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View Full Version : Cooking Lake is Drying Up



jstock
05-07-2009, 07:12 AM
http://www.edmontonjournal.com/news/Cooking+Lake+slipping+away/1761080/story.html


"To me, the toughest thing to comprehend is you look out there and you think lake," said Dan Lutz, a director for the Cooking Lake Sail Club.

...Lutz believes the lake's rapid decline in the past decade has to do with the weather, but he would like a thorough study.


..."We don't want people to say, 'The lake is gone, let's bulldoze it, fill it in and build here,' " Todd says.


The 1970s study suggested a pipeline from the North Saskatchewan River could supplement the lake level, but Forsythe and Todd doubt there would be any serious consideration given to that idea--especially not this year.

...Most central Alberta lakes have not been severely affected by the recent dry conditions, with a few exceptions, says Cara Van Marck, an Alberta Environment spokeswoman. Pigeon Lake is 0.3 metres below the normal for this time of year; Coal Lake is approximately one metre below normal; and Buffalo, Sylvan, Abraham and Glennifer Lakes are either above or near normal water levels for this time of year.

moahunter
05-07-2009, 09:24 AM
^That's nature I guess, things change. I don't know if it makes sense to try and intervene to change that, it might just cause more problems. Its good to read other lakes are doing ok.

edmonton daily photo
05-07-2009, 10:22 AM
Buffalo lake was water from the Red Deer River pumped into it.

THe article should mention that!

Chmilz
05-07-2009, 11:56 AM
Intervention has mostly destroyed central Alberta's largest lake: Beaverhill Lake, by Tofield. 16km long by 10km wide, it is (was?) huge, now mostly a patchwork of swampy bits and dried earth. The waters that fed into it were diverted to Camrose to be used as their general water supply and is visible as a little downtown lake/reservoir. Truly sad. There's not enough lakes in central and southern Alberta as it is.

NorthernBillsFan
30-07-2009, 08:50 AM
All the lakes are drying up.

We build more roads and cut of the streams and rivers that supply those lakes and they dry up faster than a grape on a window sill.

MrOilers
30-07-2009, 09:38 AM
Most water in this country is non-renewable as well. As much as 90% of the freshwater in our lakes came from the melted glaciers that were here during the last ice age.

MagicMonkey
30-07-2009, 09:59 AM
Intervention has mostly destroyed central Alberta's largest lake: Beaverhill Lake, by Tofield. 16km long by 10km wide, it is (was?) huge, now mostly a patchwork of swampy bits and dried earth. The waters that fed into it were diverted to Camrose to be used as their general water supply and is visible as a little downtown lake/reservoir. Truly sad. There's not enough lakes in central and southern Alberta as it is.

Can you please tell me where you learned all this about Beaverhill Lake? My family has lived in the area for years and it's common knowledge in town that it's drying up but I never heard that the lake was used in any way as a water supply for Camrose some 70km south. On a side note I have heard that the lake used to have a thriving commercial fishery in the long past and that it was loaded with fish at one time.

NorthernBillsFan
30-07-2009, 12:10 PM
Most water in this country is non-renewable as well. As much as 90% of the freshwater in our lakes came from the melted glaciers that were here during the last ice age.On a tour of the Athabasca Glacier the guide told us the snow we get in the COlumbia Ice Fields every year is more than enough to sustain Canada and it's demand for water outside of commercial use.

The rapid decline of the Athabasca Glacier is evident as the production of oil went up during the 80s and again in the early part of this decade. You can see how fast it declined during these times.

rime ice
30-07-2009, 07:48 PM
For reasons unexplained, probably just the natural cycle of the planet Alberta seems to be drying up all over. Next time your on final approach into YEG take a good look at the topography. You will notice depressions in the earth that were obviously lakes and even some dried up river beds. A birds eye view at 2000-4000ft really tells the story.
We are entering the earths summer season, just as a year has seasons so does planet earth, of course on a grander cosmic scale.
This means the eventual drying up of marginal lakes and rivers.
How wide was the North Saskatchewan millenia ago, very wide if you look at the river banks and flood plain around downtown area.
I would like to think almighty man has caused the change in our climate but we take way too much credit, the earth has seen much greater threats than us.
Plate tectonics comes to mind and there are many many more if you really sit and think.
Check out George Carlin "Saving the Planet" on You Tube its a good laugh.