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View Full Version : How would I find out how many brownfields are in the city?



LindseyT
24-01-2007, 10:06 AM
You know, contaminated sites such as former gas station and industrial sites awaiting remediation. Any idea where such a list would be available?

I've sent off some emails, but if anybody can point me in the right direction, in case those go nowhere, would be appreciated.

snakes on a blog
24-01-2007, 10:22 AM
Not sure, but i do know of 2 very bad eye-sores. One smack dab in the middle of the best real estate in the city - 105 st and whyte. a terrible blight that has been going on much to long. what does it take to get Imperial Oil to clean up this mess in a timely fashion?
the other is on gateway and about 45 ave by superstore. another example of how irresponsible some land owners can be.

LindseyT
24-01-2007, 10:28 AM
Yeah, I'm doing a report for an env eng class and I'm really curious to see if I become more sympathetic towards these land owners as it progresses and I do some cost analysis. ...probably not.

TroyD
24-01-2007, 11:16 AM
You might be able to call Climate Change Central (http://www.climatechangecentral.com/), or Alberta Environment.

grish
24-01-2007, 12:08 PM
one next to windsor's pub across from Lister. and did the one on jasper and 116 have become one as well?

I would really hate if that location ends up being another brownie.

IanO
24-01-2007, 12:18 PM
city would have a list.

LindseyT
07-02-2007, 10:31 PM
I figured I should let you guys know.. From somebody within the Environment branch at the city.

25 Jan., 2007
Hi Lindsey:
Thank you for your inquiry. Here's the best I can offer in response.

Occasionally I have heard the number of brownfield sites in the City of Edmonton has been quoted from various sources. To this day we have been unable to track from where these mythical, rough guess numbers have been generated. They cannot be substantiated by the City in any way shape or form. To date, we really don't know, even on a rough estimate basis, what the number of brownfield sites in Edmonton really is. We are currently working on developing an inventory of environmentally flagged sites in the City. We have thousands of sites listed as being flagged, but the reason for the flag in our system can at times be quite innocent. For example some sites are flagged because they had a watermain break across the street! So we have to go through the environmentally flagged sites to determine why each flag was applied. We have run into a few logistical problems, and processing flaws in our method of assessment along the way. I don't suspect we'll have an answer to your question for at least another year or two.

In spite of this you might want to look at some federal estimates and try some sort of pro rata estimate considering population and industrial factors as weight determinants. (2900 sites across Canada - 30 million people - 9 million in Alberta, one million in Edmonton 1/30 of sites here, would be 100. Good enough a guess as any I suspect, but again - it can't be substantiated in other more realistic terms).

You might already know, the US is WAY ahead of us (Canada) in addressing brownfield issues. They have investors that buy contaminated sites and remediate and resell them as investments, and lots of brownfield statistics. In Canada you might get some statistics from NRTEE, National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy. (http://www.nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/programs/Current_programs/Gbudget/Budget2001/budget2001_brownfields_e.htm)

IanO
08-02-2007, 01:13 AM
I figured I should let you guys know.. From somebody within the Environment branch at the city.

25 Jan., 2007
Hi Lindsey:
Thank you for your inquiry. Here's the best I can offer in response.

Occasionally I have heard the number of brownfield sites in the City of Edmonton has been quoted from various sources. To this day we have been unable to track from where these mythical, rough guess numbers have been generated. They cannot be substantiated by the City in any way shape or form. To date, we really don't know, even on a rough estimate basis, what the number of brownfield sites in Edmonton really is. We are currently working on developing an inventory of environmentally flagged sites in the City. We have thousands of sites listed as being flagged, but the reason for the flag in our system can at times be quite innocent. For example some sites are flagged because they had a watermain break across the street! So we have to go through the environmentally flagged sites to determine why each flag was applied. We have run into a few logistical problems, and processing flaws in our method of assessment along the way. I don't suspect we'll have an answer to your question for at least another year or two.

In spite of this you might want to look at some federal estimates and try some sort of pro rata estimate considering population and industrial factors as weight determinants. (2900 sites across Canada - 30 million people - 9 million in Alberta, one million in Edmonton 1/30 of sites here, would be 100. Good enough a guess as any I suspect, but again - it can't be substantiated in other more realistic terms).

You might already know, the US is WAY ahead of us (Canada) in addressing brownfield issues. They have investors that buy contaminated sites and remediate and resell them as investments, and lots of brownfield statistics. In Canada you might get some statistics from NRTEE, National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy. (http://www.nrtee-trnee.ca/eng/programs/Current_programs/Gbudget/Budget2001/budget2001_brownfields_e.htm)


thanks lynd.

glasshead
09-02-2007, 10:38 PM
I would try Alberta Environment; specifically soil and groundwater. According to the Alberta Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (AEPEA), decommissioning of a site (such as gas stations) require soil and/or groundwater reclamation, in order to receive a reclamation certificate from Alberta Environment. This is part of the AEPEA legislation as per link:

http://www3.gov.ab.ca/env/protenf/landrec/index.html

Not sure if in Alberta there is a public registry for contaminated sites, but there is in BC.