issued a licence authorizing the city to open Canada's first municipal airport.

Licence No. 1 was issued to Blatchford Field, a meadow at the far end of what is Kingsway. The land was named for then mayor Kenneth Blatchford, who had negotiated the deal.

It cost the city $400 to clear the brush and create two grass runways.

Care of the land was entrusted to Mary Watt, who regularly cut the grass.

Edmonton's top pilot, Wilfred (Wop) May, had lobbied for many years for a proper airfield in the city.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...836/story.html
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Old 19-06-2012, 07:14 AM   #35
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June 16, 1926: City gets Canada's first municipal airport

Quote:
The federal government issued a licence authorizing the city to open Canada's first municipal airport.

Licence No. 1 was issued to Blatchford Field, a meadow at the far end of what is Kingsway. The land was named for then mayor Kenneth Blatchford, who had negotiated the deal.

It cost the city $400 to clear the brush and create two grass runways.

Care of the land was entrusted to Mary Watt, who regularly cut the grass.

Edmonton's top pilot, Wilfred (Wop) May, had lobbied for many years for a proper airfield in the city.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...836/story.html
Yes indeed today was the day the paperwork was issued...

But Blatchford Field had yet to be named and the first flight did not touch down till January 1927 when Flight Lieutenant "Punch" Dickens touched down in his Armstrong Whitworth Siskin Bi Plane Fighter!


Tom
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Old 22-06-2012, 11:33 AM   #36
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June 22, 1983: $82-million Shaw Conference Centre opens

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...902/story.html

Ed Leger complaining about the Shaw being a burden on taxpayers...he must have been the Scott Hennig of his time, eh?
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Old 22-06-2012, 02:44 PM   #37
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Scott Henning had NOTHING on Ed Ledger.
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Old 26-06-2012, 08:52 PM   #38
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http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...911/story.html

June 26, 1972: Chief justice given gold key to new Law Courts Building

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Premier Peter Lougheed officially opened Edmonton’s new Law Courts Building in Sir Winston Churchill Square.

About 1,000 guests in the large ground-floor mezzanine watched as Chief Justice S. Bruce Smith accepted a gold key to the building from the province.

Lougheed, himself a lawyer, described the Law Courts as “magnificent,” but added “the spirit of the people” working in the building is more important.

Smith, Alberta’s chief justice since 1961, outlined the history of the building.

“About 1964 the Edmonton courthouse was becoming increasingly overcrowded. About that time I visited the then premier, the honorable E.C. Manning, to suggest that probably the time was ripe for the construction of a new courthouse.”

The old courthouse, which would be demolished to make way for expansion of a Woodward’s store, was built in 1912.

Smith described an initial meeting between the Law Courts expediting committee and architect Jock Bell in 1966: “When Mr. Bell asked us what a courthouse should look like, I am afraid we had to tell him that we didn’t quite know.”

Commenting on the interior of the building, the chief justice said prisoners would be handled in a more humane way than in the old building, never coming into contact with the public.
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Old 28-06-2012, 08:17 AM   #39
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June 28, 1915: Flood sweeps away 50 homes

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...755/story.html
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Old 01-08-2012, 12:10 PM   #40
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Aug. 1, 1926: Elephants stampede through Edmonton

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...677/story.html
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Old 17-08-2012, 03:23 PM   #41
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http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...896/story.html

Aug. 17, 1964: Edmonton brings Jasper Place into the capital’s fold

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The largest town in Canada, Jasper Place, became part of Edmonton.

The city takes over Jasper Place’s bonded indebtedness of about $8.2 million and assumed all public services such as water and transportation.

The town’s 38,000 residents became Edmontonians, bringing the city’s population near the 350,000 mark.

Since the town passed a night shopping bylaw in 1953, Jasper Place became famous as the place where night shopping “is the law.”

Even with amalgamation, stores in the town will be able to remain open six nights a week until 9 o’clock for the next three years.

Recent years have seen major housing and shopping centre projects throughout the town, including in the communities of Rio Terrace and Meadowlark Park.

A joint Edmonton-Jasper Place parade marked the demise of the town known as the “Young Giant.”
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Old 21-08-2012, 10:24 AM   #42
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Oh noes...snow in August, 1992!

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...667/story.html
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Old 21-08-2012, 11:27 AM   #43
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I remember that miserable snowy August day. I had to deliver newspapers.
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Old 21-08-2012, 10:33 PM   #44
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Yup me too. I was 18 and we were partying all night at buddie's place, someone looked out the blinds at about 6 am and it was snowing!
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Old 21-08-2012, 10:42 PM   #45
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I was in Montreal, which was overcast and +18 that day. I thought the weather was sucking there... until I got back!
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Old 22-08-2012, 01:24 AM   #46
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Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post

I was a patient of the Cross Cancer then...nearing the completion of a rather lengthy inpatient stay...measured in months and full of painkillers...

I went to sleep to a nice green warm evening....work up to snow...thought I was put into a coma and woke up in December...remember...heavy painkillers...

I don't know why I remember it...probably the minor meltdown I had on the staff...
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Old 22-08-2012, 02:10 AM   #47
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I actually have vivid memories of that. My buddy had it recorded as he did a drive from Montreal to Ed. and was just outside Sherwood on highway 16 east lol. OMG that was two decades ago! Was that not the year we also had +29 degree Nov.31? Anyone old enough remembered that?
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Old 22-08-2012, 02:17 AM   #48
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Originally Posted by Kitlope View Post
Yup me too. I was 18 and we were partying all night at buddie's place, someone looked out the blinds at about 6 am and it was snowing!
Buddy's above where the floc clothing boutique building.Actually, right beside on right hand side. For **** sakes, im old lol!
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Old 09-09-2012, 10:25 AM   #49
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Aug. 23, 1978: Clarke Stadium closes on a winning note

Aug. 31, 1989: LRT system opens new Grandin Station

Sept. 3, 1976: Muttart Conservatory opens in Edmonton river valley

Sept. 7, 1992: Snow puts a chill on first Big Valley concert
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Old 10-09-2012, 02:04 PM   #50
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Sept. 10, 1985: Opening of West Edmonton Mall, Phase III
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...792/story.html

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“It’s as big and impressive as the Ghermezians said it would be,” said Mayor Laurence Decore.
Quote:
“Nobody living in the Western Hemisphere will have to go to Europe anymore,” said Nader Ghermezian. “I can’t believe myself what we’ve built. When you come to West Edmonton Mall, it’s a world by itself — a world within a world.”
Quote:
Cec Purves, who was mayor when the mall was first approved, said it “exceeded all expectations. People are going to be flabbergasted. There’s no doubt about it, it’s the central attraction in northwest Canada.”
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Old 16-09-2012, 02:28 PM   #51
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Thankfully, nobody had to shell out thousands of dollars to see this big name!

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/trave...160/story.html
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Old 17-09-2012, 08:30 AM   #52
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http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...950/story.html

Edmonton's first airshow!
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Old 23-09-2012, 10:04 AM   #53
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Sept. 22, 1960: The sky’s the limit as mayor opens Queen Elizabeth Planetarium

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Old 04-10-2012, 03:14 PM   #54
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Oct 4, 1994: Mick, Keef, Charlie and Woody...schedule your next Edmonton gig during the summer, please
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...723/story.html
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Old 11-10-2012, 10:45 PM   #55
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Oct. 11, 1971: Edmonton travel made easier as James MacDonald Bridge opens

Oct. 7, 1913: Government House opens after more than $300,000 spent on construction
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Old 03-11-2012, 11:49 AM   #56
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Nov. 3, 1976: St. Albert becomes a city as of the following year

Oct. 30, 1913: Edmonton's first downtown arena burns down
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Old 19-11-2012, 05:55 PM   #57
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Nov. 18, 1971: Symphony’s recording with rock band Procol Harum puts Edmonton on the musical map
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Old 19-11-2012, 10:51 PM   #58
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LOL. Ye gods, the "on the map" is still being bandied about forty years on. Are we there yet?
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Old 27-11-2012, 12:18 AM   #59
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Nov. 26, 1980: Mayor Cec Purves unveils 18-storey Continental Bank Building

I believe this is the HSBC building north of City Centre Mall west.
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Last edited by Sonic Death Monkey; 27-11-2012 at 12:20 AM..
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Old 28-11-2012, 11:16 PM   #60
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Very interesting bit of history...

Nov. 28, 1979: Voters overwhelmingly endorse trade and convention centre at Grierson Hill

Quote:
EDMONTON - A decade of political hurdles and frustration ended for city council with an overwhelming public vote in favour of building the controversial trade and convention centre on the side of the riverbank.
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Old 30-12-2012, 04:31 PM   #61
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Dec. 30, 1961: One-time coal-mining town of Beverly swallowed up by Edmonton
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Old 05-02-2013, 04:54 PM   #62
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Feb. 5, 1908: Newly opened YMCA aimed at keeping men out of Edmonton saloons

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...452/story.html

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Old 05-02-2013, 04:54 PM   #63
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^ Anyone know where exactly this was located?
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Old 08-02-2013, 01:38 AM   #64
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Fortunate enough to find the Bulletin story from the old "100 years ago" thread. From the Saturday, September 14, 1907 edition, the story mentioned the building was to be situated at "the head of Howard Street" (100A Street), Not sure if that meant 102A Avenue, although it would make sense. http://www.ourfutureourpast.ca/newsp...e=N01P0628.JPG
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Old 08-02-2013, 03:11 AM   #65
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Indeed 100A Street extended to and ended at 102A Avenue before the Edmonton Centre complex was built (see for example the 1924 aerial photo series sheet CA 74-14).

That's exactly where the "old" pre Wheaton-family YMCA building still is. I'll it was built sometime in the 1960's on the site of the brick YMCA pictured in SDM's post 62.
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Old 08-02-2013, 01:29 PM   #66
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"Work on the construction of the new building addition began in 1951. This basement and fourstorey unit was built in front of, and incorporated, the original 1907 building. Facilities included a boiler room large enough for the entire new building when it was completed, boys’ game room and lounge, senior lounge, all purpose rooms - Alberta Room and Edmonton Room, health club, reception desk and two floors of residence rooms. A week of open house occurred
during the last week of April, 1952 to celebrate the completion of the new unit. The Y had to
float a bond issue to provide the funds required to complete the unit."

- "YMCA OF EDMONTON THE FIRST ONE HUNDRED YEARS" Page 73

http://www.edmonton.ymca.ca/Portals/...eb_version.pdf
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Old 22-05-2013, 02:02 PM   #67
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May 22, 1963: PWA begins regular Airbus service between Edmonton and Calgary

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The 64-passenger DC-4 left Edmonton on the inaugural flight at 1 p.m. Upon arrival, the group was transported downtown for a reception at the Calgary Petroleum Club.

By using the facilities of the Edmonton Municipal Airport and eliminating advance ticket-processing, check-ins and baggage disposal, an hour of travel time was saved.

The one-way fare of $11 compared with $13 for flights from Edmonton International Airport, and there were three flights each to Calgary each day and three return flights to Edmonton.
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Old 22-05-2013, 03:52 PM   #68
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May 22, 1963: PWA begins regular Airbus service between Edmonton and Calgary

Quote:
The 64-passenger DC-4 left Edmonton on the inaugural flight at 1 p.m. Upon arrival, the group was transported downtown for a reception at the Calgary Petroleum Club.

By using the facilities of the Edmonton Municipal Airport and eliminating advance ticket-processing, check-ins and baggage disposal, an hour of travel time was saved.

The one-way fare of $11 compared with $13 for flights from Edmonton International Airport, and there were three flights each to Calgary each day and three return flights to Edmonton.
We have been cheering this one all day but didn't think it would be appreciated on the forum.

That said I sure miss the service.

The poor old DC-4s....

50 years later they are still fighting fires and hauling cargo and some passengers across the North and in other parts of the world.

Wish we could have got one...but no room and no time now.

In my highly biased personal opinion
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Old 22-05-2013, 04:14 PM   #69
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Cool. And if you Google DC-4, then go to Wiki, you get a photo of guess what, guess where?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_DC-4
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Old 22-05-2013, 04:57 PM   #70
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Cool. And if you Google DC-4, then go to Wiki, you get a photo of guess what, guess where?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_DC-4
Yep

And that's North West Industries (now Northgate Trailer) in the background

IIRCC
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Old 07-09-2013, 06:53 AM   #71
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Anybody living in Edmonton in 1992 will surely remember this.

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...149/story.html
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Old 14-02-2014, 10:43 AM   #72
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Feb. 14, 1979: TSN sportscaster fought city curfew bylaw as a teen

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...476/story.html

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Old 01-03-2014, 10:35 AM   #73
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March 1, 1958: Marlin Perkins future host of TV’s Wild Kingdom attracts huge crowd
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...dmontonjournal

At the time of this article, what is now the Edmonton Valley Zoo was about to open and Perkins gave it his stamp of approval.
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Old 04-03-2014, 08:13 AM   #74
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March 4, 1978: Jasper Avenue one big drag

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...dmontonjournal
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Old 04-03-2014, 10:19 AM   #75
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From the above article - Beaver Hills Park under construction


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Old 04-03-2014, 12:32 PM   #76
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Good ol' stab happy park.

Top_Dawg remembers the original version quite well.

With the rolling hills and pathways.

When Top_Dawg and his crew were still underage it was pretty hard to buy beer at the vendors without getting carded.

So Top_Dawg would go to the tavern of the Mayfair Hotel.

Or maybe it was called the Vega.

There he would turn on the charm and the poodles would sell him a coupla cases of off-sales.

Top_Dawg and his posse would lug them down the back alleys to Beaver Hills.

And guzzle them.

Always had to watch out for the bulls though.

They would sneak up over the hills, give you a $50 IP, and abscond with yer booze.

Arseholes !

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Old 04-03-2014, 08:53 PM   #77
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Interesting picture above. In 1978 Edmonton was really booming, note the cranes on 4 office towers under construction at once.
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:46 PM   #78
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Interesting picture above. In 1978 Edmonton was really booming, note the cranes on 4 office towers under construction at once.
Actually three office towers and a hotel. But, yeah, that's when Edmonton still had aspirations of matching Calgary tower for tower. Fools ...

As for the park, it was originally a boondoggle due to ne'er-do-wells performing all manner of illicit transactions in poorly lit and well hidden (aka perfect) conditions.
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Old 05-03-2014, 08:19 PM   #79
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You're right, one of the cranes is for the Westin.
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Old 27-03-2014, 08:41 AM   #80
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March 27, 1962: Rodeo brings The Rifleman to Edmonton

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...798/story.html

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A chilled crowd of 400, most of them children, were on hand at the Municipal Airport to greet TV’s The Rifleman, Chuck Connors.

Connors, who arrived by helicopter from the international airport, was in town to appear at the 12th annual Rodeo of Champions, Canada’s largest indoor rodeo, with an estimated $16,000 in prize money.

“You will find this a peaceful city: you will not need to use your rifle at all,” mayor Elmer Roper said while greeting the tall, lanky star.

Connors wouldn’t have been able to produce his rifle anyway, as it was still at the other airport.
The 41-year-old American actor was a big draw, whether giving a pep talk to 200 junior exhibitors during a luncheon at the Edmonton Gardens or taking part in a bull-chasing act at the evening rodeo.

Connors starred as widowed rancher Lucas McCain, with Johnny Crawford as his son Mark, on the popular western series, which aired from 1958 to 1963. It was the first show to feature a widowed father raising a young child.

Connors’ presence in Edmonton was credited in part for the record-breaking crowds of 5,000-plus that attended each of the first two days of the event. The numbers prompted rodeo officials to start talking about expanding the rodeo to a 10-day event the next year.

This gives me an excuse to post one of the all-time funniest pics here!

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Old 27-03-2014, 12:26 PM   #81
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Old 01-04-2014, 10:56 AM   #82
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I love how they chose April 1 to lower the age of majority from 21 to 18

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...122/story.html

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Some 90,000 18- to 20-year-olds in Alberta became adults after the age of majority was lowered from 21.

Changes in the law meant a person 18 or older could now vote, serve as a juror, marry without parental consent, and have a pint at the pub.

It also affected 58 other pieces of legislation, such as drawing up a will that left an estate to an adult when they turned 18 instead of 21.

Thousands of youths welcomed their new status by hitting Edmonton’s beer parlour, bars and liquor outlets. Most used birth certificates to gain admittance to hotels because Alberta Liquor Control Board photo identification machines were 10 days behind in setting up.

Commercial Security Ltd. was offering proof of age cards for $1.50, complete with photograph, but a liquor board spokesman said the cards might not be accepted at drinking establishments.

Many new adults were caught off guard as the age change was expected to become legal the next day.

At the Bruin Inn in St. Albert, the beer parlour had been turning 18-year-olds away until a telephone call at 6 p.m. from the RCMP on behalf of the liquor board notified them that this younger group could be legally served now.

The information spread quickly in urban centres, where some hotels reported an increase of about 25 per cent in their normal business because of the lowered drinking age.

It was a slightly different story in the remainder of Alberta.

The Oil Sands Hotel in Fort McMurray was barren of customers in the 18-to-20 age bracket because as Mike Kolewaski of the hotel put it, “We don’t have word from the liquor control board yet.”

Newly eligible patrons were also being turned away from a beer parlour in Spruce Grove.

But at the Corona Hotel in Edmonton, bar manager Floyd Becker said 50 kids so far had had their identification checked.

“We’re generally pretty full every night and the crowd here is young,” he said. “There’s generally a lineup outside the door to get in.”

Starting that night, the lineup would be a little longer ... and a little younger.

Alberta, Manitoba and Quebec are the only provinces where it’s legal to drink at 18 today. Everywhere else it’s 19.
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Old 09-05-2014, 09:53 AM   #83
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May 9, 1969: Led Zeppelin plays Edmonton Gardens

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...dmontonjournal

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EDMONTON - They weren’t rock legends yet, but Led Zeppelin were well on their way when they performed at the Edmonton Gardens during their second tour of North America.

Edmonton and Vancouver were their only Canadian dates.

Britain’s hottest and loudest new rock band must have made some ears bleed when they “let loose an earthquake of sound and frenzy,” wrote Journal reviewer Bob Harvey. “Their music’s loud, almost to the point of pain, but they don’t use volume to cover up deficiencies.

“The volume is part of their attack.

“Probably the most aggressive, masculine rock group anywhere. They batter at the mind and ear, insisting that they will penetrate.”

Formed in late 1968, their first album, Led Zeppelin, was the result of their first two weeks together. It was No. 3 on the music chart at CHED, then a rock radio station.

Tickets for the Gardens show were $3.50, $4, and $4.50.

The band’s rock gods included 21-year-old singer Robert Plant, 23-year-old guitarist Jimmy Page, 22-year-old bassist and keyboardist John Paul Jones, and 21-year-old drummer John Bonham.
Quote:
Two months later Led Zeppelin came through Edmonton again — one of only three Canadian stops along with Vancouver and Toronto — and played for a standing-room-only crowd of 5,000 at the Kinsmen Field House on July 29th, along with Vanilla Fudge. Tickets were $4 in advance, $5 at the door.
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Old 09-05-2014, 03:01 PM   #84
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My dad saw Zeppelin twice here in Edmonton. The funny thing is, nobody believes him.

There are a ton of great old acts like that (The Who, Queen, Zeppelin, KISS, etc.) who played in Edmonton years before they became stadium draws.
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Old 09-05-2014, 03:38 PM   #85
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KISS has always said that the U of A was one of the very first places they played when they started out. Plus I read somewhere that Queen's very first show in Canada was at the Kinsman.
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Old 10-05-2014, 12:05 AM   #86
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KISS has always said that the U of A was one of the very first places they played when they started out. Plus I read somewhere that Queen's very first show in Canada was at the Kinsman.
This is an excellent resource.

http://www.setlist.fm/


Not only can you find back archives of who played where, and when but in posted instances the entire setlists that they played. Although that aspect of the site is somewhat like Wikipedia in that if somebody posts up the wrong list it sometimes is, or isn't corrected. Can even listen to the songs on the setlist as you walk down concert history. Its hard not to spend hours there.

for instance

http://www.setlist.fm/setlist/led-ze...-6bde5236.html

http://www.setlist.fm/setlist/led-ze...-63de52eb.html

The first, at the Gardens, was the better show, The Dazed and Confused Page solo that night was 20mins long. I believe the article mentioned that. Led Zep at the time would often play 3hr shows. Songs just went on and on but with nobody as you can imagine complaining.

PS I was at that Queen Kinsmen show. My first concert, what a concert.
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Old 10-05-2014, 12:13 AM   #87
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My dad saw Zeppelin twice here in Edmonton. The funny thing is, nobody believes him.

There are a ton of great old acts like that (The Who, Queen, Zeppelin, KISS, etc.) who played in Edmonton years before they became stadium draws.
Not just back then, but even 20 years ago. I know people who saw Nirvana play at The Bronx (now the Starlite Room) about a year before Nevermind. And I had to miss a Pearl Jam/Soundgarden double-bill at the Shaw just before both bands became arena acts.
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Old 10-05-2014, 09:59 PM   #88
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Originally Posted by Sonic Death Monkey View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by MrOilers View Post
My dad saw Zeppelin twice here in Edmonton. The funny thing is, nobody believes him.

There are a ton of great old acts like that (The Who, Queen, Zeppelin, KISS, etc.) who played in Edmonton years before they became stadium draws.
Not just back then, but even 20 years ago. I know people who saw Nirvana play at The Bronx (now the Starlite Room) about a year before Nevermind. And I had to miss a Pearl Jam/Soundgarden double-bill at the Shaw just before both bands became arena acts.
They certainly did, but It was the Rev not Bronx.
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:16 PM   #89
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It was not the Rev in September 1991 when Nevermind was released. Wasn't until a couple years later when Furnaceface was around
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Old 10-05-2014, 11:22 PM   #90
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If it was 91, then it would be the Bronx. Keep in mind that the Bronx and Rev were in one building without a division. Oh the good old days lol.
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Old 12-05-2014, 09:20 AM   #91
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May 12, 1987: Klondike Kate symbolizes sleaze, labour leader says

http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...dmontonjournal

#facepalm
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Old 12-05-2014, 12:18 PM   #92
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1980's feeble attempts at being PC crack me up.
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Old 09-07-2014, 09:42 AM   #93
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July 9, 1978: River valley park system opens

EDMONTON - Hundreds of observers cheered as premier Peter Lougheed and mayor Cec Purves officially opened the $34-million Capital City Recreation Park.

The three-hour ceremony, starting at the Legislature Building with the unveiling of the first of four commemorative pylons, took the 92-member official party to the Cloverdale Amenities Site, Gold Bar and Rundle Park.

“This park is one of the best things to happen to Edmonton,” Purves said. “I remember in 1974 when we all took a look at the concept (of a 16-kilometre park) and here we are four years later.”

The park, which stretches from below the legislature to Hermitage Park, is connected by a system of trails, paths, and bridges. The project, a co-operative city-provincial project, was funded through the Heritage Trust Fund.

“This is a project which exemplifies what it is all about to work together,” Lougheed said. “It was a co-operative venture between the city and its officials and the provincial government, for the people.”

After the first unveiling attended by about 250 Edmontonians and a barrage of television cameras, two city buses carried the official party and media to the second 4.2-metre-high pylon at Cloverdale Amenities Site.

From the Cloverdale site the group was ushered down a hiking trail to Rafter’s Landing where 10 jet boats carried the life-jacket-clad officials east down the twisting river to Gold Bar Park.

Beside the river, bicyclists rode over paths.
“I’ve been here since 1949 and always thought the park would never be built,” said Germaine Dalton, 65. “But it’s here.”

The master of ceremonies at Gold Bar, MLA Bill Yurko, said he was excited about the park because of the quality of life it would bring to the eastern half of the city.
“There were lots of industries her before, but no parks.”

The final leg of the journey was on foot, as the official party, accompanied by joggers, bicyclists, and pedestrians, walked across the new Rundle Bridge to the family recreation centre.

An estimated 140,000 people took part in the free, daylong festivities which included an open-air concert featuring Dom Troiano, One Horse Blue, the Fifth Avenue Allstars, Toronto’s Shooter, Winnipeg’s Crowcuss, and headliner San Francisco’s Rubicon, made up of members of Sly and the Family Stone and other players.

Beer and gallon jugs of Cherry Jack wine and skeins of hard liquor were visible everywhere but one of 10 police officers patrolling the park, said there was to be no strict enforcement of liquor or drug laws that day.
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...588/story.html
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Old 02-08-2014, 01:00 PM   #94
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Aug. 2, 1936: Swastika flags in abundance at German-Canadian picnic

Swastika flags were everywhere at the German-Canadian Society’s annual reunion picnic at Victoria Park, despite an order from mayor Joseph Clarke that no special prominence be given the Reich’s new national emblem.

In the weeks leading up to the picnic, Clarke banned the German flag and ordered police to remove it if it was raised at the picnic, even though the German flag flew during the previous eight picnics. [...]

Abele said being forced to remove the Hitlerite decorations from the hall stage was “the worst insult I’ve ever seen given to the German people.”
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...828/story.html
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Old 07-08-2014, 09:34 AM   #95
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August 7, 1979: $80 million mall for west Edmonton
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...561/story.html

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EDMONTON - Looking back, the announcement seems underwhelming for a project that at one time would be promoted as the Eighth Wonder of the World.

A small, four-inch story buried in the Journal’s Business section announced the construction of an $80-million shopping mall in west Edmonton to start in the fall.

Chartwood Developments of Toronto would be developing Capital Mall at 87th Avenue and 170th Street on behalf of Edmonton’s Triple Five Corp., the story said.

The two-level enclosed mall, scheduled to open in August 1981, would be anchored by a two-level Eaton’s department store, a two-level Hudson’s Bay department store, and a two-level Simpson-Sears department store.

It would also contain a major food store and approximately 180 other retail outlets.

Parking would be provided for 4,800 vehicles.

Eighteen hectares of the 24-hectare site would be used for what would be the first phase of the project containing 78,000 square metres of shopping space.

When it opened in September 1981, Phase 1 was 106,000 square metres and had 220 shops and services, making it the largest mall in North America.
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Old 23-08-2014, 08:07 PM   #96
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Marx Brothers, 1913
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...135/story.html

The Who (opening for Herman's Hermits), 1967
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...258/story.html

Edmonton's first rock festival, 1970
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...505/story.html

Bay City Rollers, 1976
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...290/story.html

KISS, 1977
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...219/story.html
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Old 24-09-2014, 08:29 AM   #97
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Sept. 24, 1965: Wayne and Shuster sorry they came to Edmonton
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...803/story.html

Yeesh!
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Old 15-10-2014, 09:46 PM   #98
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Never seen this building before! would have been fantastic still standing at that corner.



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The first Woodward’s department store outside of the company’s flagship store in Vancouver opened its doors on the northeast corner of 102nd Avenue and 101st Street.

Charles Woodward chose Edmonton, he said, because it was one of the most important and progressive cities in Western Canada.
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/...120/story.html
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