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View Full Version : The Benifits of having a "low" DT



edmonton daily photo
30-08-2008, 04:07 PM
Have you ever been to Washinton DC or Paris.

They have hight restriction over most of the city..

It's a very interesting a diffrent feel, and I pesonally quiet enjoy it.

Eachcity does have areas where highrises have been constructed though.. DC has Emerald City and Paris has the "new area".

I still love the story of Paris's first highrise and how it was soooo loathed another was not built for a good 2-3 decades.

Medwards
30-08-2008, 04:36 PM
Ottawa also has a height restriction over the city... self imposed...

richardW
30-08-2008, 05:39 PM
that paris building was just a monstrosity thats why, if it was a better design i am sure there wouldn't have been such uproar.

ike9126
30-08-2008, 11:39 PM
i think downtown is already too far gone to keep it low. the only thing to do is build up up up or it'll look weird and stunted

Kevin_Foster
31-08-2008, 12:37 AM
Are you talking talking about tour montparnasse? I love that tower.

But keep in mind that many people loathed the Eiffel, and still do to this day..

Jeff
31-08-2008, 12:38 AM
Washington Post OpEd:

"the D.C. height restriction has also promoted suburban sprawl, boxified the city's architecture and deadened Washington's downtown. It has inflated office rents, deflated the municipal tax base, limited affordable housing, contributed to the region's hideous traffic jams and generally helped keep Washington a second-tier city despite the unrelenting growth of its major industry -- the government." (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/06/30/AR2006063001316.html)

IKAN104
31-08-2008, 09:20 AM
I don't personally see any benefit to a low downtown. Young cities like Edmonton can't be compared to the historic ones like Paris. Their city feels and looks nice because of the historic architecture. Not because the buildings are short.

moahunter
31-08-2008, 09:35 AM
I don't personally see any benefit to a low downtown.
On the whole I agree, and we have a long way to go before we have a tall downtown. As it stands, a very large percentage of downtown grows massively in height each workday, well over 100%, from nothing to 5 feet or so (or whatever the average height of an auto is), and while this results in a slight visual improvement over gravel, it would be nice to have more permanent height increases, as I don't find much of our low downtown that appealing.

newfangled
31-08-2008, 11:24 AM
Young cities like Edmonton can't be compared to the historic ones like Paris.

Yup.

Having a row-rise downtown (with maybe a few skyscrapers) would be absolutely fine with me.

But we don't have that. What we have is a downtown of stunted high-rises. And there's a huge difference, especially at ground level.

What we have is counter-intuitively less dense, because of the huge gaps between high-rises. But at the same time many of our "high-rises" are as wide as they are tall. It's the worst of both worlds.

mark
31-08-2008, 11:57 AM
But we don't have that. What we have is a downtown of stunted high-rises.
.... But at the same time many of our "high-rises" are as wide as they are tall. It's the worst of both worlds.

this is an important idea. if we're talking about the visual impact of our building forms, we can't overlook proportion when we're discussing height. I agree that our main problem isn't that our buildings are short; it's that our buildings are short and fat.
If we arent going to close the airport and eliminate height restrictions anytime soon, the EDC should start requiring slimmer towers. I think that's why the Icons look so good!

davidnorwoodink
01-09-2008, 08:55 AM
Interestingly, the City of Paris recently removed height restrictions in most of its core area. The Tour Montparnesse was considered an abomination when it was built, and all of the City's highrises we moved to the periphery, mainly La Defense to the west of the core. But for whatever reason, the Tour montparnesse will soon be joined by other towers, and I'll bet that many of them will be residential.